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Build -up idea?

Old 08-11-13, 06:24 AM
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Build -up idea?

I am seriously considering building up 2 Long Haul Truckers for my wife and myself. Pretty much settled on the LHT Deluxe with the S&S couplings with 26" wheels.
So here is my idea. Buy a mountain bike from Bikes Direct and use the components and then sell the frame. The other option would be to purchase everything and do the build. Note-I work PT in a LBS and I get a good price on all purchases.
Thoughts?
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Old 08-11-13, 06:56 AM
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good thinking 99.
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Old 08-11-13, 07:02 AM
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Thought about doing just that a couple years ago. Priced it out for a Bikes Direct Windsor Tourist as a donor bike. Then I compared that to eBay possibilities - but put no price on the time that might be required to get the best prices for the same or similar quality components. Came out about even/a little less for the same quality non-frame parts. Otoh, if I was not willing to wait for particular components to be offered, a point in time set of eBay purchases supplemented with online store purchases to get components not available on eBay at that time if you will, it was about $100 more expensive after assuming I could sell the BD frame on eBay/Craigslist for $150, possibly quite a big assumption.

My conclusion was that it wasn't worth the time/effort for me as I wanted a bike "now" not "in two months". Seasonality of bike components on eBay definitely affects their availability and pricing.

I ended up buying a BD Windsor Tourist and was done with it. It's a decent bike; at least one member of this forum rode one across the US with his daughter and a friend of hers - I think all three were on BDWTs. The BDWT frame worked well for me until I hurt my back and switched to a recumbent.
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Old 08-11-13, 08:38 AM
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seems using the MTB 22,32, 44 crank, Bar end shifter drop bar mix is popular, and practical,
for touring specific builds.

I'm using Trekking bars , on my Trekking/Touring Bike... those are a no-brainer for running MTB Brifters.


though I use a Rohloff , so there the grip-shifter fits no larger bar diameter.. than 7/8"..

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-24-13 at 09:11 AM.
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Old 08-11-13, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Tandem Tom
I am seriously considering building up 2 Long Haul Truckers for my wife and myself. Pretty much settled on the LHT Deluxe with the S&S couplings with 26" wheels.
So here is my idea. Buy a mountain bike from Bikes Direct and use the components and then sell the frame. The other option would be to purchase everything and do the build. Note-I work PT in a LBS and I get a good price on all purchases.
Thoughts?
I went this route with a road bike. It didn't work out all that well. I paid around $500 for the Bikes Direct bike and ended up using only the wheels, shifters and derailers. That's a lot for those parts. Some of the issues I ran across were

-a carbon legged fork that was a boat anchor because of the steel steer tube. I've had old suspension forks that weighed less
-the external bottom bracket bearings were over tightened so much that I had to destroy the shell to remove it.
-the crank was incompatible with any other external bottom bracket so I had to get a different crank.
-the steer tube was too short for the bike I was going to use it on. That's not BD's fault but it did add to the cost.
-the seat post was the wrong size
-the handlebars were awful
-the stem was the wrong size
-I hadn't planned on using the saddle.
-the brakes were low end Tektros

All in all it didn't save me much money.

Something else to consider on the mountain bike components. If you are planning on using flat bars, the components will work but if you want to use a drop bar, the 10 speed Shimano components won't play with road shifters anymore.
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Old 08-11-13, 11:19 AM
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If there's a chance your part-time status can get you a complete LHT with some discount that would be the better route.
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Old 08-11-13, 04:15 PM
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Mountain bike components don't usually correspond one-to-one with what you want on a touring bike (e.g. handlebars, saddles, and tires). I'd look for "lightly used" LHTs, transfer the parts, and sell the LHT frames. Used LHT frames command premium prices on the used market (~$350), BikesDirect's frames do not.
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Old 08-11-13, 04:38 PM
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TT, How different of a configuration from OEM are you thinking of?

