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How sugar and processed foods effect your health.

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How sugar and processed foods effect your health.

Old 12-19-23, 07:48 AM
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How sugar and processed foods effect your health.

Very interesting and informative interview. Hope you enjoy.
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Old 12-19-23, 03:17 PM
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A study recently came out saying that one can get a perfectly healthy diet by eating 91% ultra-processed foods. I'm skeptical, but really haven't looked into the study to see how they came to that conclusion. I also wonder how much influence processed food companies had their hand in the study.

Here are a couple links for any one interested.


https://www.ars.usda.gov/news-events...ocessed-foods/




https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...ere-fell-short




.
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Old 12-19-23, 06:57 PM
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Three & a half hour vid? No thanks. How about the Cliff's Notes recap?
I began intermittent fasting two months ago. No breakfast and often going 24 hours between meals.
This coming from someone who religiously ate breakfast cereals with fruit for fifty-plus years.
Anyway, I lost twelve pounds so far and feel better than ever. Great gut health!
Targeting to lose another twenty, prior to our long foreign cruise in six months.
Most look at me and say I look fine weighing 175. Bringing it down to the 150's would improve my climbing!
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Old 12-20-23, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by work4bike
A study recently came out saying that one can get a perfectly healthy diet by eating 91% ultra-processed foods. I'm skeptical, but really haven't looked into the study to see how they came to that conclusion. I also wonder how much influence processed food companies had their hand in the study.

Here are a couple links for any one interested.


https://www.ars.usda.gov/news-events...ocessed-foods/


https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...ere-fell-short


.
The definition of UPF is too vague and the definition of a healthy diet is too simplistic to make any real conclusions. Iím sure this specific UPF based diet ticks all the relatively simplistic nutritional boxes, but probably doesnít address many of the other concerns with UPF.

From what Iíve read lately (mostly from Zoe Nutrition) the whole gut microbiome is complicated and very sensitive to the physical structure of what you eat. As I understand it, processed foods with the same nutritional value as unprocessed foods may have different affects on your gut microbiome.

Being pragmatic, it is probably better to avoid UPF whenever practical and focus more on the basics of nutrition. Not eating too much is enough of a challenge for most people, myself included.
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Old 12-20-23, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
The definition of UPF is too vague and the definition of a healthy diet is too simplistic to make any real conclusions. Iím sure this specific UPF based diet ticks all the relatively simplistic nutritional boxes, but probably doesnít address many of the other concerns with UPF.

From what Iíve read lately (mostly from Zoe Nutrition) the whole gut microbiome is complicated and very sensitive to the physical structure of what you eat. As I understand it, processed foods with the same nutritional value as unprocessed foods may have different affects on your gut microbiome.

Being pragmatic, it is probably better to avoid UPF whenever practical and focus more on the basics of nutrition. Not eating too much is enough of a challenge for most people, myself included.
Not only do different foods effect the microbiome but they effect many body functions and hormones differently. That's why all calories are not equal. I know it's a long video but it's quite interesting even if weight loss isn't a concern.

Ya'll know about my massive weight loss 5 years ago. I have done my best to study diet and nutrition ever since I started. I personally practice intermittent fasting about 90% of the time consuming 100% of my calories in a 4-6 hour window every day. I eat a varied diet of whole foods, and nothing ultra processed and very little sugar. It's a diet I have been able to live with and I've kept the weight off.
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Old 12-20-23, 08:35 PM
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I eat a lot and do it via whole foods and minimal sodium. Just generally the sodium thatís naturally in the food I eat.

My protein is yoghurt (I guess thatís processed), chicken, fish, occasionally beef. I season generally just pepper and spices

Carbs are potatoes rice and corn tortillas and beans. I stoped eating gluten and am at a point that I donít miss bread, bagels, pasta etc

Fat is cheese, olive oil, and small amounts of butter.

We eat out once a week or so and Iíll generally order a protein, simple carb and veg type meal.

I simply got more satisfied eating this way and lost my taste for processed food which seems to contain tons of added sodium and additives.

I fortunately donít have a sweet tooth but I guess my indulgence is about 10 tic tacs after dinner lol which are great to freshen your palate up
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Old 12-21-23, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by work4bike
A study recently came out saying that one can get a perfectly healthy diet by eating 91% ultra-processed foods.
"Brought to you by the 3 dominant manufacturers of processed food."

(cigarettes don't cause cancer)
[tobacco industry]
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Old 12-22-23, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by RH Clark
Not only do different foods effect the microbiome but they effect many body functions and hormones differently. That's why all calories are not equal. I know it's a long video but it's quite interesting even if weight loss isn't a concern.

