Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-10-17, 06:02 AM   #1
Fritzov
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Sleeping system/shelter

Total newbie into touring/bikepacking and looking to start doing over night trips during the weekends and is looking for recommendation for a sleeping system and or shelter. I will be doing solo trips so it will only need to fit myself. My budget would be around 300-400 dollars. Anyone have any suggestions ?
Fritzov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 06:11 AM   #2
suburbanbeat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
You're kind of asking two different questions. Ideal sleep systems and shelters for (fully loaded) touring will be different from the ideal system for bikepacking, at least as far as tents/shelters are concerned.

However, for both applications, the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm is going to be one of the lightest, most compact, and most comfortable sleeping pads that you can buy. It retails for about $175, so it's not cheap at all, but it packs down to about the size of a tall boy aluminum can and inflates/deflates quickly. I've used it for years and couldn't say enough good things about it.

If we're talking specifically about touring-appropriate shelters that aren't as restricted by bike-packing size requirements, I would recommend the Marmot Limelight tent, either the one- or two-person version. I personally use Limelight 2P, because the packed weight and size is only slightly greater than the 1P, and the extra room on a rainy night makes all the difference in the world. Well, to me at least.

Last edited by suburbanbeat; 05-10-17 at 06:15 AM.
suburbanbeat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 07:07 AM   #3
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO, Scottsdale, AZ
Bikes: 1996 REI Randonee, 1983 Trek 620
Posts: 1,135
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
I've been successfully using a single-wall tarp hybrid from Tarptent.com. And a very nice 30F down quilt from enLightened Equipment. I sleep fine with a simple closed cell foam pad. That all cost me about $400 (five years ago), total weight just over three pounds. You could save money on a less expensive bag or quilt.
andrewclaus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 07:43 AM   #4
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 29,078
Mentioned: 65 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3176 Post(s)
Library has back issues of backpacking magazines, to read a lot of gear revues..

an REI store will have all their most popular stuff on display to try in person.

crawl in the bag ,see if a mummy , the lightest bag will be tolerable, and tents too big or small.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 07:50 AM   #5
john_mct
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 216
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
My plan for over-night/short trips or times when I want to go light/minimal:

Borah Gear Snowyside Event Bivy, Air pad of choice (klymit ones pack small, are cheaper, and the gaps allow your sleeping bag to insulate below you), and whatever 30-40 degree down bag you can find on closeout (mine's a Marmot something or other I've had for a few years).
john_mct is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 08:04 AM   #6
rickyk76
Senior Member
 
rickyk76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes: 2016 Cannondale Slate; 2013 Novara Ponderosa 29er; 2014 Novara Randonee
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbanbeat View Post
However, for both applications, the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm is going to be one of the lightest, most compact, and most comfortable sleeping pads that you can buy. It retails for about $175, so it's not cheap at all, but it packs down to about the size of a tall boy aluminum can and inflates/deflates quickly. I've used it for years and couldn't say enough good things about it.
How loud is it? I've looked at some of their models, and it seemed like they sounded like crumpling paper when moving around on them.
rickyk76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 08:17 AM   #7
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 15,425
Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4210 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickyk76 View Post
How loud is it? I've looked at some of their models, and it seemed like they sounded like crumpling paper when moving around on them.
How recently did you try them out? Yesterday I read some never user reviews that claim TR has fixed the original noise problem.
indyfabz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 09:11 AM   #8
Squeezebox
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 2,087
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
The X-lite is cheaper but does not have as much R factor. Not a problem over 40 degrees or so.
Check out what the backpackers think about it at, Whiteblaze.net
Squeezebox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 09:19 AM   #9
Rob_E
Senior Member
 
Rob_E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Bikes: Surly World Troller, Downtube 8H
Posts: 2,205
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Love my hammock-camping rig. I've used it for mini tours and weekend bike-camping trips many times. I'll be trying it with a bikepacking set-up in the near future. Right now the whole set-up: hammock, underquilt, overquilt, and tarp takes up about 21 liters of space, but my quilts are synthetic, so they don't pack down that small, and I'm not using any compression sacks, so I feel like it could be a fair amount smaller, but that would just free up more room for more junk, so maybe not necessary.
Rob_E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 10:36 AM   #10
rickyk76
Senior Member
 
rickyk76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes: 2016 Cannondale Slate; 2013 Novara Ponderosa 29er; 2014 Novara Randonee
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
How recently did you try them out? Yesterday I read some never user reviews that claim TR has fixed the original noise problem.
About 2 weeks ago at a General Mast store in Asheville, NC. No idea if it was old stock or what.
rickyk76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 01:36 PM   #11
Leebo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,
Posts: 4,702
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 462 Post(s)
My touring/bikepacking set ups are the same, small and light as possible. An eno double nest hammock, tarp to fit on the diagonal, closed cell foam pad and a bug net. Warm weather New England tourer here. No need for underquilt, also allows to sleep on the ground. I use a 45 F North face sleeping bag, very small and minimalist. Not everyone can get comfortable in a hammock, trees are usually good to have too, plenty in New England. Nice to get off the ground for critters, monsoons and sideways sitting makes a nice chair as well.
Leebo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 02:06 PM   #12
bwgride
Slow Rider
 