Brad
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Old 08-11-13, 06:12 PM
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I am going with trigger shifters, v-brakes, & trekking handle bars. I think after hearing some of the replies I will forgo BD and just do the builds. Also building my own wheels with the help of the other mechanic at the shop. I think this way I will get what I want.
Thanks for your replies!
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Old 08-11-13, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by bradtx
TT, How different of a configuration from OEM are you thinking of?

Brad
Interesting question. Nothing I look at ever seems to fit my tastes. Then again, if you knew the whole story of how I wanted to build a touring bike and ended up with enough parts to build two bikes, you'd think there's a circus inside my head.


Over the course of several years, I've changed my ideas on many things and from what I've heard many of the choices I've eliminated, people find acceptable for them. So, my comments about bike parts are just personal opinions.


frames: I chose aluminium because I saw pictures of steel frames that were rusted where the paint looked awful. Some people state even rusted steel can work well. I'd prefer not being forced to paint every once in a while.


brakes: After seeing a picture of someone's finger after working on disc brakes. I hesitate to buy disc brakes. However, I also read another comment from someone saying after not using his bike for a long while, the disc brakes seized. I prefer the simplicity of V-brakes. I'm excited that Shimano decided to make V-brakes for Sora, Tiagra and 105 although I don't see any road frames right now with cantis for V-brakes. I like the feel of Shimano Deore brake levers. And the Shimano Deore brakes are made in a way that's somewhat easier to service. I chose Jagwire brake pads although they're not tested yet. I plan to put Kool Stop dual compound (salmon/black) brake pads on my winter bike.


rigid/suspension forks: This is one area where I literaly couldn't make a decision. I bought a Nashbar touring frame with their rigid fork and also a WD Cycle Elite frame made for suspension forks. As for suspension forks, I suspect it may be easier to find replacement parts for Rockshox although I'd probably want to aim for any model higher than the XC28. I wouldn't go carbon because I read those can explode and injure you.


rims: I know usually people talk about the Sun Rhyno Lite and Velocity Dyad rims. I started thinking lately that maybe with all the hills in the area where I live, the rims may end being consumables like tires anyway. So in my case I may end up being satisfied paying less for Sun CR-18 rims.


hubs: Oh boy. Another one of those issues I can't get my head around. Many insist on Shimano Deore LX or even XT quality. Lately I started questioning the point of paying more for something you can service. I'm not saying Alivio or Sora hubs are ideal, just that they may be acceptable.


dynamo hubs: Just to mention for those who aren't familiar, the Shimano models that end with 20, 30, 35 apparently have more resistance. The models that end with 70, 71, 72, 80 etc. have less resistance.


dynamo lights: I haven't tried my Lumotec Lyt yet but I did read the Cyo apparently isn't that much brighter than the Fly. So, if I wanted more than the 25 lux model that I bought, I might go for the Fly.


spokes/nipples: I chose DT Swiss with brass nipples.


tires: The last contestants I was looking at (that I haven't even chosen yet) are: Schwalbe Marathon, Maxxis Overdrive, Michelin Tracker, Panaracer Crosstown, WTB All Terrain. I find the Maxxis Overdrive tempting though in 26x1.75 and 700x38.


tubes: maybe the Michelin Protek.


rim strip/tape: I'd prefer models you could take off, not tape but whatever.


Schrader/Presta valve: Not decided yet. If you really travel everywhere, it might be an idea to get 26 inch wheels with Schrader valves because of the supposed availability. Many insist Presta is superior.


freewheel/cassette: My big issue with freewheels is they usually only go down to 14T. Lately I saw Niagaracycle had a model that does go down to 11T but it takes a specialized tool to take it off. I prefer cassettes. Some people prefer SRAM cassettes for their Shimano setup.


number of speeds: 3 in the front and for me, 8 in the rear. If you want to use friction shifters so you don't have to go running to the shops to have your derailleurs adjusted, some people say 9 speeds is somewhat more challenging to use and 10 speeds not realistic. I like the wider chain anyway.


