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XTR hub?

Old 12-17-11, 05:21 AM
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XTR hub?

Any downside to an XTR hub compared to XT for a touring rear wheel?

I'll be needing a new rear wheel soon and am considering an XTR hub. I met a guy with them on his mountain bike, and was impressed that it was totally silent when coasting.

I realise it probably isn't "worth it", but as long as there is no disadvantage, so...

cheers!
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Old 12-17-11, 07:08 AM
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imi, I've actually found XTR and D-A hubs to be more noisy when coasting than Shimano's other groups. I don't know if there is any disadvantage to the XTR hub when used for touring, but there was some concern when the XT line began using aluminum axles.

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Old 12-17-11, 09:16 AM
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They are a good lightweight tough as nails hub that you can pound off-road. They aren't particularly delicate considering that they are made for demanding conditions. There are some of problems with them, however. First, finding a 36 hole XTR hub isn't impossible but it's not as common as a 32 hole hub. Second, if you buy new ones, you'll only find them in disc versions. If you need a disc hub that's good news but if you don't need discs, why pay for the privilege of using them?

Third, they aren't cheap. You could buy a good set of White Industry hubs that aren't disc compatible and run very, very, very smooth on seal cassette bearings for about the same price or you could buy a set of Phil Wood hubs that also run very smooth and can be taken apart with a 5 mm allen wrench for a bit more money. My rear Phil's cassette mechanism comes completely out of the body making spoke replacement on the drive side much easier and simpler.
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Old 12-17-11, 09:39 AM
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Thanks guys. Yeah i saw there are only disc XTR hubs now. Wasn't that many months ago I found the non-disc model...

I'm not sure if White or Woods hubs are easy to get in Europe? i buy most of my stuff online from England.
Ordering stuff, especially from the USA, from an LBS is usually extremely expensive here in Sweden.

One of my reasons for wanting to stick with Shimano was that in case of hub problems 'anywhere in the world', it would be easier to get a replacement hub and the old spokes would fit.

I'll probably go for XT again, but it is interesting to explore new possibilities

I've seen that some people have issues with XT's having aluminium axles, though I suspect this is more relevant if one is heavy, loaded very heavily... or jumping off things! n'est-ce pas?
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Old 12-17-11, 10:33 AM
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I have XTR 950 (older) hubs on my 26" touring bike and have been pretty happy with them. If you don't need disc capability, I'd try to find an older set in good (or NOS) condition and build them up.
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Old 12-17-11, 10:35 AM
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Me and the wife both have bikes with XTR hubs.

I got NOS from ebay, and bike shops. It didn't cost a lot.

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=....c0.m270.l1313

As far as appearance goes, I like the looks of the 950 best.
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Old 12-17-11, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by imi
Thanks guys. Yeah i saw there are only disc XTR hubs now. Wasn't that many months ago I found the non-disc model...

I'm not sure if White or Woods hubs are easy to get in Europe? i buy most of my stuff online from England.
Ordering stuff, especially from the USA, from an LBS is usually extremely expensive here in Sweden.

One of my reasons for wanting to stick with Shimano was that in case of hub problems 'anywhere in the world', it would be easier to get a replacement hub and the old spokes would fit.

I'll probably go for XT again, but it is interesting to explore new possibilities

I've seen that some people have issues with XT's having aluminium axles, though I suspect this is more relevant if one is heavy, loaded very heavily... or jumping off things! n'est-ce pas?
Phil Wood list several dealers in Sweden and many more in Europe. Might be worth looking into.

White Industries lists a dealer in Sweden including this website.
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Old 12-18-11, 02:28 AM
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It seems like it would be durable enough because it's a mtn bike hub and is meant to take a ton of abuse. And it goes without saying that shimano makes good quality stuff, so if you're into disc brakes I'd say go for it.
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Old 12-18-11, 03:22 AM
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Cheers Cyccommute! I could have done a bit more homework myself there!
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Old 12-18-11, 04:32 AM
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Older years they were steel axles, newer , to cut grams, the axle is Aluminum alloy..

No personal Experience,

though, there are simple designs including my Old bullseye Hubs
of making a really thick large diameter axle of aluminum, plenty strong.

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-18-11 at 04:37 AM.
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Old 12-18-11, 05:46 AM
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The issue with aluminium axles is not strength but the reduced space for bearings. The ball bearings are smaller than used on steel-axle hubs. There seem to be more freewheel failures, eg cracked shells. Have they reduced the shell thickness?
If you are looking for a premium touring hub and you have the money, then Phil Woods is the obvious choice. The spares support is a lot better than for Shimano in the long run.
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Old 12-18-11, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by imi
Cheers Cyccommute! I could have done a bit more homework myself there!
Just trying to do something about my nation's trade imbalance
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Old 12-18-11, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
Phil Wood list several dealers in Sweden and many more in Europe. Might be worth looking into.