bwgride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Georgia, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,029
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Hammock Option
1. Top quilt - see Hammockgear.com - they have a line of economy quilts that use 1.1 nylon material with 800 down (treated to be water resistant). These are good quality quilts for low price. The standard length quilt (74"x50" 19.5oz) rated at 30F is 138, and for wide version (74"x55" 21.5oz) $158.

2. Bottom quilt - again, see economy line from Hammockgear.com. I recommend getting full length. Standard full length underquilt at 30F is $138. Down top and underquilts pack much smaller than comparable synthetic versions, so less space needed with bikepacking.

3. Hammock - many options available at good prices. I recommend one with ridgeline for consistent hang. They are easy to make, but if new you may opt to buy. Warbonnetoutdoors.com makes great hammocks - their traveler without net is $60. dutchwaregear.com also has a number of nice options for good prices. There is also the $30 hammock that can be bought from amazon, walmart, etc. Usually these do not have a ridgeline to provide consistent hangs, and are usually heavier than those noted above. Try to avoid parachute nylon hammock since they can stretch during the night and leave you on the ground or close to it. Ripstop nylon seems to perform better as hammock material than parachute nylon. Also, avoid nylon straps as a hammock suspension for the same reason. Use either polyester straps or whoopy slings for suspension. Depending on where you plan to go, a bug net may be needed. Two general types - those attached to hammocks, and those that are separate. For the price and weight, buying an initial hammock with attached bug net might be less expensive.

4. Tarps - a silnylon 11' or 12' tarp is they way to go. Warbonnetoutdoors.com mamajamba at about $120 is excellent, and dutchwaregear.com has a silnylon tarp for $95 that is 11'. To save money, there are a number of good, inexpensive tarps too. For example, the Chinook 12' tarp costs about $45 on Amazon and works well, but is heavier than the silnylon tarps.

More information can be found on Hammock Forums - Elevate Your Perspective


Tent Option
1. Tents - Tarptent (as someone else mentioned) make excellent, lightweight tents. For less money, there are a number of small tents that can be found for under $200 (e.g. Sierra Designs, Eureka, etc.). A good place to find inexpensive tents is Tents: Average savings of 36% at Sierra Trading Post -- get on their email flyer for weekly discounts.

2. Quilt - I recommend a wide quilt rather than sleeping bag. The quilt noted above in hammocks is very good value. You can find good prices on sleeping bags at sierratradingpost,com

3. Pad - many have offer suggestions here.
bwgride is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 06:59 PM   #13
stevepusser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 682
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Depending on what the overnight low is expected to be on your overnight in midsummer, and how warm you sleep, you might just leave the sleeping bag at home and take a cheap synthetic fleece blanket instead.
stevepusser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 07:05 PM   #14
BigAura
 
BigAura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chapin, SC
Bikes: all steel stable: surly world troller, paris sport fixed, fuji ss
Posts: 3,203
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 489 Post(s)
My Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm is not noisy although is was pricey. BUT it is by far the most comfortable, lightest, and most compressible++, sleeping pad I've ever used. It's amazingly tough too!
BigAura is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-17, 07:22 PM   #15
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones
Posts: 13,173
Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2638 Post(s)
A lot of this gear is expensive and the OP has a budget of $300-$400 for tent, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad.

I'd hunt around for gear on sale; check out REI outlet and Sierra Trading post.

By and large you are not going to go wrong getting gear from reputable manufacturers.

This big agnes air core sleeping is $55.73 at REI outlet for example:

https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/produ...e-sleeping-pad

I like that it's 3.25 inches; I find a little thicker matters more comfortable.

For sleeping bags, I'd look at synthetic in your price range like this mountainsmith bag at $89.73

https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/produ...f-sleeping-bag

The weight isn't terrible either. That leaves you in the neighborhood of $150 for a tent if trying to get your gear for $300 total.