gearing: When riding down a slow hill against the wind, if I don't want to pedal furiously and sweat a lot to save time, I decided to build one bike with a 52/42/30 crankset with 11-32T cassette. This may be extreme and not ideal for touring. But, my mountain frame will get a 48/36/26 crankset.


square taper/external BB: Even though I chose square taper based on comments they were allegedly better sealed than external bottom brackets, I decided if I ever build another bike, it may well be an external BB. Why? Because I read you don't need specialized tools to remove/replace them.


cranks: I lean more towards Shimano or Sugino. If you buy a model like this: Shimano FC-M591 https://www.bike24.com/p211895.html in 48/36/26 with chainguard, you don't need to buy an SKS Chainboard to get a chainguard.


pedals: Ah, another one. Really. I don't know how many people want to convince you to go clipless or metal pedals. But, because I want the ability to put my foot down anytime, I prefer plastic platform pedals. Even though it may happen only once every five years, every time I hit myself with a metal pedal, I don't like it.


chain: Some people like KMC. Besides, I like the idea you can get them in silver.


stem: I bought a Zoom adjustable stem and realized later, I never really adjust the one on my hybrid anyway. So, my other bike is getting a fixed stem.


grips, headset spacers, seatpost, seatpost clamp: I got Sunlite and Origin8. Dimension looks like another acceptable brand.


saddle: I like the design of the WTB Freedom Relax model but haven't used it yet. I chose another slimmer WTB model for my touring frame but that one is not tested yet either.


shifters/derailleurs: One of my bikes is getting Falcon friction shifters and the other Ultegra 8 speed bar end shifters mounted on Paul Thumbies. The one with Falcon friction shifters will get an Alivio rear derailleur and Sora front derailleur. (Although I think Acera or even Altus derailleurs could have been acceptable with friction shifters.) The one with the Ultegra bar end shifters is getting a Shimano Deore LX low-normal rear derailleur and LX front derailleur. The Ultegra shifters can be used in index or friction mode. That's why I chose LX in case I want to put them in indexed mode (although only one side is index).


handlebars: Again, I got an Origin8 model but Brave Machine model for the mountain frame. That may have been excessive but the Brave Machine could possibly mount a light in the middle.


headset: I only chose Origin8 sealed bearing models but some go for FSA, Cane Creek.


If I didn't want suspension forks on my mountain frame though, I wish a manufacturer made a frame that takes non-suspension corrected forks. I also wish a manufacturer made a road bike frame made for flatbars and V-brakes. Or, even a frame like that made for 26 inch wheels. Heck, why not?


Whatever, I ended up rambling there. Sites I've looked at for finding parts...
niagaracycle, cambriabike, eBikestop, nashbar, velo orange, bikeparts, bikeman, wheelworld,
harriscyclery, jensonusa, universal cycles, eBay, amazon, chainreactioncycles, saint john cycles,
bike24, bikexperts, cyclepath.ca, smartbikeparts, cheapbikeparts360, bikepartsplace, price point,
blueskycycling, performance bike, bikeisland, benscycle, starbike, aebike, airbomb
xxcycle, whoolyhatshop

And to answer the above question more completely. Would anything OEM fit you? When I first thought about building a touring bike, I wanted a relaxed posture on a touring frame taking V-brakes with 52T to 11T max. gearing and rigid forks. I didn't want a touring bike with drop bars. But the more expensive hybrids I looked at often had suspension forks, disc brakes, gearing I didn't want and a forward leaning position. Plus, the models with dynamo hubs often choose ones with more resistance and BB-UN26 bottom bracket instead of the superior BB-UN55 bottom bracket. And which manufacturer sells a bicycle with Rockshox Recon Silver suspension forks with Falcon friction shifters? In the end I said I also wanted 48/36/26 but even that combination isn't always found on bikes. Nor are sometimes either chainguards or the SKS Chainboard. I still have to figure out how I'm going to put full coverage fenders on a bike with suspension forks. European Trekking bikes are interesting but not really sold in North America.

I'm also leaning more towards 26 inch wheels now since I'm 174cm tall or 5'8-1/2". Why doesn't anyone manufacturer a 26 inch wheel hybrid?

Last edited by hybridbkrdr; 08-11-13 at 07:30 PM.
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Old 08-11-13, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr
Interesting question. Nothing I look at ever seems to fit my tastes. Then again, if you knew the whole story of how I wanted to build a touring bike and ended up with enough parts to build two bikes, you'd think there's a circus inside my head.


Over the course of several years, I've changed my ideas on many things and from what I've heard many of the choices I've eliminated, people find acceptable for them. So, my comments about bike parts are just personal opinions.


frames: I chose aluminium because I saw pictures of steel frames that were rusted where the paint looked awful. Some people state even rusted steel can work well. I'd prefer not being forced to paint every once in a while.


brakes: After seeing a picture of someone's finger after working on disc brakes. I hesitate to buy disc brakes. However, I also read another comment from someone saying after not using his bike for a long while, the disc brakes seized. I prefer the simplicity of V-brakes. I'm excited that Shimano decided to make V-brakes for Sora, Tiagra and 105 although I don't see any road frames right now with cantis for V-brakes. I like the feel of Shimano Deore brake levers. And the Shimano Deore brakes are made in a way that's somewhat easier to service. I chose Jagwire brake pads although they're not tested yet. I plan to put Kool Stop dual compound (salmon/black) brake pads on my winter bike.


rigid/suspension forks: This is one area where I literaly couldn't make a decision. I bought a Nashbar touring frame with their rigid fork and also a WD Cycle Elite frame made for suspension forks. As for suspension forks, I suspect it may be easier to find replacement parts for Rockshox although I'd probably want to aim for any model higher than the XC28. I wouldn't go carbon because I read those can explode and injure you.


rims: I know usually people talk about the Sun Rhyno Lite and Velocity Dyad rims. I started thinking lately that maybe with all the hills in the area where I live, the rims may end being consumables like tires anyway. So in my case I may end up being satisfied paying less for Sun CR-18 rims.


hubs: Oh boy. Another one of those issues I can't get my head around. Many insist on Shimano Deore LX or even XT quality. Lately I started questioning the point of paying more for something you can service. I'm not saying Alivio or Sora hubs are ideal, just that they may be acceptable.


dynamo hubs: Just to mention for those who aren't familiar, the Shimano models that end with 20, 30, 35 apparently have more resistance. The models that end with 70, 71, 72, 80 etc. have less resistance.


dynamo lights: I haven't tried my Lumotec Lyt yet but I did read the Cyo apparently isn't that much brighter than the Fly. So, if I wanted more than the 25 lux model that I bought, I might go for the Fly.


spokes/nipples: I chose DT Swiss with brass nipples.


tires: The last contestants I was looking at (that I haven't even chosen yet) are: Schwalbe Marathon, Maxxis Overdrive, Michelin Tracker, Panaracer Crosstown, WTB All Terrain. I find the Maxxis Overdrive tempting though in 26x1.75 and 700x38.


tubes: maybe the Michelin Protek.


rim strip/tape: I'd prefer models you could take off, not tape but whatever.


Schrader/Presta valve: Not decided yet. If you really travel everywhere, it might be an idea to get 26 inch wheels with Schrader valves because of the supposed availability. Many insist Presta is superior.


freewheel/cassette: My big issue with freewheels is they usually only go down to 14T. Lately I saw Niagaracycle had a model that does go down to 11T but it takes a specialized tool to take it off. I prefer cassettes. Some people prefer SRAM cassettes for their Shimano setup.


number of speeds: 3 in the front and for me, 8 in the rear. If you want to use friction shifters so you don't have to go running to the shops to have your derailleurs adjusted, some people say 9 speeds is somewhat more challenging to use and 10 speeds not realistic. I like the wider chain anyway.


