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Intro to Touring?

Old 11-30-23, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by JustaJoe
djb and Tourist in MSN I am prepped for the cold, and have ridden my bike at temps as low as 20*F (rare where I live now). I have 2 pieces for my head which allow for normal helmet fitting - a thin yet warm/windproof balaclava, and a water- and wind-proof skull cap. Have some glasses/goggles that work well. Hands and the rest of my body have not been an issue, the only thing I'm still working on is my feet. Between the various wool socks and hiking boots, I just haven't found the perfect combo yet. And I do have rain gear as well, so that's covered.

I am not looking to tour in 20*F temps. Around here, our winter temps are usually in the 40's, low 50's; with overnights in the 30's. Great biking and sleeping weather!

djb not -20*F, just 20*F. That's kind of my limit since I've 1) aged and 2) been in the US South for almost 25 yrs.

indyfabz and Tourist in MSN I appreciate you both mentioning guided tours. I've looked into various trips with ACA, REI, others, and found the cost... costly? But it seems it may well be worthwhile to learn, observe what others are doing, etc. A cross-country trip ain't happening (major respect to you for doing that!), but perhaps a 5-7 day tour would be a good experience. I'll consult the CFO and see what she says.

Silly anecdote: We did an exercise on our main battle tanks where the high temperature got up to -10*F, but was usually around -20*F. You can't really get 50 tons of steel warm in that environment, so we let the engine run continuously and napped on the back deck!
It sounds like you have all bases covered, or know which bases still need to be covered. You are going to be ok.

40s and 50s (F) with nights in the 30s should not be too arduous given your military experience. The Whisperlight stove would work well in the 30s.

You probably already know this, but just in case you don't, phones with a cold Li Ion battery can run down the battery really fast. Leave your phone off unless the phone is warm. When I tour, if the weather is in the 30s or 40s, I warm up my phone inside my clothing for a while before I turn it on, that extends the battery life. I make my call or check the weather forecast or whatever, then shut if off.
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Old 12-01-23, 08:51 AM
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I started touring during college. I didn't ask any of these questions. I just went.
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Old 12-01-23, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan
I started touring during college. I didn't ask any of these questions. I just went.
Seems the discussion about my initial trip thoughts derailed things. Really, I am just curious how others got started. Some have provided great stories/experiences, others lack reading comprehension. Hint, re-read the 1st post.
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Old 12-02-23, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by JustaJoe
Seems the discussion about my initial trip thoughts derailed things. Really, I am just curious how others got started. Some have provided great stories/experiences, others lack reading comprehension. Hint, re-read the 1st post.
You clearly missed my point.

Too much self doubt. Too much tippy toe. Too much story seeking from others. Over planning, over thinking.

I play a bit of music on the side so here's a music analogy: you hear a cool song, you want to play it just the way you heard it. You practice for ages and finally master it. Unfortunately you practiced for so long that you're now bored of the song before you even got a chance to perform it.

Music and touring are about spontaneous discovery, not about getting everything right and ensuring nothing goes wrong.

Last edited by Yan; 12-02-23 at 11:32 AM.
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Old 12-03-23, 06:03 AM
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Some of us were fortunate enough to be taught how to ride a bicycle, camp, and be independant when we were kids.

Times have changed. Not everyone grew up this way. We should be honoured if someone asks us old codgers about our experiences of bicycle touring and for any advice that will help them get out on the road.
Thereís a magical wonderful world out there.
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Old 12-03-23, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by imi
Some of us were fortunate enough to be taught how to ride a bicycle, camp, and be independant when we were kids.

Times have changed. Not everyone grew up this way. We should be honoured if someone asks us old codgers about our experiences of bicycle touring and for any advice that will help them get out on the road.
There’s a magical wonderful world out there.
You have a point. I would question one thing though. Plenty of folks weren't taught that stuff in the past either. I am 72 and plenty of folks my age never were same with many from generations between mine and now. Also some kids are lucky enough to be taught that stuff now.
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Old 12-03-23, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
You have a point. I would question one thing though. Plenty of folks weren't taught that stuff in the past either. I am 72 and plenty of folks my age never were same with many from generations between mine and now. Also some kids are lucky enough to be taught that stuff now.
You have a point too 😊 I feel that those of us that were teenagers in the sixties and seventies had an easier time getting out on the road than generations before and after us… and if there’s any way I can pay that forward, then it’s a privilege to do so.

edit: This is a just a response to people saying "just strap your bag onto a bike and go". Yes, that can still be done of course, but I don't think it's as easy now as then for many reasons. If "overthinking it" is necessary for someone to get out there, then overthink it! Then strap your bags to your bike and go

Last edited by imi; 12-03-23 at 07:28 AM.
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Old 12-03-23, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
You have a point. I would question one thing though. Plenty of folks weren't taught that stuff in the past either. I am 72 and plenty of folks my age never were same with many from generations between mine and now. Also some kids are lucky enough to be taught that stuff now.
Yup. I learned a lot of that stuff in Boy Scouts. I do not have kids, but my nephew's son is also learning that stuff in Boy Scouts now. But I suspect that the majority of kids are not learning how to camp as pre-teenagers now.

