Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Cantilever brakes for heavy weight touring?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Cantilever brakes for heavy weight touring?

Old 12-06-17, 02:03 AM
  #1  
raria
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 908
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 759 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Cantilever brakes for heavy weight touring?

Hi,

I have this touring bike Fuji Bikes | 2009 Touring | Bike Archives which comes with Tektro Oryx cantilever brakes.

I've done plenty of over night tours with it so only had about 10-15 on the rear panniers nothing up front and the brakes handle nicely, quite sufficient.

Now I want to do a week+ long tour on this bike so I'll need to load up with 40+ pounds.

Is this recommended with Cantilever brakes? Any suggestions/recommendations for a better brake set or pads?

I weight 175 pounds so in total there will be well over 210+ pounds on the bike.
raria is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 04:40 AM
  #2  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 3,156

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 810 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 73 Times in 54 Posts
why not? i did many tens of thousands of miles loaded touring
with cantilever brakes. heavily loaded. like bike and me
and 4 bags and trailer and 5 gallons water and way way way
too much stuff.

you've linked to a tour bike designed with that brake system,
built for heavy touring with rear rack and low rider mounts.
40 pounds should be no problem, but think about moving some
weight forward, don't want it all on the rear.

get some new high-performancy brake pads and clean the rims.
and then load it up and go for a spin, see how it handles.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 07:06 AM
  #3  
raria
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 908
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 759 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Sure I'll do a test ride

Thanks so your experience was good. Any downsides to Canti compares to disc brakes?

I'm curious what people thought who done say a 500 mile tour with cantilever brakes
Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
why not? i did many tens of thousands of miles loaded touring
with cantilever brakes. heavily loaded. like bike and me
and 4 bags and trailer and 5 gallons water and way way way
too much stuff.

you've linked to a tour bike designed with that brake system,
built for heavy touring with rear rack and low rider mounts.
40 pounds should be no problem, but think about moving some
weight forward, don't want it all on the rear.

get some new high-performancy brake pads and clean the rims.
and then load it up and go for a spin, see how it handles.
raria is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 07:21 AM
  #4  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 3,156

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 810 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 73 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by raria View Post
Thanks so your experience was good. Any downsides to Canti compares to disc brakes?

I'm curious what people thought who done say a 500 mile tour with cantilever brakes
tour distance don't make no nevermind really. a 50-mile tour in the alps
will be more enllightening than a thousand-mile ride across the nullarbor.
i pulled that heavy load with trailer around australia, and all around new
zealand. went with 4 bags in the alps. didn't exactly stop on a dime,
but it stopped...........eventually.

they can be a little finicky to get adjusted properly, but that seems to be
true for all brake systems.

you might want to "upgrade" to v-brakes....have to ask the experts if the
braze-on studs are spaced correctly, and if the brake levers will work.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 07:31 AM
  #5  
BigAura
 
BigAura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chapin, SC
Posts: 3,420

Bikes: all steel stable: surly world troller, paris sport fixed, fuji ss

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 621 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 29 Posts
Kool-Stop brake pads are excellent and I'd recommend them for easier setup & better stopping power.

I used them with canti-brakes for my US coast-to-coast tour and they work fine.

The next year I switched to V-brakes (with Kool-Stop too) and that improved my stopping power, even more.

Personally I'd recommend upgrading to V-brakes BUT you'll need doing something with your brifters, like ditch them and get bar-ends

Last edited by BigAura; 12-06-17 at 07:41 AM.
BigAura is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 07:37 AM
  #6  
raria
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 908
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 759 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
didn't exactly stop on a dime,
but it stopped...........eventually.

you might want to "upgrade" to v-brakes....have to ask the experts if the
braze-on studs are spaced correctly, and if the brake levers will work.
That's interesting you mention "upgrade" to v-brakes. I always found v-brakes to be the best brakes (nearly as good as my 5800 caliper brakes but always thought they were meant for cheap bikes.

I have STI's on that bike older Tiagra (I believe 4500) so v-brakes will be tough to set up. Maybe mini-v brakes.

Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
Kool-Stop brake pads are excellent and I'd recommend them for easier setup & better stopping power.
Thanks. Kool-stop are on my list.
raria is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 07:42 AM
  #7  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 42,795

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7387 Post(s)
Liked 1,000 Times in 630 Posts
Mine have been fine for decades..

all types , some have longer arms, some are more compact.. longer front shorter rear , for heel clearance is done..

the Alps on your tour route?


[Been using cantilever brakes on all my touring bikes, , for over 30 years]






....

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-14-17 at 11:07 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 07:51 AM
  #8  
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 1,914

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 31 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by raria View Post
That's interesting you mention "upgrade" to v-brakes. I always found v-brakes to be the best brakes (nearly as good as my 5800 caliper brakes but always thought they were meant for cheap bikes.

I have STI's on that bike older Tiagra (I believe 4500) so v-brakes will be tough to set up. Maybe mini-v brakes.



Thanks. Kool-stop are on my list.
Older shimano brifters have enough cable pull to make mini vee's work. You just need to find the shortest arms possible. I don't know which are currently the shortest so you'll need to do your research. I used to have shimano mini vee brakes (can't remember the code) which were heavy, cheap and stopped extremely well. They were grabby though and I had Sram brifters so I had to use travel agents to make them work in the first place.
If you decide to go the Mini Vee way you may still need to use travel agents but while they are gimmicky and requires extra cleaning, as long as you replace your brake cable often enough (once a year to be safe) you should be more than ok with them.

As for what I would not recommend, stay away from Avid Shorty ultimates. They are by far the worst brake I've used. They do have some power but are a total bi*** to maintain and keep centered. The centering system is cool and innovative and all but it's also a recipe for broken threads and no brakes on the middle of the road. And the friction system they employ does not hold so you need adjust them frequently.

And due to the arm shape, they are extremely difficult to get the pads centered so that they are not at an angle against the rim. I suppose I could use a whole working day twiddling with them and still not get it right because the pad attatchment system just sucks so bad.
Or my rims are too wide. That's actually also a possibility but honestly if a brake can't handle wide rims then it's a dud from the beginning.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 08:01 AM
  #9  
Ajkollme
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 152

Bikes: SuperSix, Nature Boy, Mattioli R1, Burley Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I highly recommend TRP mini v brakes. I have them on a few of my bikes, including my tandem. They are easy to set up and are made to work with road levers without having to use travel agents.


It looks like you have Shimano, so you would need the CX9 (optimized to work with Shimano), versus the CX8.4, which is designed to work with SRAM / Campy (and is what I use). Here's a link:


https://www.amazon.com/TRP-Linear-Pu.../dp/B0064HLN18
Ajkollme is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 08:07 AM
  #10  
raria
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 908
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 759 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Whooo

Now this is why I stay on this forum. Some of you guys are just encyclopedias! Your wife may not appreciate your knowledge but most of us here do.

So will the mini v brakes be much better than my cantilever brakes in terms of stopping power?



Originally Posted by Ajkollme View Post
I highly recommend TRP mini v brakes. I have them on a few of my bikes, including my tandem. They are easy to set up and are made to work with road levers without having to use travel agents.


It looks like you have Shimano, so you would need the CX9 (optimized to work with Shimano), versus the CX8.4, which is designed to work with SRAM / Campy (and is what I use). Here's a link:


https://www.amazon.com/TRP-Linear-Pu.../dp/B0064HLN18
raria is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 08:16 AM
  #11  
Darth_Firebolt
Pokemon Master
 
Darth_Firebolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,106

Bikes: 2017 Breezer Radar Pro, 2016 Salsa Colossal, 1987 Bridgestone 550, 1985 Schwinn High Sierra x3

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by raria View Post
Now this is why I stay on this forum. Some of you guys are just encyclopedias! Your wife may not appreciate your knowledge but most of us here do.

So will the mini v brakes be much better than my cantilever brakes in terms of stopping power?
Yes. I upgraded my Tricross from cantis to mini-v's and it stoppies like a mountain bike. I have the older sora, uhhh 3400?
Darth_Firebolt is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 08:32 AM
  #12  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 27,026
Mentioned: 192 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11426 Post(s)
Liked 3,075 Times in 1,705 Posts
I have descended plenty of western mountain passes and steep hills in the east on my large, heavy LHT with my 210 lb. body and heavy loads. Oryx cantis that came on the bike never worried me. Have upgraded to Kool Stop mountain salmon pads.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 08:46 AM
  #13  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 3,156

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 810 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 73 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
... doing something with your brifters, like ditch them and get bar-ends
bar ends? crazy talk!
too exposed, too many parts.
downtube shifters is where it's at, man.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 09:26 AM
  #14  
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,360

Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 6 Posts
Cantilever brakes, properly set up, are fine for loaded touring. (Emphasis on the set up!) I have cantilever brakes on both of my touring bikes: one has 32 year old cantilever brake technology, the other, 13.

But if I were to get a new touring bike today, I would seriously consider V-brakes or disc brakes. Both offer greater stopping power and braking control than cantilevers.

On the other hand, I have always managed to brake before running into something with cantilever brakes, even when descending mountain passes while riding a loaded bike.
acantor is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 09:39 AM
  #15  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,209

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3631 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 39 Posts
Grr, I missed out on that exact bike on CL for $250 last week by a couple hours!

I weigh about 215# without bags, and didnt have any real concerns on cantis on one of my previous bikes. I did change to V brakes, only because I accidentally bought wrong levers when I rebuilt it, and will say they are MUCH nicer. The cantis worked, though, they're going on another build that I'm halfway contemplating touring on next summer. As others have said, Kool Stops really do make a difference.
jefnvk is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 09:51 AM
  #16  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 10,359
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1632 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 221 Posts
Raria, you ask the question as if cantis don't work, but they work fine. I suspect every one of us here have toured on loaded touring bikes with cantis for decades in all kinds of terrain, with no problems, I know I have.

Good pads, properly set up cantis, keeping pads and rim clean of grit after rain riding, proper braking technique, using common sense of judging your braking ability and conditions, and you are set to go.

Don't over think this, cantis work fine.
Yes, disc work great, but again, cantis work so just get out there and enjoy yourself, your braking system is not going to change things.

Just remember, brake harder with your front brake to slow down properly, no matter the system.
djb is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 10:04 AM
  #17  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 5,971

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1223 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 210 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
Raria, you ask the question as if cantis don't work, but they work fine. I suspect every one of us here have toured on loaded touring bikes with cantis for decades in all kinds of terrain, with no problems, I know I have.

Good pads, properly set up cantis, keeping pads and rim clean of grit after rain riding, proper braking technique, using common sense of judging your braking ability and conditions, and you are set to go.

Don't over think this, cantis work fine.
Yes, disc work great, but again, cantis work so just get out there and enjoy yourself, your braking system is not going to change things.

Just remember, brake harder with your front brake to slow down properly, no matter the system.

+1


I know it's early winter, and since it's hard to get out and ride we all sit down and surf the web, look at new stuff, imagine trying something out, etc., etc. Come next spring, it'll be time to get out on the road and RIDE! Don't fall prey to analysis paralysis.


But if money is burning a hole in your pocket, sure, go spend some.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 10:17 AM
  #18  
prairiepedaler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Jolly 'ol Winnipeg
Posts: 849

Bikes: BRC Explorer 43lb'er, Raleigh Elkhorn, Cannondale SM600, Maruishi MT18 Frame, Sekine Toledo Frame

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 41 Posts
Those who design frames / bicycles build them for canti use specifically for clearance but also because they'll stop the bike adequately. Never seen v-Brakes on a touring frame before, but have seen dual pivot side-pulls. Some canti designs are better in terms of set-up ease, build quality and application of force to the rims than others. From what I've read, the avid shorty ultimates are a top shelf modern cantilever. If I was going on a long far-away tour I'd give those a close look as an upgrade.
prairiepedaler is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 10:23 AM
  #19  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 6,970

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1743 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 220 Times in 184 Posts
I have gone down many 8 to 12 percent grade hills with a fully loaded touring bike with Nashbar canti brakes that were essentially a copy of Oryx brakes. Not a problem. The pads I used on that tour are in the first photo. I changed pads when I got home, there was not a lot of pad left on them at the end of the trip.

Braking improves with Koolstop Salmon pads.

I personally find that canti brakes and V brakes are roughly comparable, but canti brakes have to be set up the first time with the right amount of straddle cable to work at their best potential. But many on this board have a strong preference for V brakes over canti brakes. In addition to the bikes I have with V brakes I have two with canti brakes and one with vintage centerpull brakes. Set up well and they all work well.

I use mini V brakes on my foldup bike. I find I have to be careful to not pull too hard because the cable pull is such that you have a lot of leverage. But it also means that your brakes have to be adjusted quite well on well trued wheels to avoid brake rub. I do not have fenders on that bike. Mini V brakes might not work on some bikes with fenders.

On two of my touring bikes I use V brakes and regular brake levers, I use Travel Agents to compensate for the different cable pull. They look a bit funky but they work fine. Photos show what I mean, the silver thing in the second photo is the Travel Agent. A friend of mine uses full size V brakes on his Bike Friday with brifters, he also uses travel agents on that bike.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
20IMGP1791.JPG (315.0 KB, 369 views)
File Type: jpg
20IMGP2544.JPG (309.6 KB, 372 views)
File Type: jpg
20IMGP3677.JPG (329.1 KB, 369 views)
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 10:39 AM
  #20  
Eggman84
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: SoCal
Posts: 441

Bikes: 2014 Bruce Gordon Rock&Road, 1995 Santana Visa Tandem, 1990 Trek 520, 2012 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Cantilevers, V-brakes, side pull, and disk brakes will all stop a bike if properly setup. Conversely, they will also all fail to stop you on a dime in the right conditions. I find everyone's answer to what is the one and only brake proven to work is based on anecdotal evidence (i.e., I was flying down a hill at xxx mph, when a unicorn jumped out in front of me, and I had to stop in zzz feet).

I have cantis' on both a touring bike and tandem, both of which I have used for fully self contained touring. On the tandem, I have not had any problem stopping, though on long downhills I have stopped occasionally to let the rims cool. Don't know if it was necessary but seemed prudent and the scenery was lovely. I have short arm Vee-brakes on my wife's touring bike, and they seem to stop just fine as well.

The only real limitation I know of for all rim brakes is that when the rims are wet, it takes longer to stop. Disk brakes don't have this limitation. I'll leave it up to others to decide what type of brake works best for them.

Karl
Eggman84 is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 10:55 AM
  #21  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,448

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4081 Post(s)
Liked 1,054 Times in 677 Posts
Originally Posted by raria View Post
So will the mini v brakes be much better than my cantilever brakes in terms of stopping power?
Canti brakes, when set up properly, will stop you just fine each and every time.
I weigh 230 which alone is more than you plus your gear and canti brake bikes stop me just fine coming down hills on pavement and gravel. I have never felt out of control or concerned I wont stop in time.

With that said, I also havent ridden down some 6 mile long mountain descent with loaded gear. I doubt I would feel like I couldnít stop, but perhaps I would need to ride the brakes a lot more than normal and a bit harder. I wouldnít think twice about using my current touring bike though, and I am hardly a risk seeking adrenaline junky.

Your stock brakes are an entry level type that are noted for a lack of easy adjustability. There are a number of quality canti brakes that are more expensive and allow for better/easier adjustability in setup, but if your brakes are set up properly, they will work just as well as the more expensive options.



Quality brake pads make a huge difference as the pads on entry level brakes are typically hard and made for long use at the expense of fast stopping.


Vbrakes are really easy to set up, which is the best thing about them. They can lock up wheels really easily, and people view that as a benefit, but I think its something that is a positive and a negative. Sure, its easy to brake, but the modulation is terrible. I donít always want to go from full speed to a skidding stop. Canti brakes inherently allow for more modulation since they donít lock up the wheel quite as quickly as vbrakes.