gearing: When riding down a slow hill against the wind, if I don't want to pedal furiously and sweat a lot to save time, I decided to build one bike with a 52/42/30 crankset with 11-32T cassette. This may be extreme and not ideal for touring. But, my mountain frame will get a 48/36/26 crankset.


square taper/external BB: Even though I chose square taper based on comments they were allegedly better sealed than external bottom brackets, I decided if I ever build another bike, it may well be an external BB. Why? Because I read you don't need specialized tools to remove/replace them.


cranks: I lean more towards Shimano or Sugino. If you buy a model like this: Shimano FC-M591 https://www.bike24.com/p211895.html in 48/36/26 with chainguard, you don't need to buy an SKS Chainboard to get a chainguard.


pedals: Ah, another one. Really. I don't know how many people want to convince you to go clipless or metal pedals. But, because I want the ability to put my foot down anytime, I prefer plastic platform pedals. Even though it may happen only once every five years, every time I hit myself with a metal pedal, I don't like it.


chain: Some people like KMC. Besides, I like the idea you can get them in silver.


stem: I bought a Zoom adjustable stem and realized later, I never really adjust the one on my hybrid anyway. So, my other bike is getting a fixed stem.


grips, headset spacers, seatpost, seatpost clamp: I got Sunlite and Origin8. Dimension looks like another acceptable brand.


saddle: I like the design of the WTB Freedom Relax model but haven't used it yet. I chose another slimmer WTB model for my touring frame but that one is not tested yet either.


shifters/derailleurs: One of my bikes is getting Falcon friction shifters and the other Ultegra 8 speed bar end shifters mounted on Paul Thumbies. The one with Falcon friction shifters will get an Alivio rear derailleur and Sora front derailleur. (Although I think Acera or even Altus derailleurs could have been acceptable with friction shifters.) The one with the Ultegra bar end shifters is getting a Shimano Deore LX low-normal rear derailleur and LX front derailleur. The Ultegra shifters can be used in index or friction mode. That's why I chose LX in case I want to put them in indexed mode (although only one side is index).


handlebars: Again, I got an Origin8 model but Brave Machine model for the mountain frame. That may have been excessive but the Brave Machine could possibly mount a light in the middle.


headset: I only chose Origin8 sealed bearing models but some go for FSA, Cane Creek.


If I didn't want suspension forks on my mountain frame though, I wish a manufacturer made a frame that takes non-suspension corrected forks. I also wish a manufacturer made a road bike frame made for flatbars and V-brakes. Or, even a frame like that made for 26 inch wheels. Heck, why not?


Whatever, I ended up rambling there. Sites I've looked at for finding parts...
niagaracycle, cambriabike, eBikestop, nashbar, velo orange, bikeparts, bikeman, wheelworld,
harriscyclery, jensonusa, universal cycles, eBay, amazon, chainreactioncycles, saint john cycles,
bike24, bikexperts, cyclepath.ca, smartbikeparts, cheapbikeparts360, bikepartsplace, price point,
blueskycycling, performance bike, bikeisland, benscycle, starbike, aebike, airbomb
xxcycle, whoolyhatshop

And to answer the above question more completely. Would anything OEM fit you? When I first thought about building a touring bike, I wanted a relaxed posture on a touring frame taking V-brakes with 52T to 11T max. gearing and rigid forks. I didn't want a touring bike with drop bars. But the more expensive hybrids I looked at often had suspension forks, disc brakes, gearing I didn't want and a forward leaning position. Plus, the models with dynamo hubs often choose ones with more resistance and BB-UN26 bottom bracket instead of the superior BB-UN55 bottom bracket. And which manufacturer sells a bicycle with Rockshox Recon Silver suspension forks with Falcon friction shifters? In the end I said I also wanted 48/36/26 but even that combination isn't always found on bikes. Nor are sometimes either chainguards or the SKS Chainboard. I still have to figure out how I'm going to put full coverage fenders on a bike with suspension forks. European Trekking bikes are interesting but not really sold in North America.