It is a lot easier to start bike touring if you already have the camping knowledge and skills. It is possible if you don't have that background but then there is a greater chance of having a bad day and calling it quits forever.
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Old 12-03-23, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
Yup. I learned a lot of that stuff in Boy Scouts. I do not have kids, but my nephew's son is also learning that stuff in Boy Scouts now. But I suspect that the majority of kids are not learning how to camp as pre-teenagers now.

It is a lot easier to start bike touring if you already have the camping knowledge and skills. It is possible if you don't have that background but then there is a greater chance of having a bad day and calling it quits forever.
Ya know, thinking back I really wasn't technically taught the woodsy and camping stuff so much as it came to me because I was a feral child who ran off into the woods any time I saw a chance to escape. I did have brothers and friends who I learned some of it from. Also I was a voracious consumer of any kind of info on wood craft or other woodsy stuff. So books, magazines or whatever on the subject were devoured. Taking to canoe camping, backpacking, hunting and fishing was just kind of automatic.

Biking... Well I was born into a bicycling family. Everyone rode for utilitarian and recreational purposes. There wasn't any avoiding that.

I raised my own kid to know how to do outdoor stuff and have basic skills in other things that folks often don't these days. She started her kids the same way as toddlers hiking, biking and so on. Kids raised to love the outdoors are likely to raise their kids to do the same. The link can be broken though if it isn't passed on or the kid just doesn't take to it.
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Old 12-03-23, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Yan
You clearly missed my point.

Too much self doubt. Too much tippy toe. Too much story seeking from others. Over planning, over thinking.

I play a bit of music on the side so here's a music analogy: you hear a cool song, you want to play it just the way you heard it. You practice for ages and finally master it. Unfortunately you practiced for so long that you're now bored of the song before you even got a chance to perform it.

Music and touring are about spontaneous discovery, not about getting everything right and ensuring nothing goes wrong.
If you don't agree with the premise of this thread, why don't you just ignore it? It's a big world and not everyone thinks like you do
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Old 12-03-23, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
Ya know, thinking back I really wasn't technically taught the woodsy and camping stuff so much as it came to me because I was a feral child who ran off into the woods any time I saw a chance to escape. ...
I think that is expected of youth in rural areas.

I grew up in Minneapolis in the middle of an urban area. There was a swimming beach nearby, learned to swim there but my mother was instrumental in that. I have to credit Boy Scouts for learning how to tie knots other than my shoe laces, build a fire, put up a tent, map and compass, etc. My family did some camping, but that was pretty minimal and included minimal instruction.
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Old 12-03-23, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by john m flores
If you don't agree with the premise of this thread, why don't you just ignore it? It's a big world and not everyone thinks like you do
Except Yan is correct to a certain degree that at some point you need to stop worrying and researching and just go do it. Thatís ultimately the only way to learn how to tour. Do it and find out what works for you.
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Old 12-03-23, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B.
Except Yan is correct to a certain degree that at some point you need to stop worrying and researching and just go do it. Thatís ultimately the only way to learn how to tour. Do it and find out what works for you.
OP asks a simple question that's resulted in people sharing some cool stories about the start of their touring journey.

To throw a bomb ("you're overthinking things") into page 2 of what could grow into a helpful and entertaining thread is not just self-centered, it's exceedingly unfriendly and antisocial. It's done nothing but derail an otherwise good thread.
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Old 12-03-23, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by john m flores
OP asks a simple question that's resulted in people sharing some cool stories about the start of their touring journey.

To throw a bomb ("you're overthinking things") into page 2 of what could grow into a helpful and entertaining thread is not just self-centered, it's exceedingly unfriendly and antisocial. It's done nothing but derail an otherwise good thread.
My take is Yans comment is on the 5 or so follow up posts by the OP. I too had the thought that you can stress out and overthink the process.
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Old 12-03-23, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B.
My take is Yans comment is on the 5 or so follow up posts by the OP. I too had the thought that you can stress out and overthink the process.
It's a fair point. It just seemed needlessly antagonistic in its delivery.
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Old 12-03-23, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by john m flores
It's a fair point. It just seemed needlessly antagonistic in its delivery.
You expected something different?
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Old 12-04-23, 01:02 AM
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This video was quite literally the only thing that inspired me to start riding my bike more than around the block. I thought it looked neat, and it was in my backyard, so I went for it.