A lot of folks on BF like this Eureka spitfire tent; it's a good design. The 2 person (and you really want the extra space for a 2 person even if going solo) is on sale at Campor for $159.96

https://www.campmor.com/c/eureka-spitfire-2-tent

Last edited by bikemig; 05-10-17 at 07:29 PM.
bikemig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 04:51 AM   #16
john_mct
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 216
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
That air core, while a decent deal, will literally suck the warmth out of your body. Not a problem unless lows drop below the high 40s or so. I have one and use it but wish I would have gotten something with at least some R value. Even in a 32 degree bag I can feel cold on that pad in the mid 40s. The issue being that the insulation in the sleeping bag doesn't work when it is compressed between the body and the pad. Planning to replace it with a Klymit pad that allows a bag to insulate a bit from below. This is one place I would not skimp again if I had the choice. It is much easier to unzip your sleeping bag to let out some warmth than it is to deal with a cold back in the middle of the night until the sun rises. Spending twenty more dollars to upgrade to the insulated version is certainly worth it if you ever think you might spend cool to cold nights outdoors...
john_mct is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 05:00 AM   #17
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500
Posts: 1,348
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
What sorts of night temperatures are you thinking? Are you close to an outdoor store like REI to see things in person? Do you need the ultimate now or some basics and upgrade when you learn more?

I tend to be a tent+pad+sleeping bag person since that gives me a lot of flexibility.

For tents: weight, size as well as protection from elements, bugs and condensation matter. Tarps are a light weight option for some. Easiest thing is to see some tents since folks are different on amount of space that feels comfortable/claustrophobic. I personally have two person tent I can sit up in, bring in my gear and protection against worst of the bugs but you may be fine with something more minimal.

Sleeping bags are rated to lowest temperatures. Weight is trade-off here as well as if it retains heat after getting wet. Get enough for you conditions but not too much more bulky/heavy.

Sleeping pads provide insulation and comfort. They can be full length or shorter. Quite useful.

Visiting an outdoor store will show some of the products.

It is possible to get some items on the cheap first e.g. tube tent, basic bag and pad. Potentially also to borrow some items. May not be the ultimate yet, but enough to get you by and then upgrade selected items as you get experience and learn your preferences.
mev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 05:06 AM   #18
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500
Posts: 1,348
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
My Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm is not noisy although is was pricey. BUT it is by far the most comfortable, lightest, and most compressible++, sleeping pad I've ever used. It's amazingly tough too!
I like my NeoAir as well. I've now punctured two of them camping in desert regions with thorns and sharp things under the tent. One in Africa and second in Baja Mexico. They include a patch kit, but can be tough to find the holes.
mev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 06:34 AM   #19
Aushiker
Senior Member
 
Aushiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Fremantle, Western Australia
Bikes: Surly Long Haul Trucker, Salsa Mukluk, Giant Defy
Posts: 1,124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbanbeat View Post
You're kind of asking two different questions. Ideal sleep systems and shelters for (fully loaded) touring will be different from the ideal system for bikepacking, at least as far as tents/shelters are concerned.
I bikepack, I tour and I backpack. I use the same shelter for all three modes. It has never occurred to me "I needed" an "ideal system" for each mode or any specific mode such as touring so I am very curious as to your rationale here. After all it is all it is camping irrespective of style of transport. The only consideration I had in my choice of shelter was its pack-down size, so if the OP is serious about bikepacking that is maybe something to consider.

My current choice of shelter is a Zpacks Duplex which being cuban fibre hasn't really ticked the packability box but I am happy with it. That said it is outside the price range of the OP so not suggesting it as suitable option.

My previous shelter was a Tarptent which is differently a brand I would recommend to the OP. Some excellent options in their range.

This is my bikepacking setup BTW ...

Holland Track Day 2: Salsa Mukluk at Granite Rock Outcrop by Andrew Priest, on Flickr
Aushiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 06:46 AM   #20
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones
Posts: 13,173
Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2638 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by john_mct View Post
That air core, while a decent deal, will literally suck the warmth out of your body. Not a problem unless lows drop below the high 40s or so. I have one and use it but wish I would have gotten something with at least some R value. Even in a 32 degree bag I can feel cold on that pad in the mid 40s. The issue being that the insulation in the sleeping bag doesn't work when it is compressed between the body and the pad. Planning to replace it with a Klymit pad that allows a bag to insulate a bit from below. This is one place I would not skimp again if I had the choice. It is much easier to unzip your sleeping bag to let out some warmth than it is to deal with a cold back in the middle of the night until the sun rises. Spending twenty more dollars to upgrade to the insulated version is certainly worth it if you ever think you might spend cool to cold nights outdoors...
That's a really good point about the R value. I was thinking more about trying to hit the OP's budget and a pad that was reasonably thick. The OP can get the same pad with a much higher R value for $71.73 and still be well within budget

https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/produ...ng-pad-regular