I'm also leaning more towards 26 inch wheels now since I'm 174cm tall or 5'8-1/2". Why doesn't anyone manufacturer a 26 inch wheel hybrid?
You're right - I think there's a circus going on inside your head. A 52T front sprocket and an upright riding position aren't something that are made for each other - less so on a loaded touring rig. I guess its safe to adsume neither of these bikes has actually been built.
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Old 08-11-13, 09:12 PM
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If you work at a shop, you pro deal the whole shebang from QBP. You won't get a better deal on new parts anywhere. Stop over thinking.
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Old 08-13-13, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Burton
You're right - I think there's a circus going on inside your head. A 52T front sprocket and an upright riding position aren't something that are made for each other - less so on a loaded touring rig. I guess its safe to adsume neither of these bikes has actually been built.
If I'm going down a long stretch of road against the wind, I'd prefer 52T to 11T to save time without breaking a sweat. Of course, those bikes aren't built yet. I still have a few more parts to go on the mountain bike. And the touring bike, well I decided to change my ideas on certain parts that I'm going to sell and replace with other parts.
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Old 08-13-13, 09:04 PM
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For the whirl of it, I decided to make up a budget list...


frame: Nashbar touring frame $108 (shows up in Canadian dollars for me)
https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...eader-NB__TDBA


fork: Nashbar touring fork $38
https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_511246_-1___


brakes: Shimano Deore (or Alivio but these Deore are on sale)
if choosing flat bars
rear $18
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...ake-black-rear
front $18
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...ke-black-front


brake levers: Shimano Deore left $16
if choosing flat bars
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...ver-1-5-finger
Shimano Deore right $16
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...ver-1-5-finger


crankset: Shiman Deore FC-M591 $90 U.S. (this has external BB which requires ordinary tools)
(48/36/26 gearing)
https://www.bike24.com/p211895.html


chain: KMC $15 (6, 7 or 8 speeds)
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...ed-each-silver


cassette: SRAM PG-830 $22 (8 speeds)
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...cassette-11-32


front derailleur: Shimano Acera $14.50 (compatible with 7/8 speeds) (or you could choose Alivio)
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...-ts-hdc-silver


rear derailleur: Shimano Acera $15.96 (compatible with 7/8 speeds) (or you could choose Alivio)
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...martcage-black


wheels: Sun CR-18 rims, Alivio hubs $120 (or you can choose Deore, Deore LX or XT)
(The advantage of this set is the Sun CR-18 rims are widely available and cheap if
you need to replace them.)
https://harriscyclery.net/product/shi...c-set-1678.htm
EDIT: I noticed it said this wheel is not ideal for touring. These wheels may be more ideal for day tripping without a lot of weight. In any case, I looked quickly for wheels with Rhyno Lite rims. This may take a slightly wider tire and are 32 hole. But, it's what I found when I looked quickly:
rear wheel Rhyno Lite rim/Deore hub
https://www.performancebike.com/bikes...400933__400933
front wheel Rhyno Lite rim/Deore hub
https://www.performancebike.com/bikes...400933__400933

shifters: Falcon friction shifters $12 (5 to 8 speeds)
if choosing flat bars
https://www.bikeman.com/LD1102.html


So you have a lot of the parts to build a bike for about $503.
The reason why I chose Acera derailleurs is because with friction shifters, I wouldn't see the need to go
higher than Alivio.
The Nashbar frame comes with derailleur hanger and cable guide but no cable stops.
cable stops $11
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categori...k-shift-bosses
Shifters come with cables, brake levers come with cables and brakes come with brake pads (usually).
I would also choose rim strips for the wheels (of course).
Then you need headset, headset spacers, seatpost, seatpost clamp, saddle, pedals, grips, handlebars tires and tubes.
I also prefer to choose a chainstay protector, spoke protector, frame and wheel reflectors.
(Then racks, panniers, bottle cages, kickstand, fenders, lights and bell.)

Although I'd prefer 26 inch wheels, this frame was made for rigid forks and one is available for it in the same color.

Last edited by hybridbkrdr; 08-24-13 at 08:52 AM.
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Old 08-13-13, 09:36 PM
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hybridbkrdr, I have that wheel set on my T bike. With a little TLC they're outstanding performers. I try not to 'budget' a build before or after.

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Old 08-14-13, 08:34 PM
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Originally Posted by bradtx
hybridbkrdr, I have that wheel set on my T bike. With a little TLC they're outstanding performers. I try not to 'budget' a build before or after.

Brad
After posting that, I found some messages from people saying sometimes the supplier sends 32 hole wheels instead of 36. Can you say if you received the 36 hole or 32 hole model?
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Old 08-15-13, 03:58 AM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr
After posting that, I found some messages from people saying sometimes the supplier sends 32 hole wheels instead of 36. Can you say if you received the 36 hole or 32 hole model?
Mine are 36H.

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Old 08-23-13, 08:49 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by bradtx
hybridbkrdr, I have that wheel set on my T bike. With a little TLC they're outstanding performers. I try not to 'budget' a build before or after.

Brad
Do you mean truing the wheels or re-greasing them?
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Old 08-23-13, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr
Do you mean truing the wheels or re-greasing them?
Just stressing and re truing. They are machine built to meet a price point and surprisingly they arrived nicely tensioned. The front was almost dead-on while the rear needed a little retensioning followed with truing. The hubs were like every new Shimano hub I've bought, a little tight at first and then after a 100 miles or so just fine. I haven't touched them.

My T bike was built using my spare roadie parts and this budget wheel set because I wasn't sure whether I'd like touring/day tripping. If not I'd sell, if I did I'd upgrade. I like day tripping and I don't see any real advantage to upgrading the wheels after almost three years, during which they've not required any adjustment that I remember.

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Old 08-23-13, 12:51 PM
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Ah, thanks, good to know. I was considering Sun CR-18 and Rhyno Lite rims lately because I saw them on sites in the U.S. and Europe and they're inexpensive. I had an experience once where I let myself go down real fast down a hill and braked for like 150 feet. I had put a cheap brake in the rear thinking it might work better. But, it appeared the brake pads were like sand paper. So, at the end of the hill, the brake pads literally went through the rear rim. I now view rims as being more "replaceable" than I did before.
(For those wondering, there's a tire chart on sheldonbrown. It looks like the CR-18 is more compatible with 28 mm tires like the Vittoria Randonneur.)
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Old 08-23-13, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Tandem Tom
I am seriously considering building up 2 Long Haul Truckers for my wife and myself. Pretty much settled on the LHT Deluxe with the S&S couplings with 26" wheels.
So here is my idea. Buy a mountain bike from Bikes Direct and use the components and then sell the frame. The other option would be to purchase everything and do the build. Note-I work PT in a LBS and I get a good price on all purchases.
Thoughts?
Hi Tom,

The idea of buying a doner bike can work out. I've done it twice and I'd research it the next time I build-up a bike.

Consider this Nashbar touring bike as a doner bike over a Bikes direct MTB: https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_553824_-1___

Nashbar has a 20% sale a few times a year. Today is the last day: Take an Extra 20 Percent Off Your Entire Order of $50+. Discount will be taken in cart. Use Code: 82494. Discount does not apply to shipping, handling or taxes. *Includes Frames & Bikes. Offer valid 8/22/13 - 8/23/13 Only.

it includes;

FRAME: CrMo 4130 T/T & D/T D.B. (AHJ1280A) Weld No Lug ST29.8mm FOR POST 27.2mm
FORK: Hi Tensile Steel 1" Steerer
HEADSET: NECO H-807W 1" CROWN RACE 27 BK W/O LOGO
CRANKSET: FSA CK-4001SST Omega Triple Casted / MegaExo / N-10 / 50-39-30
BOTTOM BRACKET: FSA
SHIFTERS: Shimano Tiagra 3 x 10
LEVERS: Shimano Tiagra
HANDLEBAR: Kalloy Uno
STEM: Kalloy Uno Alloy Quill
FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano Tiagra
REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano Deore
CASSETTE: SRAM CS PG-1050 11-32
BRAKES: Tektro Alloy
WHEELSET: ALEX DC-19 Alloy 700c
TIRES: KENDA K-197 700x32C
PEDALS: Wellgo LU-908 Silver body & cage
SEATPOST: Kalloy Uno SP-602 27.2x300
SADDLE: Velo VL-2036A
CHAIN: KMC X10
GRIPS/TAPE: Velo
RACK MOUNTS: yes

This bike has 700c wheels which should be easy to sell on eBay or Craigslist or can be use on some other bike. You would still need a set of 26inch wheels. You would need a new saddle, stem and possibly handlebars but these should be selected to fit you in any case.

The Shimano 105 triple shifters and the Tiagra front and Deore rear derailleurs with a ten speed 11-32 cassette is a good match to the 26inch wheels and is a big upgrade over standard LHT equipment.
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Old 08-23-13, 05:13 PM
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My "stuff" arrived today at the LBS where I work PT. I have everything ecept my wife's frame which will come UPS next week. Will be ordering fenders and tires and a few other bits next week.
Today I installed the headset,Cane Creek, and the crank Deore M590 22-32-44.
Brought the wheels home to lace up and then will true them at the shop.
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Old 08-24-13, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr
... ...
gearing: When riding down a slow hill against the wind, if I don't want to pedal furiously and sweat a lot to save time, I decided to build one bike with a 52/42/30 crankset with 11-32T cassette. This may be extreme and not ideal for touring. But, my mountain frame will get a 48/36/26 crankset.
... ...
Originally Posted by Burton
You're right - I think there's a circus going on inside your head. A 52T front sprocket and an upright riding position aren't something that are made for each other - less so on a loaded touring rig. I guess its safe to adsume neither of these bikes has actually been built.
Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr
If I'm going down a long stretch of road against the wind, I'd prefer 52T to 11T to save time without breaking a sweat. Of course, those bikes aren't built yet. I still have a few more parts to go on the mountain bike. And the touring bike, well I decided to change my ideas on certain parts that I'm going to sell and replace with other parts.
On one tour about four years ago on the last day I think I was in my 52 front/11 rear gear for about 20 miles. It was steady downhill grade, about 1 to 1.5 percent on gravel, George S Mickelson trail to the southern end. I really loved having the 52 front for that. Every few miles I stopped and waited for my touring partner to catch up, he had mountain gearing.

And last summer going down some of the hills around Glacier NP that were shallow enough that I could not coast, it was great then too.

And, this past spring about 18 or 20 miles downhill from the eastern continental divide on the GAP trail, that 52/11 gear again was great to have.

I spend very little time in the 52/11 or 52/12 gears, but I love having them and use them on every trip. I only use them downhill, but why not have a couple gears that you only use occasionally? On a pure distance measured basis, I probably have as many miles on those two highest gears as I have in my lowest two gears.

But, you might consider a smaller granny than 30t. I am running a 52/42/24 front, the 24 is aftermarket. Rear, I have a Sram 11/32 eight speed, 11/12/14/16/18/21/26/32. The upshift from the 24 to 42 is not very smooth, but I can almost always complete the shift in a distance of about 30 feet. I am sure that a 30t would shift better but there are times that I really needed that 24t and a 30t would have been too tough on my knees.




You might be happier with an indexed rear shifter, I am.

Having a chain catcher is also a good idea. Cheap at Niagara.
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Old 08-24-13, 08:54 AM
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Yeah, I decided the other day I plan on using 48/36/26 on my other bike as well. Enough of me hijacking this thread though. I'd like to see the build up pics.
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