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Old 12-13-23, 10:01 PM
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Not sure it's a helpful guide, but my story:

I don't bike tour. It hasn't cracked the priorities with spouse, 3 kids, job, and limited vacation time. I live vicariously by dropping in on the forum.

I did one tour when I was 16, a three week 1000mile tour around Lake Michigan organized by a YMCA. It was guided but unsupported. We carried all our camping gear, stoves and fuel, and basically bought food once per day.

They sent out a 5-week training plan, going from 5-miles on alternate days to 25 miles every day, then welcome to the trip with loaded days of 45, 55, etc. Biggest scheduled day was 93ish miles.

I had camped, packed for backpacking, and camp cooked (&cleaned, the harder part) as a Boy Scout, so that aspect was smooth and fun. And the training was enough, there were harder days but I was never suffering.

Unfortunately, of the original 2 guides, five boys, and five girls, two of the girls hadn't trained enough (and perhaps had a very wrong idea what the trip entailed, language barrier?) and decide to quit and bus back to the YMCA site.

I dreamed of being a CIT or something on future trips, but the next summer I worked all summer. Then we moved, there was nothing (organized) that seemed similar.

And time got devoted to other interests.

Maybe when I retire!
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Old 12-13-23, 11:21 PM
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Originally Posted by JustaJoe
... others lack reading comprehension. Hint, re-read the 1st post.
Welcome to internet forums
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Old 12-14-23, 03:50 AM
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Originally Posted by tgot
Not sure it's a helpful guide, but my story:

I don't bike tour. It hasn't cracked the priorities with spouse, 3 kids, job, and limited vacation time. I live vicariously by dropping in on the forum.
...
Maybe when I retire!
My first tour was four days long before I retired. While working, I had difficulty taking more than one week off from the job. That said, I did a lot of camping, mostly canoe trips before retirement.

Second and all subsequent tours, done after I retired. So, keep dropping in on the forum so you are ready for retirement.
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Old 12-17-23, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by JustaJoe
If there was any recent threads on this, I am sorry I missed them.

I am curious how you got started touring. Not in terms of which bike, what equipment, etc. but rather:
  • Did you just decide to tour, pack up and leave one day?
  • Fully supported first tour?
  • Credit card tour?
  • Ease into by doing short trips?
  • Classes/experiences like ACA's Intro to Touring?
  • Jumped right into bikepacking?
  • Or a methodical approach of increasing fitness, accumulating gear, extensive planning?
  • Other?
I've been increasing my fitness so I can tour and have the bike I believe will be great for my needs. I don't have specialized touring/bikepacking equipment: A 5lb 2-person tent, Exped Synmat, MSR Whisperlite and some other stuff from car camping. I am thinking of doing a faux tour - well, a 2 day ride on the forest service roads of Croatan National Forest near coastal NC (flat!). I will drive there in my car, load up the bike, and ride 40-50mi, camp, then ride back to the car the next day. I want to make sure this is something I can do and want to do before going all-in (e.g. not spending $1k on gear before going on my 1st real tour, then finding out I hate it). Also planning some over-nighters from my house to the 2 state parks within reasonable riding distance.

My goal is to do some of the common routes in 2024 - GAP/C&O, maybe Ohio to Erie (I have family at both ends, huge help), etc. I'm still working for a paycheck, so time away is limited + my wife and I are planning a big vacation in 2024.

Let's hear your stories...
I had ridden a bike since a kid in the 1950s but did not do a tour until I was a fellow in pediatrics in Washington, DC in 1982. I rode from Georgetown up the C&O canal to Shepherdstown, WV to Front Royal, VA, up the Skyline Drive to camping at Big Meadows. Great trip except my head set blew just short of the end. A nice "old" couple (younger than I am now) stopped their Mercedes-Benz sedan and drove me the last 5 miles of the trip. The bike was NOT a touring bike but a Motobecane Grand Record road bike with gearing for much flatter rides. I stayed at a friend's house the first night and a hotel the second. I had camping equipment but did not use them until the camping spot. My wife drove our car up to meet me and the trip was definitely exhilarating! There were saddle bags but definitely NOT bikepacking.
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Old 12-17-23, 11:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
So, keep dropping in on the forum so you are ready for retirement.
Thanks!
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Old 12-18-23, 01:20 PM
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I finished a year of graduate work at Oregon State, and decided to ride my bike back home to New England. Threw away a massive amount of stuff, packed the rest in UPS and sent it home. Hopped on my bike June 1st and got to New England at foliage time early October, following the trans-Am trail with "Side trips" to Jasper Alberta, and North Carolina to pick up the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Was hooked, and did about 20 other tours, including a world tour, over the next few decades.
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