Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Shoes for Touring and Hiking

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Shoes for Touring and Hiking

Old 01-03-07, 10:11 PM
  #1  
More Energy than Sense
Thread Starter
 
aroundoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 718

Bikes: Co-Motion Divide

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Shoes for Touring and Hiking

Wenever I tour, I always like to take in as many day hikes as I can. As good as the scenery is from the road, it's usually better off the road and on the trail.

Curious if anyone else feels the same way and if you do, what kind of shoes do you bring? I toured Tasmania with some mid-high day hikers many years ago. They were great for hiking but were lousy for riding. Hard to get into toe clips, heavy (really heavy when wet), and not very stiff.

Other than packing a pair of hiking boots, do you have one shoe that does it all?
aroundoz is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 10:26 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
How far is your hike on average?

I've done the Japanese tourist thing and hiked a mile in and a mile out to an outlook on the Zion Canyon... in flipflops.

My hikes have never been hugely long. I've walked along Tasmania bush tracks in sports shoes and MTB shoes and Blundstone work boots. Heck, one day I even went bush in a suit and dress shoes on the West Coast (don't ask me why, but it worked out OK despite the rain that came).

The sports shoes were prone to getting my feet wet. The MTB shoes were very slippery on wet rocks. The Blundstone boots were OK and whilever I used toe clips and straps, they were OK on the bike, too. The sole was a bit too flexible. The significant problem with the boots for me is the width of the sole so it rubs on the crank and wears out straps.

Friends of mine have acquired proper walking boots to use also as their cycling shoes with clips and straps. The boots are good quality, and the thickness of the soles is good for pedal leverage.

I think if you want to combine hiking and biking, though, you really need to take along both, with preferably lighter weight in the hiking boots. If you use clipless pedals, there are always going to be issues with the cleat. And if you have a wet, muddy hike, at least you can change back into dry cycling shoes.
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 10:34 PM
  #3  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
I have Lake mtn bike shoes. When I toured Australia, they were basically all I wore ... for cycling AND for hiking. For example, I did the Cradle Mtn hike in Tasmania ... all with my Lakes. They are incredibly comfortable.

I also carry a pair of sandals for shorter walks and other occasions.


These are the ones I have:
https://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...untain%20Shoes
Machka is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 10:53 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Shemp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 857

Bikes: Cannondale T2000, Gary Fisher Sugar2, Trek Madone 5.2SL

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've got an older pair of Specialized rockhopper shoes that are pretty good at both, up to a point. Though a bit heavy, I also take a pair of Keen sandals for campground showers, creeks, evenings, longer hiking and off days. While heavier, they still provide some toe protection while hiking amongst roots and rocks while offering most benefits of a sandal.
Shemp is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 11:01 PM
  #5  
Slowpoach
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Melbourne, AU
Posts: 1,091

Bikes: Cannondale T800, Northwood tandem, 1970s Gitane fixxed 45x16

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm in a similar situation, I'm considering going clipless but would far prefer to use a single pair of shoes for both hiking and cycling. At the moment I am using stiff-soled sneakers with reasonable comfort. I haven't had to face really wet conditions with them, though.

You don't need boots for hiking in (unless you're planning extended trips in mud or snow/ice) (which, of course, can happen any time of year in Tassie or the Vic/NSW highlands). Having said that, I have a pair of (lightish) boots with a relatively shallow tread that also work fine for winter riding (although admittedly for medium-distance commuting, not tried on multi-day tours).

If you don't mind clips and straps, some lighter-weight walking/approach/trail running shoes are available with a reasonably stiff sole. One with a smoother tread would be a good compromise. I'll either be trying this next, or getting some MTB shoes and using them with clips & straps (or possibly Powergrips).

Machka - do the cleats cause problems, either with slipping on rocks, or getting damaged by them? Can you feel the cleats when you walk? Cradle Mountain is quite a good test, lots of rock scrambling on the way up.
Cave is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 11:10 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
PowerGrips certainly would make a decision on hiking boots for riding much simpler.
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 11:16 PM
  #7  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 329 Posts
Originally Posted by Cave
Machka - do the cleats cause problems, either with slipping on rocks, or getting damaged by them? Can you feel the cleats when you walk? Cradle Mountain is quite a good test, lots of rock scrambling on the way up.
No, the cleats don't cause significant problems - they are fairly well recessed, especially when the shoes were new. I don't feel them when I walk ... but I do hear them a bit. The shoes click a little when I walk.

As for slipping, if I stepped so that my cleat (the ball of my foot) landed directly onto a small rock, the shoe slipped a little, but I quickly learned to walk slowly ... either on my toes or on my heels, when I was walking across rocky bits.

As for wearing out the cleats, I change my cleats about once a year anyway.