By and large most of the posts have ignored the OP's budget in making recommendations.
bikemig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 07:07 AM   #21
Trevtassie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Down Under
Bikes: A steel framed 26" off road tourer from a manufacturer who thinks they are cool. Giant Anthem. Trek 720 Multiroad pub bike. 10 kids bikes all under 20". Assorted waifs and unfinished projects.
Posts: 759
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Have a hunt on Steep And Cheap. If time is not an issue eventually you'll find everything you want at the right price.
Exped Down Mattress $110, Alps Mountaineering Chaos 2 tent $120. I got a North Face Campforter for about $130. Covers pretty well everything you need.
Trevtassie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 08:02 AM   #22
suburbanbeat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickyk76 View Post
How loud is it? I've looked at some of their models, and it seemed like they sounded like crumpling paper when moving around on them.
So my X Therm is probably about 3 years old now, which I assume makes it an "old" version. I was initially reluctant based on that same concern that it would be too noisy. Personally, I don't find it to be all that noisy. It does kind of sound "papery" when moving around on it, but that sound isn't loud enough to bother me or my wife, awake or asleep.

If you can imagine what one of those foil emergency blankets might sound like if you were to move it around, it sounds kind of like that. But again, when its in the context of wind/insects/ambient noise, it's barely noticeable.
suburbanbeat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-17, 08:46 AM   #23
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit
Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama
Posts: 5,763
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2275 Post(s)
One option no one has tossed out if you don't need lots of padding: the blue roll pads. I use them for most all of my camping. Finally bought an inflatable, because I didn't want to eat up the space in my plane luggage, but the blue rolls are cheap and effective for me.

Moosejaw outlet has a few Marmot 2P tents in the mid $100's right now.

Sleeping bag, only thing I can suggest is that you figure out what temps you'll be using it in, and get one 15-20F lower than those expected temps. I use a 25F for Michigan summers, where the temps can easily get down in the high 40s/low 50s. If it is warmer, I just leave it unzipped. I haven't seen too many truly quality bags in temp ratings much higher than that either.

Also, if you have a Gander Mountain around you, they are all liquidating right now, you may be able to grab a deal on a bag and pad.
jefnvk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-17, 03:22 PM   #24
BBassett
Senior Member
 
BBassett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Puyallup, WA
Bikes: Tout Terrain, Panamericana
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Sleep options

I carry gear for 4 different modes of sleep. The quickest to set up is if I am just going to crash and try to recharge is a 8 X 10 poly tarp, a sleeping bag or blanket and a blow-up pillow. If there are bugs I throw a bivy down on the tarp. Depending on time and temperature I also carry two Eped - Downmat XP 9 LW air mattresses. They are heavy compared to backpacking gear and are well insulated. When there is proper support to hang it, I use an Amok hammock. The Exped air mattress fits it like a glove. It has bug protection like the bivy and it's own tarp when I chose to use it. If I am going to be in a spot a little longer I will put up a Trail Star tarp/shelter. This is an amazing piece of gear. When it's raining heavy I will often put this up over bivy, hammock, or tent. I had it specially built so it can be hung or supported by an extendable pole. It can be lowered to the ground and staked in heavy wind, set-up cocked back to enjoy the view or elevated over the hammock and used as a rain/sunscreen. When I get somewhere that I want to stay a few days I set up Bertha... a Hilleberg Keron 4 GT with both air mattresses. This has space for everything, and then some. On the inside of these, I use a Rumpl camping blanket or a Sierra Designs Backcountry Bed, double sleeping bag. One last item that comes in handy is a silk double sleeping bag liner. It helps with dialing in the right level of warmth and to keep the bag and/or blanket clean. This gear gives me all the options I ever need. Yes, it's overkill and heavy. Weight isn't the biggest problem but rather size. The bag and blanket have to be packed with cinch straps and the air mattresses are large and heavy themselves. If it's warm out start with what is appropriate and add pieces as you can. Think of it like clothing, loose and layered. Hope this helps.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Tarp 8X10.jpg (6.3 KB, 319 views)
File Type: jpg ZPack bivy.jpg (97.0 KB, 320 views)
File Type: jpg Amok.jpg (21.3 KB, 321 views)
File Type: jpg TrailStar.jpg (26.3 KB, 323 views)
File Type: jpg Keron 4 GT.jpg (3.8 KB, 319 views)
File Type: jpg 14_DownMat_9_XP_LW.jpg (18.8 KB, 319 views)
File Type: jpg Rumpl blanket.jpg (15.9 KB, 318 views)
File Type: jpg sierra-designs-backcountry-bed-duo.jpg (98.2 KB, 320 views)
File Type: jpg Bag liner.jpg (6.8 KB, 318 views)
BBassett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-17, 05:00 PM   #25
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 4,927
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
You must be one tough dude to be able to carry 4 sleeping systems, umbrella, stainless steel thermos jug, and a folding chair on tours. Have you ever toured in a place that has hills?

Last edited by Doug64; 05-16-17 at 05:21 PM.
Doug64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:45 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION