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Peanut butter and saturated fats

Old 03-13-24, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
I believe that not all cyclists get enough protein in their diet.

We active cyclists need more protein than the RDA, not more than the "average American".

Whether the "average American" gets more or less than the RDA is not important. I am not "average"; nobody is "average". I have to be mindful to get enough protein (and total calories) daily. Except for yogurt (quality source of protein and calcium), I eat vegan. I am not unique.
For the most part I'm just pointing out that what you quoted in your previous post isn't any great amount of protein.

The recommended protein requirement for a recreational cyclist is still 1.2-1.4 g/kg/day, the same as any other endurance athlete.
And even if you go back to your post #7 where you listed a max recommendation of 2 g/kg/day, it's still likely less than the amount of protein that many eat today that don't even do any exercise whatsoever. Although IIRC, 2 g/kg/day is or was the recommended amount for endurance athletes. So if you are recommending more than that, then how much more?

I'm also not sure why you find it hard to meet the daily requirement as a vegetarian. Quite a few nutritious vegetables, beans, peas and such have protein. But one pitfall I read when I went ovo-pescatarian is that some people rely to heavy on pasta and other nutritionally barren choices to use as filler.

Last edited by Iride01; 03-13-24 at 12:31 PM.
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Old 03-17-24, 12:15 PM
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OP... "Food for thought" regarding peanuts and peanut butter... Consider buying organic:
https://www.livestrong.com/article/2...o-buy-organic/
4. Peanuts
Peanuts are actually not a nut, but a member of the legume family, which also includes peas, beans and lentils. Unlike tree nuts, peanuts are grown underground, according to the National Peanut Board. This makes them especially susceptible to mold and fungi from moist soil, as well as increased exposure to pesticides that get absorbed into the soil.
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Old 04-17-24, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
Originally Posted by terrymorse
I believe that not all cyclists get enough protein in their diet.

We active cyclists need more protein than the RDA, not more than the "average American".

Whether the "average American" gets more or less than the RDA is not important. I am not "average"; nobody is "average". I have to be mindful to get enough protein (and total calories) daily. Except for yogurt (quality source of protein and calcium), I eat vegan. I am not unique.
For the most part I'm just pointing out that what you quoted in your previous post isn't any great amount of protein.

​​​​​​​The recommended protein requirement for a recreational cyclist is still 1.2-1.4 g/kg/day, the same as any other endurance athlete.
And even if you go back to your post #7 where you listed a max recommendation of 2 g/kg/day, it's still likely less than the amount of protein that many eat today that don't even do any exercise whatsoever. Although IIRC, 2 g/kg/day is or was the recommended amount for endurance athletes. So if you are recommending more than that, then how much more?

I'm also not sure why you find it hard to meet the daily requirement as a vegetarian. Quite a few nutritious vegetables, beans, peas and such have protein. But one pitfall I read when I went ovo-pescatarian is that some people rely to heavy on pasta and other nutritionally barren choices to use as filler.
I might have to recant on this.

I haven't tracked my food in quite a while, but since posting this I've been tracking my meals and food some. And it seems I might not be getting enough protein as I thought I was.
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Old 04-17-24, 02:14 PM
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I eat peanut butter and eggs sandwiched between two pieces of juicy steak.

Like anything...Moderation. And genetics plays a role as well.
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Old 04-18-24, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
I believe that not all cyclists get enough protein in their diet.

We active cyclists need more protein than the RDA, not more than the "average American".

Whether the "average American" gets more or less than the RDA is not important. I am not "average"; nobody is "average". I have to be mindful to get enough protein (and total calories) daily. Except for yogurt (quality source of protein and calcium), I eat vegan. I am not unique.
Being vegan certainly puts you in a place where protein requirements are more challenging.
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Old 04-25-24, 02:54 AM
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To answer the original question, I eat almond butter instead of peanut butter. Healthier.

about protein, I target 2g/kg body weight consumed evenly through the day. Thatís usually 3 meals and a snack.

about fat, I target 1.3g/kg body weight.

the rest of my target calories for the day are from carbs.
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Old 04-26-24, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by RH Clark
More recent research has shown statins do not significantly increase lifespan and can have detrimental side effects. Please do your homework before going on statins.
Much less expensive to get medical advice from the internet than seeing a licensed doctor.
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Old 04-26-24, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by PromptCritical
Much less expensive to get medical advice from the internet than seeing a licensed doctor.
Yea, it's genius level to get all your information from one source. What do you think the chances of being prescribed a drug by someone trained to prescribe drugs from the drug companies is? Nobody asked you to take a stranger's advice from the internet smart guy, just to educate yourself about all options before making a critical decision.
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Old 05-14-24, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
The exception may be vegetarian endurance athletes, who need 1.4-2 gm of protein per kg of body weight.

For me (riding enough hours to have the same needs as an "endurance athlete"), that's up to 120 gm, which is hard to get from just nuts and twigs.

My high protein choices: peanut butter, soy milk beverage, greek yogurt, egg whites, black beans. I do a smoothie with whey protein some days.



No basis in science, as in none whatsoever? That appears to be an overstatement.

There is at least some evidence that reducing saturated fat reduces heart attack risk.

"The included long‐term trials suggested that reducing dietary saturated fat reduced the risk of combined cardiovascular events by 17%...

Evidence supports the reduction of saturated fat to reduce risk of combined cardiovascular events in people with and without existing cardiovascular disease, in men and women, over at least two years and in industrialised countries.
"

-- Hooper L, Martin N, Jimoh OF, Kirk C, Foster E, Abdelhamid AS. Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2020, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD011737. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011737.pub3.
Might be worth quoting the rest of that paper, rather than just cherry-picking one line:

"We found little or no effect of reducing saturated fat on all‐cause mortality or cardiovascular mortality"

"There was little or no effect of reducing saturated fats on non‐fatal myocardial infarction (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.07) or CHD mortality but effects on total (fatal or non‐fatal) myocardial infarction, stroke and CHD events (fatal or non‐fatal) were all unclear as the evidence was of very low quality."

"There was little or no effect on cancer mortality, cancer diagnoses, diabetes diagnosis, HDL cholesterol, serum triglycerides or blood pressure, and small reductions in weight, serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and BMI."



The only evidence put forward in that paper that reducing saturated fat could reduce the chance of a cardiovascular event required 56 people to reduce saturated fat for four years to prevent one event in one person, maybe possibly. The conclusion the authors make about reductions for two years to have an effect isn't supported by what is said in the paper, for which they have been criticised for. Amongst other criticisms of the paper:

- low quality evidence

- focusing purely on saturated fat, rather than types of saturated fats

- focusing on saturated fat rather than dietary patterns

- inability to account for other variables

- correlational data only: good for generating hypothesis, not good at proving causation, useless for making recommendations



The "no basis in science" is still accurate, because nutritional studies are too poor in quality to be considered anything other than a vaguely educated guess.


Edit: Further to explain: the 1 in 56 people benefiting from reducing saturated fat intake comes from the 8% of participants that had already suffered a cardiovascular event. In this specific and unique population, reductions of saturated may help reduce a reoccurrence of a further event due to interplay with existing structural damage. This won't be true for healthy individuals: in the same way a piece of bread won't bother a healthy person, but someone with celiac disease will certainly notice it.

Last edited by lklkl993; 05-14-24 at 08:22 PM.
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