Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-12-17, 02:12 PM   #26
revcp 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
Bikes: 2011 Surly Troll, 2012 Salsa Mukluk, 2015 Orbea Orca OMP (all built from frames)
Posts: 819
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
I think the responses highlight the problem of asking what is the "best" bar. People use all varieties to tour successfully so it really comes down to subjective opinion.


Yep. I sometimes wish these forums had an equal split between men and women. Then at least half the posts would be about why something is preferred instead of the poster arguing that it's preferable. There are SO many different styles of bars, and there are people who like each of them. Depends on how you ride, what you're riding, what your body is like, etc., etc. I like the Jones H on my Surly Troll. Multiple and varied hand positions, room for the few things I anchor to my bars. It works. For me.
__________________
Don't complain about the weather and cower in fear. It's all good weather. Just different.
revcp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-17, 04:07 PM   #27
NoControl 
Look Ma! No Hands!
 
NoControl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: New Hampshire
Bikes: Surly ECR, 1953 Dunelt
Posts: 791
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
Jones bars have lots of grip options. Start there. Go with what works for you. I like mt riser bars with a good sweep and bar ends, lots of hand options.
I'm really liking the Jones bars, and I have two bikes with them now. I have the 710mm width with ESI extra-chunky grips. I like the long grips because its easy for me to change up my hand position up and down the long grip. When I go for the loop, its rarely for very long, so I'm not inclined to wrap them with bar tape (yet).
__________________
"I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks" -Daniel Boone
NoControl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-17, 04:59 PM   #28
baldilocks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Indiana
Bikes: Giant ATX Lite ,Schwinn Mesa, Others
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
I love my Jones H loop bars.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20170516_203428.jpg (99.9 KB, 175 views)
baldilocks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-17, 05:24 PM   #29
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 6,905
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 438 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyber.snow View Post
Went to Amazon and ordered a set of Butterfly Bars in 31.8mm and a 1 1/2" rise flat bar and extension. Looks like they will both be at the house when we get back from Prague...by the way, perfect weather for riding, but stay out of old town...crazy with pedestrians and traffic.

Anyway, will take off the Jones Bar and give both a try. There is a 5 mile 7% climb on a gravel road behind my house that leads up to Boulder Reservoir. I will ride up the forestry road, then down the single track to the street. Second test will be a 45mile ride around Payette lake. Hopefully I will know which one I like. Can you think of anything else to try?
what I would add is to play around with the angle of the butterflys. I found that slight changes made for more comfortable hands, especially when riding over rough stuff with the hands on the predominant position of right at the corner area (same hand positioning as on hoods on drops, or on flat bars with bar ends using the bar ends (ish)

anyway, experiment and see what feels better, and live with them for a while and make changes on the fly.

remember too it may be hit and miss with the stem length angle etc, so good luck mucking about with that variable also.
djb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 12:07 PM   #30
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour and schwinn le tour iii
Posts: 1,018
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 331 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by djb View Post
what I would add is to play around with the angle of the butterflys. I found that slight changes made for more comfortable hands, especially when riding over rough stuff with the hands on the predominant position of right at the corner area (same hand positioning as on hoods on drops, or on flat bars with bar ends using the bar ends (ish)

anyway, experiment and see what feels better, and live with them for a while and make changes on the fly.

remember too it may be hit and miss with the stem length angle etc, so good luck mucking about with that variable also.
+1 on the angle. i dont use butterfly bars but with any bars the angle is a big part of my comfort for long mileage days.
52telecaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 03:59 AM   #31
irwin7638
Senior Member
 
irwin7638's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Kalamazoo, Mi.
Bikes: Byron,Sam, The Hunq and that Old Guy
Posts: 2,970
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Drop bars are the socially acceptable handlebars for any rider who wants to fit in as a "cyclist." I used them for years , and tried the butterfly bars which are better but still limit the body positions available. After trying Bosco Bars on a new light touring build, I switched the drops on my touring bike to Bosco's as well. They not only provide a multitude of hand positions and prevent numbness, but also allow positions ranging from full upright semi-recumbent to a time trial like aero position. They are not socially acceptable and confound the crap out of club riders, but work a helluva lot better than drops.



Marc
irwin7638 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 05:53 AM   #32
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 6,905
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 438 Post(s)
Cool and all, but I do feel that conservatively positioned drops are more suited to faster, downhill cornering, which I particularly enjoy.

