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Old 08-04-17, 10:47 PM   #26
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I have the Crank Bros. Double Shot's on my bike. I like to be clipped in on the road, but on gravel, not so much. The only thing I don't like about it having to keep flipping the pedal to the side I want. Other than that, I think that there is a Shimano XT SPD pedal for touring that is set up similar to the CB's. Just something to think about if you want to ride SPD's still.

Crank Bros Double Shots have worked great for touring, I like how the binding side is still fairly comfortable to pedal w/street shoes ie short distance after stops. Double-sided SPD pedals look to have low grip & control when pedaling w/street shoes on binding side.
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Old 08-04-17, 11:11 PM   #27
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I've used just about everything at one time or another, but finally returned to the simple alloy pedal with reflectors and toe clips. I like the way the toe clip holds the foot firmly in place on the pedal, while not having to find the sweetspot of clipping in and out repeatedly when riding through urbanized areas. I still use SPD style shoes because I like their power on the pedal, but I have removed the cleats. In my experience, it did not matter how deep the cleat was recessed in the sole of the shoe, it still made awful grinding noises when walking on concrete and sometimes there would be tapping when walking on museum floors.
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Old 08-05-17, 06:32 AM   #28
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If I ever change from the "rat trap" and clips I'll get these from Kona.
https://www.pinkbike.com/product/kona/Wah-Wah/
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Old 08-05-17, 07:44 AM   #29
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Get a set of black and silver pedals. You can't go wrong with those
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Old 08-07-17, 12:17 AM   #30
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I've toured on toe-clips, clipless & platform, can't say one type is best but when falling over sideways at stops w/clipless or toe clips it's generally less painful than say hopping off a curb w/platforms & having pedal smack into shins.
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Old 08-07-17, 04:27 AM   #31
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personally i prefer the mks lambda. its a platform only pedal. i use it year round. used clips and straps before i decided to go with these.

Review: MKS Lambda / Grip King Pedals
I feel that ditching the "clipless" pedals was one of the best things I ever did. The benefit I gained from them was negligible and the "hot foot" was unbearable on long fully loaded trips. I use the MKS Lambda pedals with spikes added and they are wonderful.

Marc
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Old 08-07-17, 06:25 AM   #32
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Most. Useless. Article. Ever.

Just because the author doesn't understand why the pedals are called "clipless", doesn't mean that they aren't effective. As for the GCN video, watch to the end to see why they aren't going to ditch their clipless based on their one test.

Flat pedals can have some done sides as well. You can find some pretty gruesome pictures of injuries from those pins on the Interwebs. And, without those pins, slipping off the pedals is even more common.
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Old 08-07-17, 06:52 AM   #33
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So I ordered the A530's. They are cheap enough I figured it was worth the risk to try it.
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Old 08-07-17, 07:04 AM   #34
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M520s for me. Around home on my beater errand bike I do like pedals with a platform on one side, but for more more serious riding around home or for touring I like the M520s.

It is personal preference though so whatever works for you. There are a lot of right answers for different riders.
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Old 08-07-17, 08:04 AM   #35
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Most. Useless. Article. Ever.

Just because the author doesn't understand why the pedals are called "clipless", doesn't mean that they aren't effective. As for the GCN video, watch to the end to see why they aren't going to ditch their clipless based on their one test.

Flat pedals can have some done sides as well. You can find some pretty gruesome pictures of injuries from those pins on the Interwebs. And, without those pins, slipping off the pedals is even more common.
I didn't quit based on their test either, but I don't race so that was not a consideration. As I said, I recommend quitting for comfort.

Marc
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Old 08-07-17, 09:04 AM   #36
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I didn't quit based on their test either, but I don't race so that was not a consideration. As I said, I recommend quitting for comfort.

Marc
I agree. I prefer platform over clipless. I like the wider pedal, it is more comfortable for me. On long days, I like the ability to shift my position at times. I hate being locked into one position. For me, platform pedals work the best. I don't slip on them, we or dry, since mine have the pins.
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Old 08-07-17, 09:46 AM   #37
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Flat pedals can have some done sides as well. You can find some pretty gruesome pictures of injuries from those pins on the Interwebs. And, without those pins, slipping off the pedals is even more common.
I dunno. I'm still learning clipless, and I have some nice marks in the side of my calf where my foot slipped trying to clip in and caught up on the big chain ring.