I am actually more comfortable in my Lakes than I am in any other pair of shoes I own! Most of my other shoes end up giving me blisters or something when I hike in them, but not the Lakes.
Machka is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 11:28 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 8,546
Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Shimano Sandals. I've hiked up to 10 miles in them. I did some Tassie hiking in them too. I use Speedplay Frog pedals. The cleats are incompletely recessed, so hiking on slippery rock is a bit sketchy, but not too bad. If I was doing any real scrambling on rock, or carrying more than a light daypack, I would want light hiking shoes. They are perfectly fine for hiking on dirt/gravel surfaces.

They have been the only shoes I took on my last 3 tours.
valygrl is offline  
Old 01-03-07, 11:34 PM
  #9  
VWVagabonds.com
 
Losligato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 595
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
While on tour we like to run on the days we are not cycling. We have each brought along a pair of these Salomon Tech Amphibian shoes.

Running, hiking, water sports, and cycling. They are good all around shoes and are holding up well after three months on the road.

As an added bonus the heel folds down so they can be slipped on easily...great for getting shoes on while living in a tent.

Losligato is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 10:04 AM
  #10  
End of Hard Shoulder
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Manhattan
Posts: 55

Bikes: trek 520, 70's beater Ross

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I often see People on the Appalachian Trail with Gators. they seem light weight and comfy enough that I might bring those with my cycling shoes. Has anyone ever used these?
Visionquest is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 10:30 AM
  #11  
Lentement mais sûrement
 
Erick L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I had a different experience from Machka with cleated shoes. Ok for walking but I don't like them at all for "serious" hiking. Very slippery on rocks, too stiff, not enough ankle support. I like to run and hop from rock to rock where the only part that comes in contact is the cleat. Some Lake shoes look a bit better than my Specialized Rockhopper for ankle support but they still have the cleat.
Erick L is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 11:32 AM
  #12  
Professional Fuss-Budget
 
Bacciagalupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,494
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
At the risk of going against the prevailing winds....

Clipless shoes are the way to go IMO, the advantages are worth the learning curve. And a good cycling shoe will have stiff soles and freedom for your ankle to move, qualities that are not conducive to a good hiking shoe. A shoe that's a compromise will likely be too flexy for extensive cycling and too stiff for long hikes.

The solution may take a bit of experimentation -- cycling shoes + hiking sandals? Cycling sandals + hiking boots? Sandals all around? What works for one person may not for another -- e.g. I have problems walking long distances with sandals.

The health of your feet is very important for both of these activities, so you should use the correct tool for the job -- even though it means a little extra weight.

By the way, unless you're hiking in inclement weather, you should avoid heavy hiking shoes. The more weight you put on your feet, the more energy you're expending on your hike....
Bacciagalupe is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 11:47 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by Visionquest
I often see People on the Appalachian Trail with Gators. they seem light weight and comfy enough that I might bring those with my cycling shoes. Has anyone ever used these?
Gators are fine if you have boots that are ankle height or above. They would protect the laced area on cycling shoes but little else. Most cycling shoes use materials and construction for ventilation, too, so the purposes of gators to a degree are negated -- to keep boots drier, and less muddied. Gators come into their own for protecting the lower legs/trousers in scrubby country, and if there are snakes prevalent in the area. At least, in my experience.
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 12:17 PM
  #14  
End of Hard Shoulder
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Manhattan
Posts: 55

Bikes: trek 520, 70's beater Ross

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ooops. I meant Crocs. not Gators... I knew it was one of those pre-historic bitey Lizards.

anyone have experience with crocs???
Visionquest is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 07:12 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Madison Wi
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My situation is a bit different, but I'll chime in anyway. Last year I rode around New Zealand with 2 pairs of footwear, my Keen sandals that I did almost everything in and my hiking boots. I went on 2 5 day full backpacks, plus many more shorter day hikes, so full heavy hiking boots were warrented. I rode in my Keens with no problems. This year I'm biking around the Pacific Northwest and climbing a few mountains, but I found a pair of cycling shoes in the dumpster that I will try out as soon as I find a pair of pedals. The heavy hiking boots are coming as well, I couldn't imagine crampons on a cycling shoe .
kevink159 is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 07:26 PM
  #16  
You need a new bike
 
supcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 5,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
A good clipless MTB shoe is the way to go. Look for one with a flexible forefoot so it bends well at the ball of the foot. Also, you want a good rubber tread. Some MTB shoes have a hard tread material. Specialized has some shoes that fit the bill. I have a two-year old pair of Tahos that would be great for hiking.

I'm sure that other manufacturers have similar shoes that would work.
supcom is offline  
Old 01-04-07, 07:32 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My keen sandal experience is a lot different. I could not go longer than 3 miles without them killlllling me. I could wear them at work all day long, but get on the trail and it was a different story. I tried both with and without socks. 3 miles was it.
mtnbiktn is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 12:40 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
cosmo starr's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Dallas
Posts: 498
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Visionquest
ooops. I meant Crocs. not Gators... I knew it was one of those pre-historic bitey Lizards.

anyone have experience with crocs???
yeah, they dont offer enough protection....i knew someone who just this summer punctured the bottom of her foot when a sick poked through her crocs.

i also met a guy who hiked the entire Appalachian trail in Keens
cosmo starr is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 02:46 AM
  #19  
Left OZ now in Malaysia
 
jibi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lancashire England, but at the moment on an extended tour of South East Asia
Posts: 826

Bikes: Thorn Ravan Catlayst, Bill Nickson tourer, Bill Nickson Time Trial, Claud Butler Cape Wrath, Motobecame Tandem etc etc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
+1 for the Keen, I have the Newports

https://murl.se/18938

Brilliant! If used with Sealskinz socks waterproof too.