Really though you plus bag weight is less than what I alone weigh. 20minute long fully loaded mountain descents are about the only place I could see properly set up canti brake bikes lacking- and thatís only compared to disc brakes.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 11:04 AM
  #22  
GamblerGORD53
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Elevation 666m Edmonton Canada
Posts: 1,510

Bikes: 2013 Custom SA5w / Rohloff Tourster

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 38 Posts
OR you can get a Sturmey Archer dyno drum front hub and do laps around the world with NO adjustments or pads. Mine has 23,000 miles with just a bearing change at 17,000. It works rain or snow, hot or cold on my 290 lb heavyweight. Crashing or baggage handler bashing has ZERO effect. I'll use my travel agent to book the flights on Cathay Pacific. LOL
GamblerGORD53 is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 11:28 AM
  #23  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,691
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 57 Posts
I have done a coast to coast (Trans America route miles 4200+) and several other long (1000 +/- mile) tours on the same brakes you have. They were with various loads ranging from 30-55 pounds and the brakes worked well. I ran Avid pads when the original ones wore out.
__________________
Check out my profile, articles, and trip journals at:
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/staehpj1
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 11:28 AM
  #24  
JaccoW
Tinkerer
 
JaccoW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Posts: 1,477

Bikes: Batavus Randonneur GL, Gazelle Orange Excellent, Gazelle Super Licht, Gazelle Grand Tourist

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 465 Post(s)
Liked 346 Times in 220 Posts
The 90mm XL version I presume?

I like drums though they 'might' be more prone to overheating during long descents. I have never experienced that though.

One thing I personally don't like about V-brakes is the thinner pads compared to cantis. In wet/gritty condition this means you will wear through them much sooner.
Other than that... Try the cantis. They're not much better or worse than v-brakes.
JaccoW is offline  
Old 12-06-17, 01:33 PM
  #25  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 22,731

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3363 Post(s)
Liked 817 Times in 515 Posts
Originally Posted by raria View Post
Thanks so your experience was good. Any downsides to Canti compares to disc brakes?

I'm curious what people thought who done say a 500 mile tour with cantilever brakes
The better question would be are there any upsides to disc brakes? Frankly, I would say no. I have just about every brake you'll find in common use for the last 20 years on a variety of bikes: disc, linear and cantilever. There isn't one of them that doesn't work just as well as the others.

I think the real key is that my brakes have always been set up like what many people experience for the first time with disc brakes, i.e. a short lever pull and quick actuation. Lots of bikes are set up so the brakes don't actuate until half lever pull. I've always found this to result in poor braking. Hub mounted discs set up this way result in really poor braking.

Keep the brakes tight and lever movement relatively minimal and most any brake will work properly.

Originally Posted by Eggman84 View Post
The only real limitation I know of for all rim brakes is that when the rims are wet, it takes longer to stop. Disk brakes don't have this limitation.
Braking in wet weather takes longer to stop on all brake systems. Stopping distance isn't determined by the brake mechanism but by the friction you can develop between the tire and the road. It make take a little longer to clear the water between the rim and a rim brake pad than with a hub mounted disc but, honestly, the difference is minimal in my experience. I can still stop in the rain just about as well with any brake.

Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
As for what I would not recommend, stay away from Avid Shorty ultimates. They are by far the worst brake I've used. They do have some power but are a total bi*** to maintain and keep centered. The centering system is cool and innovative and all but it's also a recipe for broken threads and no brakes on the middle of the road. And the friction system they employ does not hold so you need adjust them frequently.

And due to the arm shape, they are extremely difficult to get the pads centered so that they are not at an angle against the rim. I suppose I could use a whole working day twiddling with them and still not get it right because the pad attatchment system just sucks so bad.
Or my rims are too wide. That's actually also a possibility but honestly if a brake can't handle wide rims then it's a dud from the beginning.
I haven't used the Avid Shorty Ultimates but I have used Avid Shortys. I'm not a fan either. They were the squealiest brakes I've ever used. Every brake application called forth the Banshee

About the best cantilever I've used is Paul's. I have several sets. They are easy to set up and center. Yes, they cost a bit more but they are worth the money.

Originally Posted by raria View Post
Thanks. Kool-stop are on my list.
I would suggest Koolstop dual compound pads over straight salmon pads. They seem to cut down on the squeal of Avid Shorty's pretty well and have worked really well with my Pauls
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.