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What size track frame will fit me?

Old 01-15-21, 10:21 PM
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jrockey2
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What size track frame will fit me?

Hello All,
I am looking to purchase my first track bike and I was wondering if I could get some advise on what frame size would be best. I am currently looking at a 55cm square NJS frame. I am 182cm tall (roughly 6 feet), with an inseam of 84cm. I also will be using a 100-110 mm stem. I intend to use this bike mainly on the roads, but I also want to use it on the track. I am looking forward to hearing your thoughts on what size will be perfect for me.
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Old 01-16-21, 12:46 AM
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Baby Puke
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That 55 is gonna be far too small for you. A human of your height would probably be looking for a top tube between 57-61 cm, depending upon your other dimensions.
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Old 01-16-21, 12:54 AM
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Clythio
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1,83m heavy chassis 90kg, tried 56 frames when got back to track cycling in 2017 (even tried 54 frames, on the old trend of short, fast-reaction bikes), but for sprint activities, with currently the used higher hands position and smaller width handlebars, I've later switched to 58 XL (Fuji Track Elite) and won't look back in terms of control, power transfer etc. And I'm with a 130mm stem.
So, if you intend to spend some time on real tracks, go for something at least 56 or above.
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Old 01-16-21, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by jrockey2 View Post
Hello All,
I am looking to purchase my first track bike and I was wondering if I could get some advise on what frame size would be best. I am currently looking at a 55cm square NJS frame. I am 182cm tall (roughly 6 feet), with an inseam of 84cm. I also will be using a 100-110 mm stem. I intend to use this bike mainly on the roads, but I also want to use it on the track. I am looking forward to hearing your thoughts on what size will be perfect for me.
I am 178cm with 82cm inseam and ride a 55 top tube frame with a 120mm stem and my bars have an 80mm reach I use the frame for endurance mass start and pursuit so itís a bit of a compromise and Iím considering trying a 130mm stem.
my guess is that the frame you are looking at would be on the small side unless you have arms like a T-Rex?
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Old 01-16-21, 04:57 PM
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2500W
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French sprinters such as Gregory Bauge (181cm) and Quentin Lafargue (183cm), generally do well on frames of size M. The older model L96 had a reach/stack 405mm/559mm. Current frames Look R96 & T20 of size M have reach/stack 427mm/520mm. Only Quentin Caleyron (188cm) was seen mounted on Look's largest frame.

Here is Lafargue on L96 (the referent measures are the wheel diameter, an average of 676mm; and the closest possible front-centre of 583mm):


Last edited by 2500W; 01-22-21 at 07:43 AM. Reason: Look L96, not R564
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Old 01-17-21, 04:55 AM
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Originally Posted by 2500W View Post
French sprinters such as Arnaud Tournant, Gregory Bauge and Quentin Lafargue, all in the range 180-183cm, generally do well on frames of size M, reach 424mm (Look R564) or 427mm (Look R96/&20). Only Quentin Caleyron (188cm) was seen mounted on Look's largest frame.

Here is Lafargue on R564 (the referent measures are the wheel diameter, an average of 676mm; and the closest possible front-centre of 586mm):

Giddeon Massie also rode a LOOK 496 in his prime:



...it was still too small for him. I think he made it work because he seems to have longer legs and a shorter torso instead of a 50/50 build. So, he just jacked up the seat post and moved his saddle back to make space for his legs.

When he returned to track cycling a couple of years ago, he was on a 60cm Felt TK-FRD that fit him a lot better. I know because I spotted the size sticker on his frame from one of his social media posts.

Part of the problem with top riders riding small frames is that that's what bike manufacturers made. When the British made their own frames, Hoy (6' 1"/185cm) rode maybe a 60cm top tube (give or take):



I imagine that this proved to be more aerodynamic with the arms acting as a ramp for the air.

Last edited by carleton; 01-17-21 at 05:01 AM.
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Old 01-17-21, 04:59 AM
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Also, when Hoy started his bike company, his top entry/mid level "Fiorenzuola" frame came in size 60 or 61. Soon after, Felt offered the TK-FRD in 60cm.

I think manufacturers caught on.
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Old 01-17-21, 05:13 AM
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Here's one of Hoy's early UKSI bikes.



Look at the reach on those bars...trying to stretch out to get the body in the correct position.
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Old 01-17-21, 08:07 AM
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Lutz Hesslich, his son and his winning Textima of 1980s. He once rode a match sprint in 9.98 s. Some interesting geometry numbers I extracted include a 439mm reach at a 554mm stack and a 608 mm front-centre, i.e. pretty longer than traditional Italian-Japanese geometry. Now, Lutz only expressed regret for "completely nonsensical gears, with a cadence of up to 170rpm" they use in 80s (an article in German >>).

I am very impressed by new track geometry consistently presented by Look, Koga, BT, and Argon 18, especially in their elite models. I was eager to buy an aluminium frameset that resembles this geometry such as Fuji Elite (cons., complete bike only), Thunderdome (complete, currently not available in Europe), or Jorbi Omnium Al (they did not respond, now doubled the price, and no info on loading it with a 117-kg rider).

However, Hesslich was in his prime until the age of 28; and Hoy -- until 36. I am 56-57 yo enthusiast and probably most of us in this forum are well over 36 yo. I started to ride regularly in mid 2017. Last year I injured my lower back after adding 92mm handlebar reach plus 140mm quill-stem to the 411mm frame reach. So IMO old guys should stretch their bikes and themselves very carefully. And please do not spurt against the wind and handle the drops simultaneously.

Last edited by 2500W; 01-22-21 at 07:32 AM. Reason: Textima, not Texima
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Old 01-17-21, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by 2500W View Post
. please do not spurt against the wind and handle the drops simultaneously.

definitely do not want to be spurting against the wind!
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Old 01-17-21, 01:23 PM
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carleton
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Originally Posted by 2500W View Post


Lutz Hesslich, his son and his winning Texima of 1980s. He once rode a match sprint in 9.98 s. Some interesting geometry numbers I extracted include a 439mm reach at a 554mm stack and a 608 mm front-centre, i.e. pretty longer than traditional Italian-Japanese geometry. Now, Lutz only expressed regret for "completely nonsensical gears, with a cadence of up to 170rpm" they use in 80s (an article in German >>).

...

However, Hesslich was in his prime until the age of 28; and Hoy -- until 36. I am 56-57 yo enthusiast and probably most of us in this forum are well over 36 yo...
As we age, the cadences that we can maintain drop off significantly...but our strength doesn't fall at the same rate. Bigger gears (along with other factors like training regimes) may explain why pro trackies can stay on top of the sport well into their 30s.
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Old 01-17-21, 06:04 PM
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Gears and cadence cannot predict the career span of a sprinter. Hesslich taken his first medal of Worlds at age of 18; and his last at age of 28. His closest teammate -- Huebner -- was just of a different breed. He reached the world podium first at age of 24 and last at age of 37. Huebner probably used similar gears (I estimated 50/14 in a certain event).
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Old 09-15-21, 05:19 PM
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FWIW, I was (am) a roadie with reasonable flexibility transitioning to the track and I was advised to size up through these forums. I generally ride a 56cm TT on the road with a 120mm stem (I am 183cm in height), but my track rig has a 58cm TT with a 130mm stem (and am considering 140) and fits well. There are times when I wish I had a little bit more reach. The point is...abandon the conventions of "road" sizing and perhaps go 2cm longer if using TT as a reference point. This is a very simplistic approach, but it helped me in the road to track bike fit process. See shameless bike photo op below:


Last edited by brian44; 09-15-21 at 05:26 PM.
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