For hiking I prefer to have my ankle protected , so easy to slip and sprain an ankle on slippy rocks.
Shimano MT90 boots made with gortex and have a Vibram sole. The cleats are well recessed but, if I were to do a long hike, they can be quickly removed.

A set of Lake shoes I had fell apart in 3 months, the tread sole came away from the shoe and seams fell apart.

george
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
lakes.jpg (78.2 KB, 31 views)
jibi is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 11:25 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 464
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I tour with toe clips, so I can cycle in my runners, which are more pleasant for hiking. When I toured New Zealand, where I did a multi-day hike in the middle of the tour, I brought my hiking boots with me.
paul2 is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 07:53 PM
  #21  
More Energy than Sense
Thread Starter
 
aroundoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 718

Bikes: Co-Motion Divide

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for all of your responses. This was an easier decision to make prior to the advent of SPDs. I love touring w/ clipless pedals but don't like hiking in them especially when the going gets rocky=slippery.

I am really intrigued by the Keen Sandals as well as the idea of combining them w/ Sealskinz, Jibi. I imagine if it became cold the skinz, sock and bootie would keep a person's feet warm. Touring in warm weather with sandals make my feet very happy so that would be a great option. I might have to try a pair to see how good they are to hike in.

Cosmo Star, did the hiker do the AT trail in the Keen Newports?

The above Solomons also look good.

If I were going south of the equator again, it would be a no-brainer but probably going back to the Canadian Maritimes and last time I was there the temp varied between 10 and 32C.

You all gave me some great ideas to play with.
aroundoz is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 08:00 PM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by supcom
A good clipless MTB shoe is the way to go. Look for one with a flexible forefoot so it bends well at the ball of the foot. Also, you want a good rubber tread. Some MTB shoes have a hard tread material. Specialized has some shoes that fit the bill. I have a two-year old pair of Tahos that would be great for hiking.

I'm sure that other manufacturers have similar shoes that would work.
Yes, I like the Tahos, too. I do find, however, that irrespective of the MTB shoe with stiff soles, that the heel of the shoes wears quickly. I also wear quite quickly the outside ball-of-the-foot location on any shoe, and the Tahos were no different, which means (a) the cleat becomes exposed more quickly, and (b) the tread is less effective. Mind you, I used to do a lot of walking around town during lunchtimes and for meetings (I could wear them at work). Exposure of the cleat and walking on rocky surfaces soon produces very sore balls of the feet for me.

The greatest problem with Shimanos and the Tahos has always been slipperiness of the sole on wet rock (which is very common in Tasmania). Shimanos have been particularly bad in that regard, but otherwise good shoes. It surprises me a bit, because they are meant to be mountain bike shoes.

Last edited by Rowan; 01-05-07 at 08:41 PM.
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 08:34 PM
  #23  
More Energy than Sense
Thread Starter
 
aroundoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 718

Bikes: Co-Motion Divide

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rowan, I am not sure what Tahos are and I also meant to ask what are Crocs?

All this talk about Tasmania is bringing back some great memories. Did you or anyone do Maria Island or the Monument aka Totem Pole. I have done a fair amount of hiking but never have been so blown away by scenery than at these two places. Especially seeing the Totoem Pole and the cliffs. I would fly back just two do those hikes again.
aroundoz is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 08:40 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,771
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1454 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 40 Posts
I've been to Maria several times. Magic. But no the Totem Pole.

Even better was sailing around Maria (pronounced Mariah, as in Carey) on an ocean race... but that still doesn't beat the southern end of Bruny Island and sailing through Bob Hall's Parlour.

The Tahos are a mid-range MTB shoe that Specialized offers. I bought a pair because I had been having tremendous problems with hotfoot, and Specialized's insert with the inbuilt metatarsal button under the ball of the foot was what I wanted. The shoe fitted me width and length-wise (their higher range MTB shoes were too tight over the top), and I got some good mileage out of them... but not in the bush unless I was extremely careful with my footing.

Last edited by Rowan; 01-05-07 at 09:52 PM.
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-05-07, 09:28 PM
  #25  
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: oregon
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I wear $15 skate shoes from Big 5. They're thick so they don't tear chunks out of the bottom on the steel pedals, they're comfortable for hiking and everything else, and fairly light. The downside, they slip off the pedals easily in the rain and don't do real good on Mt. Whitney in november when it's icy.
creepingdeath is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.