White Industries lists a dealer in Sweden including this website.
can i ask what model of phil wood 9 speed hud would you recommend. i would like a good strong but light rear wheel so hub spokes and rim in 559 (600) i see sjs cycles in the uk sell phil wood hubs so i would like to get a price off them if i new what to ask for thanks.
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Old 12-18-11, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by antokelly
can i ask what model of phil wood 9 speed hud would you recommend. i would like a good strong but light rear wheel so hub spokes and rim in 559 (600) i see sjs cycles in the uk sell phil wood hubs so i would like to get a price off them if i new what to ask for thanks.
I'd probably go with the touring hubs. They are a little beefier than the road version. If you want 32 spoke or less, go with the road version.
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Old 12-18-11, 12:06 PM
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Dropping the need for a 9 speed cassette, I found Phil's freewheel Hubs great.

(I had a 48 hole so a broken spoke never stopped me,
in spite of not being able to replace it on the spot...
a bit of truing and I was good to go, on 47 remaining.)

7 speeds , but in a wide ratio spread, [+ triple crank]
have worked well for my long distance travels ..

Phil's freehubs , as I have read, Occasionally need a cleaning and re oiling,
when the function falters, but are made to be field stripped to do so..

just don't lose any small parts way out in the outback..
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Old 12-18-11, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
I'd probably go with the touring hubs. They are a little beefier than the road version. If you want 32 spoke or less, go with the road version.
thanks stuart what about those all emportant rims ,i would prefair 36 hole just to be on the safe side.
sorry imi dont mean to hijack your thread honest .
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Old 12-18-11, 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by antokelly
thanks stuart what about those all emportant rims ,i would prefair 36 hole just to be on the safe side.
sorry imi dont mean to hijack your thread honest .
I'd go with something that is off center drilled for the rear like a Velocity Synergy O/C (or even an Aerohead O/C) and the matching rim in the front. I'd build the wheel with DT Swiss Alpine III or Wheelsmith DH13. Both have a stronger head which makes for a stronger wheel.
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Old 12-19-11, 05:02 AM
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Them Phil Wood hubs sure look nice They come in lots of pretty colours as well!
Good to know sjs have them, thanks for the tip, anto
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Old 12-19-11, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
I'd go with something that is off center drilled for the rear like a Velocity Synergy O/C (or even an Aerohead O/C) and the matching rim in the front. I'd build the wheel with DT Swiss Alpine III or Wheelsmith DH13. Both have a stronger head which makes for a stronger wheel.
Stuart thanks a million for that your a true gent.sounds like a nice wheel i will ask sjs if they can supple and build that wheel for me in the new year.
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Old 12-19-11, 10:35 AM
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expensive hubs but i guess you get what you pay for and the amount of touring you do they will pay for themselfs in the long run.
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Old 12-19-11, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by antokelly
... i will ask sjs if they can supple and build that wheel for me in the new year.
Let us know if you go for a Velocity/Woods/Alpine III wheel or similar and how much it cost from sjs?
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Old 12-19-11, 11:45 AM
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re axle and spacers to suit, theres 10+mm of extra length on the left..
145, down to 135 ..
and Shimano's tandem hubs offer 40 spoke holes & 48.

my loaded touring bike, got a bit overbuilt for reliability and it worked.
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Old 12-19-11, 01:58 PM
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will do imi,
fietsbob my wheels are sun rhyno on xt hubs sapin stainless spokes, great wheels sjs built them for me but to be honest i want a much lighter wheel i just think there overkill for the touring i do .
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Old 12-19-11, 02:23 PM
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less spokes , just bring spares.. the cassettes come off, easier than freewheels,
with tools brought along.
freewheel , 6 speed , I could ride for a week on the 37 spokes Till I borrowed the big spanner.

DIY wheels, might be different at 1.50 per spoke, DB DT, and such,
than it was back when I got them at .35 each.

then a common 36 or 32 would be fine.. , screw up the wheel ,
you just buy a replacement.
no attachment to fancy stuff , works too..
just a different shopping philosophy.


If imi feels a desire to top shelf the parts , go for it.
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Old 12-19-11, 06:24 PM
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I have XT hubs that have worn out two touring bikes. After five years I decided to clean and re-grease the hubs. When I looked inside, everything, including the factory grease looked so new I just put the hub back together and rode another five years, rain or shine. I am still riding on those wheels but the rims braking surfaces are well canoed and will certainly fail soon. I already have a new set of wheels with new XT hubs ready to go.

So I guess if you can get XTR cheap somewhere, why not. But XT hubs will serve you well. If I had to spend a ton extra for XTR I might take a pass. It is my understanding that the "R" in XTR stands for "R&D". XT is top of the line, XTR is the next generation "beta" version of the component. I ride an XTR long cage rear derailleur. It looks really cool, and I picked it up cheap. I would have been just as happy with an XT no doubt.
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