In the end, I'd have to live with these to really know how they are.
djb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 06:12 AM   #33
Tandem Tom
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Bikes: 1992 Serotta Colorado II,Co-Motion Speedster, Giant Escape Hybrid, 1977 Schwinn Super Le Tour
Posts: 1,587
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Marc, those bars are neat! I am in the process of a sport/tourer build for my wife using a Miyata 310 mixte. So looking at some bar ideas.
Tandem Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 07:24 AM   #34
BobG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NH
Bikes:
Posts: 558
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
I almost never use the drop section of my bars. I'm usually on the hoods or tops. But like djb I also enjoy the lower gravity and security of the drops on fast descents. With upright bars you only have your thumbs to prevent loosing grip in the event of an unexpected bump in the road. In the drop position the palms are securely lodged to the rear of the hooks. Even with a loose grip you are unlikely to lose control from a surprise jolt.
BobG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 08:33 AM   #35
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 28,542
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3009 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
Try finding some non sticky bar tape so you don't have to scrap it every time you change the bars.
with a Trekking bar, the brake levers * slide on the open rear end, combined with open face stems, the tape can remain undisturbed.

*my 2 bikes with trekking bars have a grip shifter.. on each.

reaching the front bend and bending my elbows a little drops my torso down same as I'd get with drop bars, on the road bike..



.....

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-15-17 at 08:36 AM.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 08:52 AM   #36
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,730
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 519 Post(s)
My experience is that I tend to play with the cockpit for a while, adding areos, adjusting width of elbow pads etc... and usually wind up redoing the bartape as a result. I finally decided to just use the inner tube idea until I get things where I like... and then I scrap it all again anyway.

My latest incarnation are drops flipped and chopped like bullhorns. After riding for a while I realized on my semi upright bike I rarely used the drops but liked the buttress of the hoods which the uptick in the flipped bar provides. At the same time I wanted to try shellacing (sp?) cork bar tape. I'll post a pic later today as I'm off to work now.
Happy Feet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 10:15 AM   #37
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 1,638
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1036 Post(s)
I hear roads in Europe is not as good smooth as America...so makes sense they want butterfly and we want drop.
mtb_addict is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 01:07 PM   #38
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,730
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 519 Post(s)
No I don't think so. Road racing/cycling is way more popular in Europe and they use drop bars.

Without being political I think the US is far less accepting of different ideas and Europe tends to be more progressive as far as exploring out of the box technology. Here we feel we must use drops because that's what we use but maybe.. maybe we can bend them a little out or shorten the reach. In Europe I imagine they just chuck out the rule book for each activity and ask, what would a better bar look like? Or, what would a better IGH or generator etc... look like? They are a lot less constricted by tradition in that way. It's socially acceptable to innovate. Here, with so many things one seems to have to prove loyalty by remaining the same ie. Harley's and Ford trucks.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 09-15-17 at 01:16 PM.
Happy Feet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 01:34 PM   #39
fantom1 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Middle of the ocean
Bikes:
Posts: 400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
No I don't think so. Road racing/cycling is way more popular in Europe and they use drop bars.

Without being political I think the US is far less accepting of different ideas and Europe tends to be more progressive as far as exploring out of the box technology. Here we feel we must use drops because that's what we use but maybe.. maybe we can bend them a little out or shorten the reach. In Europe I imagine they just chuck out the rule book for each activity and ask, what would a better bar look like? Or, what would a better IGH or generator etc... look like? They are a lot less constricted by tradition in that way. It's socially acceptable to innovate. Here, with so many things one seems to have to prove loyalty by remaining the same ie. Harley's and Ford trucks.
My experience is exactly the opposite. In fact, I don't think I could have a more opposite experience. Have you lived in Europe? Have you ever tried to get a European to do something in a new way? There is a reason why since WWI the U.S. has been the hotbed of most innovation.

Throughout most of Europe Americans are known for embracing the new and weird...its one of our respected characteristics. I'm not sure why, but Americans love to imagine Europe is this utopia where the beer flows like wine. while America is so terrible. Each place has its pros and cons, but in the department of embracing change, there is literally no comparison.

Last edited by fantom1; 09-18-17 at 01:24 PM.
fantom1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 01:46 PM   #40
fantom1 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Middle of the ocean
Bikes:
Posts: 400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
Drop bars are the socially acceptable handlebars for any rider who wants to fit in as a "cyclist." They are not socially acceptable and confound the crap out of club riders, but work a helluva lot better than drops.



Marc
You must have a lot of hipster bike bullies where you are. Socially acceptable has nothing to do with it I don't think. Tourers normally don't give a hoot about anything but practicality by nature anyhow.

Different bars work for different people- end of story right?

If those bars really were so much better, everyone would use them. They work better for you, great. For others like me, that doesn't offer as much variability vertically and I don't like that hand position to begin with.

There are functional reasons why certain things become popular. Keep in mind bike bars have been around for at least a hundred years in various forms.
fantom1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 01:50 PM   #41
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 28,542
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3009 Post(s)
Product managers decide what goes on new bikes, but the Consumer is Free to change things to suit themselves.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 01:58 PM   #42
rjl33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 62
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
For me personally it is hard to beat drop bars, when properly set up, for comfort and multiple hand and body positions. I have a Fargo with Woodchippers, a Black Mountain Cycles cross frame with Cowchippers, and a fat bike with Jones Loop Bars. The keys for me with drop bars are having a bar with a shallow drop and some flare, and a bike setup that allows the handlebars to be high/even with seat. I wonder if some people that have had bad experiences with drop bars were on bikes with an aggressive riding position/handlebars too low? I like the multiple hand positions and the ability to change riding position, and the ability to get low in drops when riding against a headwind is significant. I do like the Jones Loop Bar for long fat bike rides/touring, but I did struggle for some time to get proper setup, mainly height and angle. Marc - I will admit that I would love to try a Hunqapillar with Bosco or Albatross handlebars! At this point, for long rides on mixed terrain, the Salsa Cowchipper bar is as good as it gets.
rjl33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 03:25 PM   #43
NoControl 
Look Ma! No Hands!
 
