Notices
Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

High HR?

Old 03-14-20, 06:18 PM
  #1  
Reynolds 
Passista
Thread Starter
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,248

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaña pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 737 Post(s)
Liked 401 Times in 225 Posts
High HR?

Today I took my old HRM from the drawer and put it on again after 3 years. Partly to disconnect a bit from the coronavirus information overload, I decided to resume organized training. Got some numbers I'd like to know your opinion about.
First I wanted to do a MHR test:
10 mins warm up from 100 to 140
5 mins ramping it up from 140 to 172
All-out 20 sec sprint on a slight uphill, 188 max
149 after 1 min of rest
128 after 2 mins
After about 20 mins easy spinning at 120-125 I tried a workout I used to do:
10 mins at 170 (90%)
5 mins recovery at 120
Repeat 3 times
Cool down from 170 to 100-105.
On the first interval, it was a bit hard to go over 165 at first, but on a slight hill I reached 176 and didn't have a problem keeping it over 170 until the end.
On the second, I pushed it a little to 173-176 and felt a bit of discomfort at the end (slight right side pain).
On the third, I kept it at 170-172 and had no problems maintaing it for the whole 10 mins.
Recovery: from 170 to 128 after 1 min, to 115 after 2 mins. I was a bit tired but not exhausted at all.
Now these numbers look high as I'm nearly 69 years old, but always had higher than normal MHR (max recorded 192 at 55) and my Dr. said it's a personal thing, not better or worse than standard.
By the way, my RHR is about 52, min ever recorded 48.
Reynolds is offline  
Old 03-14-20, 08:20 PM
  #2  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 8,234

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91, '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3245 Post(s)
Liked 1,834 Times in 1,302 Posts
All our HR devices tell you is beats per minute. It'd be dangerous to tell you anything medical from that. I think most that led an active life with a fair amount of cardio elevated work or exercise have a higher Max HR than what is touted for more easy going life style. I have to run at near anaerobic levels to keep up with everyone else on an average group ride. My heart doctor says that's okay. If you don't have one, get one. My G.P. and other doctors are always wishy washy when I talk HR and cycling issue with them.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 03-15-20, 03:29 AM
  #3  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,990

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 191 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4258 Post(s)
Liked 2,211 Times in 1,429 Posts
Heart rate can vary with physical condition, health/illness, prescription and OTC medications, caffeine, alcohol, many factors.

At age 62 mine is all over the place. My resting and maximum HR runs higher when I take meds for allergies and asthma, lower on other days.

So I tend to look for trends over time, rather than pay much attention to any single workout or even an entire week's rides and workouts.

The last test I did to check my maximum heart rate was summer 2019 when I got a Wahoo Tickr. At the time I could consistently hit 170-173 bpm in tests I repeated over the summer. The last time I hit 171 was on a maximum effort 0.4 mile steep climb, back around October. I doubt I could hit 170 now. I'll repeat a max HR test later this year, after the current COVID-19 pandemic scare is over. My most recent blood work showed elevated monocytes (I had a long term autoimmune disorder with chronic inflammation), so for now I'm avoiding HIIT and max effort workouts.

Some rides, during the first 30 minutes, my HR hits 130 bpm just coasting down the slight hill from my parking lot and pegs around 160-170 bpm on the first hill. After an hour it settles down and stays around 130 for consistent moderate efforts and hits 160+ only on maximum efforts.

But this past week I couldn't get my heart rate above 140 bpm, even on efforts that usually bump it to 160+. My usual resting pulse is around 65, but it's been as low as 58 the past few days, and my BP was as low as 104/48 (I usually run around 120/60). Probably due to a muscle relaxer I take for neck and shoulder spasms from injuries. But it seemed to persist more than 24 hours. I don't take that med often, less than once a month, so maybe that's just how long it takes to clear my system.

And my endocrinologist just increased my thyroid meds, so I'll probably see some increase in BP and HR when it takes effect. Then it'll probably settle down again after a few weeks.

Another factor for me is riding style. For years I was a spinner, around 90 rpm, even before it was fashionable. Just felt natural. But last year I noticed my heart rate pegged way too early on climbs and I'd gas out suddenly. After getting the Tickr I had enough data to confirm that impression.

I went back to 1990s articles and re-read everything I could find about the reasons for the transition from the old days of slow mashing efforts (it wasn't unusual for pros through the Merckx era to grind as slowly as the mid-40s to low 50s on long climbs). The faster spinning style, practiced by many but mostly attributed to Lance Armstrong under Dr. Ferrari's tutelage, was intended to reduce wear and tear on the legs, which recovered slower than aerobic efforts. A top athlete, trained and accustomed to spinning, would still be in pain from a burning chest, but could recover overnight from that. But cooked legs could take a day or longer to recover. (And, of course, EPO and blood doping helped with the transition to the heavier aerobic demands of spinning.)

Basically, it made no sense for me to emulate a 100-110 rpm spinning style. I'm not racing up to 200 miles a day for three weeks at a time with only a couple of days rest. I'm riding 3-5 times a week, 20-50 miles per ride.

So around August 2019 I deliberately changed pedaling style in favor of a slower cadence and harder gears. Coincidentally I was also riding a new-to-me 1993 Trek 5900 that had been fitted with old school Biopace 52/42 eccentric chainrings. Reportedly those worked better for some cyclists at 80 rpm or slower.

It took a couple of weeks to actually get comfortable with mashing harder gears -- I didn't realize how lazy and poorly toned my legs were. But pretty soon I was comfortable at 60-75 rpm. And, sure enough, my heart rate dropped overall on the same routes, same speed, same perceived efforts (allowing for wind conditions, etc.). I got stronger and faster for the same effort.

So I'm still mostly mashing, although occasionally I'll switch to my normal 90 rpm (it still feels natural to me) just for a change of pace, and to relieve any slight aching in my legs and knees during a ride. Around 5 minutes at a faster cadence in an easier gear is usually enough to recover and go back to slower mashing. And I can see the change in heart rate corresponding with my cadence change.

But that's just me. Dunno if that variation in cadence and gearing would make much difference in heart rate and overall performance for other folks. It'd be interesting to hear from other cyclists who've tried a methodical change in cadence.
canklecat is offline  
Likes For canklecat:
Old 03-19-20, 04:04 PM
  #4  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,642

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3014 Post(s)
Liked 932 Times in 706 Posts
From your information I can tell that you have no idea what your MHR is, which is normal. Don't worry or even think about it. Instead, find your lactate threshold HR. Here's the easiest protocol for that I know of: https://trainright.com/cts-field-tes...-calculations/

Another way to find LTHR is to warm up well, then climb a long hill, gradually increasing intensity until it's impossible to breathe deeply, one is forced to pant. Note that HR. Gradually ease off and note the HR at which you cease panting. Increase again and check that panting HR again. Your LTHR will be just a few beats below that panting point, maybe 2-3. Judge all your zones off LTHR, not MHR, which you can't reliably find anyway.

As above, your numbers are your numbers, nothing to do with anyone else's numbers.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 03-19-20, 09:12 PM
  #5  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,642

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3014 Post(s)
Liked 932 Times in 706 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
All our HR devices tell you is beats per minute. It'd be dangerous to tell you anything medical from that. I think most that led an active life with a fair amount of cardio elevated work or exercise have a higher Max HR than what is touted for more easy going life style. I have to run at near anaerobic levels to keep up with everyone else on an average group ride. My heart doctor says that's okay. If you don't have one, get one. My G.P. and other doctors are always wishy washy when I talk HR and cycling issue with them.
Me too, always going harder than they are. OTOH, one gets into exceptionally good condition for who one is. I actually aged out of even that ability a few years ago and started riding tandem with my wife to take the pressure off. Now, whenever I go out with the fast boys on my single, I can keep up again. Tandeming in hilly country with your wife can be really good exercise.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.