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Flatbar to Drop bars conversion for touring

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Flatbar to Drop bars conversion for touring

Old 07-24-18, 09:58 PM
  #1  
thebabyorange69
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Hybrid flatbar to Drop bars conversion for touring & other q

Hello people,

I am planning on doing my first tour soon from Calgary to Regina but I will probably first go Calgary - Banff to test my bike, any suggestions? where do you people plan your routes

is it reasonable for my first time to do it solo? What extra gear would I need apart from knowing how to fix my bike?


so I have had my bike for almost 4 months (biking season is short here in canada)

and I notice that I feel that it would be more comfortable to ride longer distances with drop bars (preferably ) or even butterfly,

now my question is if it is possible? would the change will alter the geometry of the bike?

now I will have to buy the drop bars, I was thinking on buying some of those used shimano 105 shifters but I really do not know anything about compatibility about those ? what are your thoughts about this?

I have a shimano 105 RD5800 for the rear and shimano a Tiagra R453 for the front

Yeah and also I will change those pedals

thank you

mon velo:
i.imgur.com/Sr8AIx6.jpg

Last edited by thebabyorange69; 07-25-18 at 03:43 PM.
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Old 07-25-18, 08:39 AM
  #2  
Happy Feet
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I have ridden Calgary to Banff several times and like it, though others say they don't so much.

For planning I use google maps. I plan using car mode but switch to bike mode to see elevation profiles (I don't trust the routing in bike mode as it gets bizarre and the time estimates are way out). Also use satellite and street view to check out stuff like shops or what intersections look like.

I like Hwy 1. Although it is busy it has good large shoulders all the way. The only part to watch are on/off ramps and a mirror helps a lot there. Just doing a shoulder check is not good enough. It gets more scenic as you approach the mountains but it's about 130km's to Banff which is a longish day for a new rider so consider that. You could stop at Canmore too. There are long rolling hills (not too big though) and you usually hit a good head wind in Kananaskis country but that drops away after Lac Des Arcs and there is a new bike path from Canmore to Banff. It is always nice to get up the longish Scott Hill, have lunch and then coast down into the mountains. Beautiful!

The other option is the 1a from Bowness through Cochrane to Lac Des Arcs where it then rejoins the Hwy 1. Quieter, also scenic but with narrower shoulders so you have to decide if you want less traffic with close passes or more traffic with wide passes. I choose the latter.

I've also done east to Regina. Rolling hills, wide open scenery, wind. There are enough small towns for supplies but don't expect luxury and do some google maps searching as many small services off the beaten path are no longer open even if they are shown.

You will definately want multiple hand positions for such long prairie rides so either add bar ends, a trekking bar or drop bars. Can't help with the conversion as I don't know those shifters but someone will.
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Old 07-25-18, 10:38 AM
  #3  
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Some communities have a bike coop or a bike charity that accepts used bikes that they fix up for discounted sales to the poor. Often those places have bins of used parts for sale at a good price. I have bought used handlebars, stems, brake levers, etc. at such places.

Drop bars - when your hands are on the brake hoods, your hands are quite a bit foreward of the steerer tube (the tube that connects your stem and fork together is the steerer tube). But your hand positions on flat bars are usually much closer to the saddle than on drop bars. Therefore, if you make the change you might find that you have to lean much further forward than you had planned on. A really short stem can fix some of that, handlebars that have a short reach can fix some of it too. But you might not find it to work out the way you want.

A friend of mine used to use drop bars, but he never used the drop position on the drop bars, thus that part of the handlebar was useless to him. He set up his touring bike with bar end shifters on bull horn bars, I attached a photo. They ride very much like riding on the hoods of the brake levers on drop bars. I prefer drop bars but in strong headwinds or fast downhills I use the drops to have a more aero position.

The butterfly type bars that you are also considering would likely mean that the bike would ride the same with the same forward reach. Depending on how you configure the bars, you might need a longer stem too.

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Old 07-26-18, 08:25 PM
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Flat bar to drop bar conversion

I have tranzx bar ends on my tandem and single and find them very comfortable.

If you want a lower position on the bars you could also fit a slightly longer stem. They are quite reasonably priced.

Mike
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Old 07-27-18, 01:08 PM
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flat to trekking bars , you don't need all new levers and cables, you keep them.
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Old 08-04-18, 10:05 AM
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The Jones Loop H Bar is also a great multi position alternative to a flat bar. Doesn't require a control change, might require longer cables. I've used them for the last 7 Ragbrai's and they make a great long distance bar.
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Old 08-05-18, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by thebabyorange69 View Post
Hello
or even butterfly,

now my question is if it is possible? would the change will alter the geometry of the bike?

mistake
dont do it.
not just beer,
changing flat to drop is also a mistake.

butterfly bars are ok
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Old 08-05-18, 08:19 PM
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Changing from flat bars to drop bars is not a mistake if that's what you want. It's what I wanted, so I did it, and I'm happy I did.
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Old 08-05-18, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by FromBeyond View Post
Changing from flat bars to drop bars is not a mistake if that's what you want. It's what I wanted, so I did it, and I'm happy I did.

How did the change of a 95 schwin alter the geometry?
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It moved the balance point forward, and made you more likely to go over the handlebars.

Ride your bike as it was designed by the experts, not as the beer guy says
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Old 08-05-18, 08:55 PM
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Yep, I've got about $200 invested into my "gravel bike", and it works better than stock, and I'm proud of that. You don't have to spend a thousand dollars to have a functional bicycle.
As for moving the COG forward, sure it does (a little bit). But you can move your COG backward by moving your butt back off the seat and straightening your arms out. Just like you do on any bicycle any time you go down a steep hill. Even with drop bars you can go down stairs or steep hills without going over the bars unless you grab a handful of front brake while doing so. Or if you're like me and you still haven't perfected the art of the endo
There are all kinds of videos on youtube of guys doing amazing things on road bikes; drop bars will not make your bicycle totally incapable. "Road bike party"
If you're not happy with flat bars, and you think drop bars might be more comfortable for long rides, you're not alone. You can find conversion videos on youtube, but it looks like your bike might already have a 31.8 stem which would make a drop conversion super easy.

Edit: And, if you use the same size stem, it doesn't move your COG fwd at all if you ride in the upright position. Drop bars are just versatile like that.

Last edited by FromBeyond; 08-05-18 at 09:17 PM.
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Old 08-05-18, 11:06 PM
  #11  
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https://salsacycles.com/bikes/marrak...deore_drop_bar
https://salsacycles.com/bikes/marrak..._flatbar_deore

Why does the flat bar marrakesh have different geometry than the drop bar Marrakesh?

真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真真

Bike fit is the most important part of a touring bike. If you are comfortable on your bike you might just enjoy your tour.
Second guessing the people that make bikes cost you safety and comfort, and money when you have to put yor bike back the way it was supposed to be. Most anything works rolling around Green Lake. When you get to Rancho Grande you can tell the difference.

Butterfly touring bars are made to replace flat bars, and made with flat bar frame geometry in mind, in mind by professionals.

Shade tree just dont work for the long run.

By the way, it is not just the stem length, but, the width and sweep of the bars that make or break a bike fit.

Last edited by chrisx; 08-05-18 at 11:40 PM.
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