NoControl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: New Hampshire
Bikes: Surly ECR, 1953 Dunelt
Posts: 791
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
I'd like to try the woodchippers, but I just ordered a set of those Bosco bars for a build I'm doing.
__________________
"I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks" -Daniel Boone
NoControl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-17, 11:38 PM   #44
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,730
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 519 Post(s)
Well, no one said America was terrible.. only that Europe seems to embrace new technological ideas more actively at the moment. It's not a judgement. Part of it is probably that there is a huge population there of mixed cultures co mingling in a small geographic area so there are just a lot of new ideas being developed and part is a forward looking direction for solutions wherein the US seems to currently be looking back to the past in a nostalgic sense for solutions.

Sometimes designs come about for functional reasons and sometimes they don't. The well established functional design for a utility bike was the "Northwood" like bars similar to the ones in Irwin's picture. Almost all post war bikes had them. With affluence people could afford bicycles for recreation and racing and the drop bar road bike became vogue. With the bike boom people rejected the utility design as old fashioned and embraced the road design as being sporty. Now, even though in many ways the loaded touring bike is a utility design the stigma attached to utility bars remains. I just think European thinking is better at tweezing out the particular activity being asked of the bike and designing well made specific solutions. Here we seem to want to make one design fit all by bending and hammering it into a slightly different shape.

A truly innovative drop bar design would incorporate built in aero bars for example. So many people want them but still have to resort to after market patches to an old design that refuses to acknowledge that. Why? Partly it's inertia and partly there is no economic incentive.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 09-15-17 at 11:42 PM.
Happy Feet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-17, 10:29 AM   #45
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 28,542
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3009 Post(s)
I have an old set of bars 1 tube bent to be both the bullhorns and the aero bars , the market for that is small in the aftermarket, triathletes mostly..


OEM demand probably Nil.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-17, 01:10 PM   #46
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,730
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 519 Post(s)
IDK. I bet you see a lot more people adding after market aeros to drop bars than you see people buying manufactured Velo Orange crazy bars. Perhaps there would be a larger market than that for manufactured drop/aeros if they were made. But they aren't because people will argue drop bars are fine the way they are, even though people wind up bolting areos onto them anyway.
Happy Feet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-17, 04:36 PM   #47
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,730
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 519 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
My latest incarnation are drops flipped and chopped like bullhorns. After riding for a while I realized on my semi upright bike I rarely used the drops but liked the buttress of the hoods which the uptick in the flipped bar provides. At the same time I wanted to try shellacing (sp?) cork bar tape. I'll post a pic later today as I'm off to work now.
One or two days later but...

This allows me to use the flats, hoods and rest my arms across the bars/HB bag like aeros. I'm not entirely satisfied with the wrap job (but do like the shellac) as I added the mirror and cork afterward and the bar tape doesn't cover them neatly. I'll eventually re wrap them better. With cut off drops one package of bar tape allows me to double wrap the bars.

Happy Feet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-17, 05:01 PM   #48
justMatthew
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 24
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
i prefer Bullhorns.. like Happy Feet posted..
justMatthew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-17, 07:15 PM   #49
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Cilo Dura-Ace 12 Speed Road Bike
Posts: 2,991
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
My favorite bars which I have on two of my bikes (and should have put them on a third but got a similar but cheaper option) are the Zipp Service Course SL-70 Ergo. I like the multiple positions it provides and the comfort in the drops in the rare times I am in them and most importantly the comfort on the tops which is due in huge part to the flat top profile.

I am curious to try Thomson's Aero Road Bar which looks to be similar and might hopefully end up on their adventure bars as well.

I dig the idea of a Butterfly Trekking bar but sadly not many options for them especially not much in 31.8 in higher end options if anything. Jones Loop and Moloko would probably be my jam for a dirt/MTB tourer but not as much on road.
veganbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-17, 09:21 PM   #50
meyers66
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Ping Chen City Taiwan ROC
Bikes: Bianchi Volpe
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I'm interested in Jones bars too

Quote:
Originally Posted by baldilocks View Post
I love my Jones H loop bars.
Hi
Thanks for the photo. I've been interested in Jones bars on a mountain bike frame too. Good topic. I'm curious on your comparison or if they work on a touring frame or an all round bike for a 50 yo. Thanks in advance
meyers66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:44 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION