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Setting up my hammock on the ground

Old 05-24-20, 06:22 PM
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mtnbud
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Setting up my hammock on the ground

I wanted to see what it'd take to set up my hammock on the ground. I'd need a couple extra stakes and guylines, a ground cloth, and a sleeping pad rather than an underquilt.


Front of bike is stabilized with two guylines and stakes.

Front wheel lifts the mosquito netting away from the feet.

I rigged up an adjustable ridgeline under my mosquito netting. It had to be tightened to lift the mosquito netting up.


Minimal head room.

with rainfly.

Would be tough crawling under the rainfly. Would be a good idea to raise the head end up higher if possible

Last edited by mtnbud; 05-24-20 at 07:47 PM.
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Old 05-24-20, 06:40 PM
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So basically it's a tent ?
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Old 05-24-20, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
So basically it's a tent ?
🤔Kind of, sort of. 😋

As a tent, there are much better choices out there. It's good to know a hammock can be set up on the ground when there are no trees around! 👍
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Old 05-24-20, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
I wanted to see what it'd take to set up my hammock on the ground. I'd need a couple extra stakes and guylines, a ground cloth, and a sleeping pad rather than an underquilt.


Front of bike is stabilized with two guylines and stakes.

Front wheel lifts the mosquito netting away from the feet.

I rigged up an adjustable ridgeline under my mosquito netting. It had to be tightened to lift the mosquito netting up.


Minimal head room.

with rainfly.

Would be tough crawling under the rainfly. Would be a good idea to raise the head end up higher if possible
Hey that's exactly how my looks when it's in my rectangular dome tent except there are no guy-lines holding the bike up.

Years ago there was a tent made specifically for bicyclists and that tent used the front and rear wheels to support the tent. The wheels each fitted into a pocket on the tent. Something like the wheel at the end of this Topeak tent except the tent used a wheel off the bike to support each end.

https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-gea...bikamper-tent/



Cheers
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Old 05-25-20, 10:50 AM
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Got a campsite in Darthmouth MA, way south coast, sight unseen. Open field, hammock, picnic table 1 tree. Hmmm. Lots of big rocks everywhere. Used the tree and the picnic table for hammock ends. And quite a few rocks to weigh down the table to keep from moving or tipping, worked fine.
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Old 05-25-20, 10:56 AM
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That's why there are tents.
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Old 05-25-20, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
Got a campsite in Darthmouth MA, way south coast, sight unseen. Open field, hammock, picnic table 1 tree. Hmmm. Lots of big rocks everywhere. Used the tree and the picnic table for hammock ends. And quite a few rocks to weigh down the table to keep from moving or tipping, worked fine.
It probably took you longer to secure your hammock than it would have to pitch a tent.

Another thing I like about my free-standing rectangular dome tent is that I can pick it up and move a bit it if I don't like the location it's in once it's set up. I do stake the tent if it's windy.

Again, there are advantages an disadvantages to both tents and hammocks depending on your needs/wants. I'd hate to be camping in Northern Ontario, Canada during black fly season if all I had was a hammock.

Cheers
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Old 05-26-20, 11:05 AM
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I posted this on another thread. To make it solid, you will need good anchors for the bike tie outs. I will be using Orange Screws for softer ground, and Boomstakes for harder ground. This setup will allow me to hang with only one tree, table, pole, in addition to the bike.

To get the tarp line a bit higher on the bike end, I used my Click Stand pole.




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Old 05-26-20, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I posted this on another thread. To make it solid, you will need good anchors for the bike tie outs. I will be using Orange Screws for softer ground, and Boomstakes for harder ground. This setup will allow me to hang with only one tree, table, pole, in addition to the bike.

To get the tarp line a bit higher on the bike end, I used my Click Stand pole.




Very cool! Does it put much stress on the wheels when you lay in the hammock?
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Old 05-26-20, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
Very cool! Does it put much stress on the wheels when you lay in the hammock?
No, the majority of the stress is not at a downward direction, most of the stress is taken by the straps.
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Old 05-26-20, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
No, the majority of the stress is not at a downward direction, most of the stress is taken by the straps.
Very cool! I'm going to have to try that!
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Old 05-26-20, 08:32 PM
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Look I love Hammocks but a ground hammock just isn't the move. It's like saying "hey there's pizza" and you get there and it is toast with tomato sauce. Technically it works but that ain't pizza.
If I am going out and I know I won't have hammock access I will just take my tent and if I am doing a supported trip I try to take both unless I know, no chance of hammock.
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Old 05-27-20, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Look I love Hammocks but a ground hammock just isn't the move. It's like saying "hey there's pizza" and you get there and it is toast with tomato sauce. Technically it works but that ain't pizza.
If I am going out and I know I won't have hammock access I will just take my tent and if I am doing a supported trip I try to take both unless I know, no chance of hammock.
The issue is that you don't always know in advance you won't have a place to hang the hammock, and going to ground is at least an option to have a place to sleep, despite it being less than ideal. No worse really than a one man bivvy/tent. I have ran into places where despite being lots of trees and piles, they wouldn't let you hang, anything.

Any yeah, going to ground with a hammock is annoying too say the least.

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Old 05-27-20, 11:18 AM
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Ive set up my hammock once on the ground. The reason was we were at a park somewhere where there was a clearing where we were set up in (ham radio Field Day) and the only trees were either in thick brush/weeds/poison ivy outside the clearing or across a road. So I opted for testing out the ground-pitching.

I had some military tent poles for use as antennas or mast sections so I grabbed 4 of them and put 2 on each end. Then I stretched 2 guy lines off each one plus the hammock as the third between both poles.

You definitely want a ground cover and pads are the only way to go on the ground.

Aside from that, there is no difference between a hammock and a tent as far as setting up on the ground goes - you're on the ground. That is the biggest benefit to a hammock - that you are off the ground. But, in a pinch, you can set up on the ground.

I have been looking for ways to hang when there aren't any trees. I like the bike set up as a partial support. However, that doesn't seem high enough. If the ground slopes I suppose it could work better.

The ground anchors are one concern - what will hold up to the tension and not loosen up over-night? Or if the ground is dry then it rains over-night and loosens up - are you going to hit the ground?

The upright supports are the other concern. The uprights are going to transfer some force down. Without a wide foot print to spread out that load on dirt the supports (in the case of a pole, lets say) will push the poles in to the ground - loosening up the hammock suspension.

For ground-dwelling in a hammock - if you are going to be confined to that - perhaps riding around to find some wood long enough to get you 2 poles would be worth-while. That way you can get some extra height. That is as opposed to the bike and wheel method in the OP.

My A frame tent is a good example of the extra height - it is OK to lay down in, but as an adult and trying to lean up to get dressed etc the tent is too short for one, and for two the sides angling up to the peak mean there isn't any shoulder room in there. I took it on my first backpacking trip with temps below freezing at night. Between that with frost and some mornings with a lot of dew - you end up getting cold and wet from the condensation once you bump the tent. So higher and more room is important. Same goes for the hammock. If you can get the bug netting up away from you that will give you a good a mount of room there (considering the confines of a hammock, usually). Then if your tarp is hung higher and you have some room to partially stand up outside of the netting, or at least kneel on the ground with your back straight, that will help tremendously - especially if its raining and you need to cook or you're getting up in the morning to get dressed.
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Old 05-27-20, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
Ive set up my hammock once on the ground. The reason was we were at a park somewhere where there was a clearing where we were set up in (ham radio Field Day) and the only trees were either in thick brush/weeds/poison ivy outside the clearing or across a road. So I opted for testing out the ground-pitching.

I had some military tent poles for use as antennas or mast sections so I grabbed 4 of them and put 2 on each end. Then I stretched 2 guy lines off each one plus the hammock as the third between both poles.

You definitely want a ground cover and pads are the only way to go on the ground.

Aside from that, there is no difference between a hammock and a tent as far as setting up on the ground goes - you're on the ground. That is the biggest benefit to a hammock - that you are off the ground. But, in a pinch, you can set up on the ground.

I have been looking for ways to hang when there aren't any trees. I like the bike set up as a partial support. However, that doesn't seem high enough. If the ground slopes I suppose it could work better.

The ground anchors are one concern - what will hold up to the tension and not loosen up over-night? Or if the ground is dry then it rains over-night and loosens up - are you going to hit the ground?

The upright supports are the other concern. The uprights are going to transfer some force down. Without a wide foot print to spread out that load on dirt the supports (in the case of a pole, lets say) will push the poles in to the ground - loosening up the hammock suspension.

For ground-dwelling in a hammock - if you are going to be confined to that - perhaps riding around to find some wood long enough to get you 2 poles would be worth-while. That way you can get some extra height. That is as opposed to the bike and wheel method in the OP.

My A frame tent is a good example of the extra height - it is OK to lay down in, but as an adult and trying to lean up to get dressed etc the tent is too short for one, and for two the sides angling up to the peak mean there isn't any shoulder room in there. I took it on my first backpacking trip with temps below freezing at night. Between that with frost and some mornings with a lot of dew - you end up getting cold and wet from the condensation once you bump the tent. So higher and more room is important. Same goes for the hammock. If you can get the bug netting up away from you that will give you a good a mount of room there (considering the confines of a hammock, usually). Then if your tarp is hung higher and you have some room to partially stand up outside of the netting, or at least kneel on the ground with your back straight, that will help tremendously - especially if its raining and you need to cook or you're getting up in the morning to get dressed.

The two types of anchors I mentions will work fine, and support the weight. They are used by many who use the Tensa system to hang hammocks. As for the hammock being too low, that is why I tested it in the yard. I was able to lay in the hammock without touching the ground. Ideal? No. Better than sleeping not he ground? Yes, much. Once in, you can't tell you are, "too low," it just feels like you are in the hammock. The only real issue is the tarp is much lower and it is more difficult to crawl under to get into the hammock.

I was only looking for a solution to hang when there was only one tree or pole, without adding a lot of additional weight. The only thing I need is two straps, which I generally have on tour anyway. I have some lighter, and still strong tie down straps I take. They are made to tie down loads on trailers, motorcycles, etc., and I trust them completely. I have used them many times to hang my hammock when I needed extra length, and actually used them for a while on a ship to hang a different hammock in my cabin. I didn't like the mattress, so I slept in a hammock instead.

Here are the Orange Screws: https://www.amazon.com/Orange-Screw-...0600358&sr=8-2

Boomstakes are found here. They also sell Orange Screws. https://www.tensaoutdoor.com/product/anchors/
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Old 05-27-20, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
It probably took you longer to secure your hammock than it would have to pitch a tent.

Another thing I like about my free-standing rectangular dome tent is that I can pick it up and move a bit it if I don't like the location it's in once it's set up. I do stake the tent if it's windy.

Again, there are advantages an disadvantages to both tents and hammocks depending on your needs/wants. I'd hate to be camping in Northern Ontario, Canada during black fly season if all I had was a hammock.

Cheers
Correct. Took a bit of time. Got a big agnes tent now for main tour duties.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:25 PM
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The zen philosopher Basho once wrote: A flute with no holes is not a flute, and a hammock with no trees is a tent. Funny guy.
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Old 05-28-20, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
The issue is that you don't always know in advance you won't have a place to hang the hammock, and going to ground is at least an option to have a place to sleep, despite it being less than ideal. No worse really than a one man bivvy/tent. I have ran into places where despite being lots of trees and piles, they wouldn't let you hang, anything.

Any yeah, going to ground with a hammock is annoying too say the least.
Of course but if you plan your spots you can do OK. On one of my last big tours I planned where I was sleeping so I could hammock without being grounded, it worked out quite well.
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Old 05-28-20, 07:05 PM
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Haven't started touring yet, (thought to do this summer but covid), but have both ultralight hammock and ul bivy both with mosquito netting, as well as tarp and sleep bag that can double as quilt. It all seems so light! Watching youtube, I am sold on tarp camping. Besides stakes, I purchased a dozen "fish hooks" so I can pitch on wooden decks or even (I believe) string a hammock in the corner of a chain link fence. No partnering for me as wife refuses any camping.

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Old 05-28-20, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post

That sure looks like an elementary classroom behind your bike!

I did most of my trips in my younger days with a ground cloth and a tarp. I only put up the tarp if there was a chance of rain. It saved quite a bit of space, but wasn't fun when mosquitoes were bad.

I had a issue similar to yours with the angle of my front rack on my 30 year old mountain bike. I ended up extending the lower mounts out by adding a short length of metal.
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Old 05-28-20, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Of course but if you plan your spots you can do OK. On one of my last big tours I planned where I was sleeping so I could hammock without being grounded, it worked out quite well.
Glad you plan so meticulously. I don't. My last tour I woke up each day and decided where to go. Loved it. Even if you do plan, sometimes things go wrong. Either way, I can hang my hammock with only one tree, and sleep in it comfortably.

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Old 05-29-20, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
That sure looks like an elementary classroom behind your bike!

I did most of my trips in my younger days with a ground cloth and a tarp. I only put up the tarp if there was a chance of rain. It saved quite a bit of space, but wasn't fun when mosquitoes were bad.

I had a issue similar to yours with the angle of my front rack on my 30 year old mountain bike. I ended up extending the lower mounts out by adding a short length of metal.
Yep, Kindergarten this year (and hopefully next!)

Older pic. Solved problem by going to an axiom low rider, putting the axioms up front, and the blackburns in the back.
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Old 05-29-20, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
Glad you plan so meticulously. I don't. My last tour I woke up each day and decided where to go. Loved it. Even if you do plan, sometimes things go wrong. Either way, I can hang my hammock with only one tree, and sleep in it comfortably.
I don't always plan so meticulously. Sometimes I just go rambling but I so rarely tour these days aside from the occasional sub 24.
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Old 05-29-20, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
Yep, Kindergarten this year (and hopefully next!)

Older pic. Solved problem by going to an axiom low rider, putting the axioms up front, and the blackburns in the back.
Good to hear.

My wife also teaches Kindergarten. It's getting pretty close to summer break!
I hope you're able to get out and enjoy a trip soon. If the campgrounds don't open up soon, you could always try dispersed camping!
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Old 05-30-20, 12:48 PM
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Consider these options? Tensa Outdoor :

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