Does make me look more "pro" than a chainring tattoo though!
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Old 08-07-17, 12:09 PM   #38
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Its a personal preference, you should try both. That said, I strongly prefer clipless.

To me, its much better to have equipment suited for each task. Shoes for riding, and lightweight shoes for walking and or hiking. 200g or less for a dedicated pair of walking shoes is worth it to me.

Clipless is soooo much better (to me).

1)I feel so much more stable. Rain, downhills, rough roads or gravel, you know your feet aren't going anywhere unless you want to. Even more true when you're tired. Unclipping is probably about 99% as fast as taking your foot off the pedal once you are used to it.

2)If you get a decent pair of shoes, the soles will be much, much better than a pair of sneakers and also better ventilated. Anyone who complains about "hot spots" doesn't have the right shoe.

3) You can put on cycling booties/toes if its cold and the same if its wet. Hard/impossible to do with sneakers

4)Slightly more efficient pedal stroke. (though people will argue that, but smoother is going to be more effecient imo, and also better for the body)

SPD style are good for options and price. For functionality I like the Eggbeater platforms, but those are more expensive and more difficult to source if something goes wrong (though they are pretty much bullet proof, especially just for touring).

Last edited by fantom1; 08-07-17 at 12:22 PM.
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Old 08-07-17, 12:13 PM   #39
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I dunno. I'm still learning clipless, and I have some nice marks in the side of my calf where my foot slipped trying to clip in and caught up on the big chain ring.

Does make me look more "pro" than a chainring tattoo though!
I go back and forth and desperately trying to justify going clipless after 40 years of platforms. About once a month I reopen the almost healed road rash on my elbow from tipping over again.

Just rambling here but from my personal experience.
I've ALWAYS been a ~ 60 RPM person, large hills, on road, off road, standing, sitting, climbing, no hills, it didn't matter. Been riding like that for decades and I am just used to, tuned for it, built for it, and comfortable with it.. Recently... My knees are becoming a bottle neck so I am relearning and forcing myself to ride at 75-100. It is not easy for me and a whole different experience. Different things getting tired and weak at different times than before as I now do higher speed circles with less pressure on the pedals instead of low speed well planted pushes. In my perfect world, I can still stay with platforms and turn higher cadence but we'll see how it pans out as I try different things including slowing down.

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Old 08-07-17, 12:36 PM   #40
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I go back and forth and desperately trying to justify going clipless after 40 years of platforms. About once a month I reopen the almost healed road rash on my elbow from tipping over again.
I haven't had any of the issues that generally keep people from trying them, just now that I have given them a go, haven't fallen in love with them the way others have. I can see instances where they are nice, on my racier bikes, but at the same time really have no intentions of equipping all my bikes with them. Especially the touring/after work bikes, I think they are remaining platforms or dual-sided.

That said, I did just buy up a few sets of SPD that were marked down to $10 at Performance, as a few bikes are in desperate need of some sort of pedal upgrade, so a few of my bikes will be getting them.
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Old 08-07-17, 12:56 PM   #41
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324 or equivalent. Had 530 but they had inadequate support for non sped shoes and the chromed spring became a rust pile after a couple years in a marine environment.
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Old 08-07-17, 02:26 PM   #42
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Its a personal preference, you should try both. That said, I strongly prefer clipless.

2)If you get a decent pair of shoes, the soles will be much, much better than a pair of sneakers and also better
SPD style are good for options and price. For functionality I like the Eggbeater platforms, but those are more expensive and more difficult to source if something goes wrong (though they are pretty much bullet proof, especially just for touring).


I have SPD's on my commuter and Mtn bike and Look's on my road bike. I have never tried the egg beaters. They just look like I would get a hot spot. But I guess it wouldn't be any different than the SPD's. Why do you prefer the Eggbeater platforms? I don't mind spending more if it is well worth it.
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Old 08-07-17, 07:12 PM   #43
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So I ordered the A530's. They are cheap enough I figured it was worth the risk to try it.
I think you will like them.

I like SPD for a typical day of riding.

But I like platform for when I am wearing campsite shoes, or flip flops, or when my cycling shoes are soaked from prior days of rain, or when riding on difficult gravel or cobbly terrain, or if it is too cold out to wear cycling shoes (for me that means below 20 degrees F), or going to the grocery store or restaurant or tavern in the evening, or ... ...

And a pedal that works well for both is nice to have.
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Old 08-07-17, 07:12 PM   #44
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I dunno. I'm still learning clipless, and I have some nice marks in the side of my calf where my foot slipped trying to clip in and caught up on the big chain ring.

Does make me look more "pro" than a chainring tattoo though!
There's not a lot to learn. Put your foot on the pedal, squish it around and it'll engage. I would suggest setting the tension on the pedals low...probably as low as it'll go...and, if you are really, really new to clipless, finding someone with a pair of used cleats. They engage and disengage easier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fantom1 View Post
Its a personal preference, you should try both. That said, I strongly prefer clipless.

To me, its much better to have equipment suited for each task. Shoes for riding, and lightweight shoes for walking and or hiking. 200g or less for a dedicated pair of walking shoes is worth it to me.

Clipless is soooo much better (to me).

1)I feel so much more stable. Rain, downhills, rough roads or gravel, you know your feet aren't going anywhere unless you want to. Even more true when you're tired. Unclipping is probably about 99% as fast as taking your foot off the pedal once you are used to it.
Yup. I off-road with clipless (for more than 25 years) and am often astounded to find that I'm unclipped before I even think about it. Even when crashing, my feet come out of the pedals without my having to think about it.

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2)If you get a decent pair of shoes, the soles will be much, much better than a pair of sneakers and also better ventilated. Anyone who complains about "hot spots" doesn't have the right shoe.
People often forget about the effect heat and exercise have on their feet. They buy shoes that fit closely...most bike shoes do...and then the shoe is uncomfortable when it swells due to heat. Even the wrong socks can cause shoes to fit improperly.

And the act of riding a bike all day for days on end is going to make everything uncomfortable at some point.


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4)Slightly more efficient pedal stroke. (though people will argue that, but smoother is going to be more effecient imo, and also better for the body)
I seldom ride in anything but clipless shoes but the few times I have, I really notice it in my quads and knees. Some people may argue that we can't pull up with our feet...I'm not sure how they explain climbing stairs...but as was pointed out in the GCN video, I really notice it on harder efforts like climbing hills or accelerating. I do pull up on my feet then.

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SPD style are good for options and price. For functionality I like the Eggbeater platforms, but those are more expensive and more difficult to source if something goes wrong (though they are pretty much bullet proof, especially just for touring).
I admire the Eggbeater design but the price has always been a barrier. Damn Shimano makes a damn good product for a good price and when you have a stable of 7 to 13 bikes at any given time, the difference between a $20 pedal and a $60 pedal involves a fair chunk of change.

Lately I've been using some iSSi pedals from Quality Bicycle Products that have impressed me but they aren't cheap. They do have some features which make them attractive, however. The bearings are better and you can get spindle kits to widen pedal width. I've found this to be very useful for winter riding when using wider shoes and boots.
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Old 08-07-17, 07:25 PM   #45
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There's not a lot to learn. Put your foot on the pedal, squish it around and it'll engage. I would suggest setting the tension on the pedals low...probably as low as it'll go...and, if you are really, really new to clipless, finding someone with a pair of used cleats. They engage and disengage easier.
Yeah, tension is pretty low, just got a bit cocky thinking I had the process down and into the teeth my calf went
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Old 08-07-17, 11:18 PM   #46
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No Best.. just a personal preference .. each votes for their preference.
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Old 08-08-17, 11:57 AM   #47
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I have SPD's on my commuter and Mtn bike and Look's on my road bike. I have never tried the egg beaters. They just look like I would get a hot spot. But I guess it wouldn't be any different than the SPD's. Why do you prefer the Eggbeater platforms? I don't mind spending more if it is well worth it.
I like them because they clear wet sand and mud better in my experience. I've never had an issue clipping in regardless of where I've walked (or crashed) and they are pretty much maintenance free even in the worst conditions. They are also lighter, but I guess who really cares about that for touring.

The SPD design is inherently more prone to debris buildup, especially clay mud with pebbles.
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Old 08-08-17, 03:19 PM   #48
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Thanks. I may try them on my Mtn Bike. I have commuted off and on for years and road bike with groups but Mtn Biking and Touring are new for me.
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