Ya'll know about my massive weight loss 5 years ago. I have done my best to study diet and nutrition ever since I started. I personally practice intermittent fasting about 90% of the time consuming 100% of my calories in a 4-6 hour window every day. I eat a varied diet of whole foods, and nothing ultra processed and very little sugar. It's a diet I have been able to live with and I've kept the weight off.
I am glad it worked for you, but so what? Summer 2022 I was 65kg at 183cm (143 lbs at 6ft0) and I ate a **** ton of sugar for every long ride, and generally eat a ton of carbs and fibre. You are one data point, I am one data point. I am not talking about the comment on the gut microbiome, but the part about diet and weight. At the end of the day, the best diet for someone is the diet they can stick to.
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Old 12-22-23, 03:30 PM
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I'm sure there are lots of great points made in the video, but as a rule, doctors and institutions I've never heard of posting videos on Yuotube is rarely my first choice for health information.
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Old 12-22-23, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse
"Brought to you by the 3 dominant manufacturers of processed food."

(cigarettes don't cause cancer)
[tobacco industry]
Who wouldíve thunk!
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Old 12-22-23, 04:27 PM
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Here’s an example of a simple but nutritionally decently balanced meal:

All vegetables from our garden (“organic”), ground beef (black angus) from our freezer (raised by a farmer we know, grass fed on his land, no herbicides etc., finished by a butcher recommended by the farmer).

Last edited by Alan K; 01-20-24 at 12:47 PM.
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Old 12-22-23, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ZHVelo
I am glad it worked for you, but so what? Summer 2022 I was 65kg at 183cm (143 lbs at 6ft0) and I ate a **** ton of sugar for every long ride, and generally eat a ton of carbs and fibre. You are one data point, I am one data point. I am not talking about the comment on the gut microbiome, but the part about diet and weight. At the end of the day, the best diet for someone is the diet they can stick to.
Calories intake versus consumption during exercise is a matter of simple math - if your intake exceeds what you consume, the excess will have to go somewhere, which is usually storage as glycogen followed by fat.

But keeping in good health in the long haul involves considerably more than the above mentioned simple math. Even when you consume all the calories from sugar during exercise, you are still forcing your system to deal with large excursions in blood glucose levels from the optimum range. When you are young(er), your insulin cells do cope with this abuse fairly quickly but our abilities are not infinite.

A much better option in the long run is to consume complex carbohydrates with plenty of fibers to slow down sugar absorption. You will still get the energy you need but peaks of glucose in your blood will be lower, less taxing to your pancreas. Added benefit, you will learn a better way to nourish your body, a habit that will serve you well for a life-time.

Highly processed food is good only for the people who are hawking it and their shills. Human body didn’t evolve with this garbage so it is not likely to do well on it - it’s not very complicated.
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Old 12-22-23, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Alan K
Hereís an example of a simple but nutritionally decently balanced meal:



A simple meal (from this fall)

All vegetables are from our garden (ďorganicĒ), ground beef in this meal is part of the steer (black angus) in our freezer, raised by a farmer we know, grass fed on his land, no herbicides etc., finished by a butcher recommended by the farmer. [the next time, I may do the slicing and dicing myself, it canít be all that complicated; the butcher definitely stole some of the good cuts.]
That looks good but it needs some starchy carbs. Adding a little bit of white rice or white potatoes would make it even better. Looks very similar to what I make, but I also like to add a lot of fresh onions, bell peppers and garlic.
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Old 12-22-23, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
That looks good but it needs some starchy carbs. Adding a little bit of white rice or white potatoes would make it even better. Looks very similar to what I make, but I also like to add a lot of fresh onions, bell peppers and garlic.
It did have some red potatoes with skin, 3 different types of squash, two different colors of okra, some onions, garlic, jalapeŮo and herbs etc. We had planted 3 different colors of bell peppers but for some reason, they didn’t do well this year. We had poor yield of aubergines as well.

This time of the year, our vegetable choices reduce significantly because we cannot freeze all vegetables and have them taste good - green beans (4 different varieties do quite well even after freezing). Some things can be canned but we aren’t all that fond of canned things even when done by ourselves. Another couple of months and the cycle will be repeated.


Interesting thing about the red okra is that it doesn’t become fibrous like its green counterpart if you pick it a few days late.

Last edited by Alan K; 01-20-24 at 12:50 PM.
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Old 12-22-23, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Alan K
Calories intake versus consumption during exercise is a matter of simple math - if your intake exceeds what you consume, the excess will have to go somewhere, which is usually storage as glycogen followed by fat.

But keeping in good health in the long haul involves considerably more than the above mentioned simple math. Even when you consume all the calories from sugar during exercise, you are still forcing your system to deal with large excursions in blood glucose levels from the optimum range. When you are young(er), your insulin cells do cope with this abuse fairly quickly but our abilities are not infinite.

A much better option in the long run is to consume complex carbohydrates with plenty of fibers to slow down sugar absorption. You will still get the energy you need but peaks of glucose in your blood will be lower, less taxing to your pancreas. Added benefit, you will learn a better way to nourish your body, a habit that will serve you well for a life-time.

Highly processed food is good only for the people who are hawking it and their shills. Human body didnít evolve with this garbage so it is not likely to do well on it - itís not very complicated.
I didn't ask for a lecture or what will serve me well in life. But if you want to eat complex carbs and fibre on the bike, you go right ahead.
I never said anything about highly processed food.
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Old 12-23-23, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by ZHVelo
I didn't ask for a lecture or what will serve me well in life. But if you want to eat complex carbs and fibre on the bike, you go right ahead.
I never said anything about highly processed food.
Yeah, simple carbs on the bike (as required depending on intensity and duration) and complex carbs off the bike for me.
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Old 12-24-23, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by ZHVelo
I am glad it worked for you, but so what? Summer 2022 I was 65kg at 183cm (143 lbs at 6ft0) and I ate a **** ton of sugar for every long ride, and generally eat a ton of carbs and fibre. You are one data point, I am one data point. I am not talking about the comment on the gut microbiome, but the part about diet and weight. At the end of the day, the best diet for someone is the diet they can stick to.
I don't disagree if we are only talking body weight or fat percentages. Sugar can have many negative effects other than weight gain. That is the point of the video.
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Old 12-24-23, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by work4bike
A study recently came out saying that one can get a perfectly healthy diet by eating 91% ultra-processed foods. I'm skeptical ...

https://www.ars.usda.gov/news-events...ocessed-foods/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...ere-fell-short
I'm skeptical as well, for good reason. The USDA is about agriculture ... boosting it, supporting it, strangely buggering-up the normal and customary operation of it. They're certainly not in it for the healthy living of customers of those agricultural concerns they so lovingly are in bed with.

Just from the perspective of maintenance of a flourishing and healthy gut microbiome, it's awfully tough to maintain if the bulk of one's diet either doesn't help or specifically harms that microbiome. "Ultra-processed" foods are some of the worst culprits, along with a goodly number of the mad-scientist chemical additives placed in otherwise healthful foods.
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Old 12-24-23, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by RH Clark
Sugar can have many negative effects other than weight gain. That is the point of the video.
Sugar is only bad if consumed in excessive amounts, especially by people who are sedentary and who don't perform enough physical activity to burn all that sugar off for energy...Sugar is a non-issue for healthy people who consume it wisely and in moderation....The guy in the video Robert Lustig isn't a credible source information on nutrition. His nutrition advice is inaccurate and misleading.
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Old 12-24-23, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by RH Clark
I don't disagree if we are only talking body weight or fat percentages. Sugar can have many negative effects other than weight gain. That is the point of the video.
Except when you are burning it off immediately because you are exercising, those negative side effects don't really occur. But as I said, if you worry about that, do eat complex carbs and fibre on the bike. I'd be curious to know how many grams of carbs you can tolerate per hour on 4+ hour rides this way.
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Old 12-25-23, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
Sugar is only bad if consumed in excessive amounts, especially by people who are sedentary and who don't perform enough physical activity to burn all that sugar off for energy...Sugar is a non-issue for healthy people who consume it wisely and in moderation....The guy in the video Robert Lustig isn't a credible source information on nutrition. His nutrition advice is inaccurate and misleading.
Who would you consider to be a credible source of information in regard to sugar and its effects on the body?
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Old 12-25-23, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by ZHVelo
Except when you are burning it off immediately because you are exercising, those negative side effects don't really occur. But as I said, if you worry about that, do eat complex carbs and fibre on the bike. I'd be curious to know how many grams of carbs you can tolerate per hour on 4+ hour rides this way.
Quite a lot, apparently. Pro riders have greatly increased their in-race consumption of carbs in the last couple of years. The target is now around 100 grams of carbs per hour for long road races. Apparently they have to work up to being able to tolerate ingesting carbs at that level.
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Old 12-25-23, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Who would you consider to be a credible source of information in regard to sugar and its effects on the body?
Are you kidding, or did you not pay attention to his earlier posts? All nutritional science is junk science.
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Old 12-25-23, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
Quite a lot, apparently. Pro riders have greatly increased their in-race consumption of carbs in the last couple of years. The target is now around 100 grams of carbs per hour for long road races. Apparently they have to work up to being able to tolerate ingesting carbs at that level.
They are eating sugars, not complex carbs and fibre.
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Old 12-25-23, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by ZHVelo
They are eating sugars, not complex carbs and fibre.
"I'd be curious to know how many grams of carbs you can tolerate per hour on 4+ hour rides this way."---ZHVelo.

From this site:

Are simple or complex carbs better for cycling?
The intensity of your workout affects digestion and absorption. On high-intensity rides stick to carbs that are simple and easy to absorb. Low-intensity rides offer more opportunities for solids and complex carbs. You can prevent palate fatigue on a long ride with a variety of solid foods.

Last edited by Trakhak; 12-25-23 at 12:28 PM.
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