Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Training & Nutrition
Reload this Page >

Sports Nutritionist

Notices
Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

Sports Nutritionist

Old 05-17-24, 10:37 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PromptCritical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Location: San Diego
Posts: 555

Bikes: Columbine, Paramount Track Bike, Colnago Super, Santana Tandems (1995 & 2007), Gary Fisher Piranha, Trek Wahoo, Bianchi Track Bike, a couple of Honda mountain bikes

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Liked 184 Times in 119 Posts
Sports Nutritionist

With so much conflicting information on the interwebs about diet, nutrition and dieting, I'm considering a sports nutritionist.

Has anyone used one?
__________________
Cheers, Mike
PromptCritical is offline  
Likes For PromptCritical:
Old 05-17-24, 12:40 PM
  #2  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 15,347

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6387 Post(s)
Liked 4,982 Times in 3,430 Posts
You might get this out in front of more members if you post in the Road Bike or General sub-forum! <GRIN>

Your audience here might be fewer people. So less chance of finding those who have used a sports nutritionist. And just as much chance of hearing all the bias of each of us!



Mostly I'm just funning with you since I saw this in the road bike forum. And you seemed to abandon that at the first suggestion replied.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 05-17-24, 02:15 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PromptCritical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Location: San Diego
Posts: 555

Bikes: Columbine, Paramount Track Bike, Colnago Super, Santana Tandems (1995 & 2007), Gary Fisher Piranha, Trek Wahoo, Bianchi Track Bike, a couple of Honda mountain bikes

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Liked 184 Times in 119 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01

Mostly I'm just funning with you since I saw this in the road bike forum. And you seemed to abandon that at the first suggestion replied.
Nice to see some humor here!
__________________
Cheers, Mike
PromptCritical is offline  
Old 05-17-24, 05:59 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 623 Post(s)
Liked 519 Times in 290 Posts
I get a lot of good science-based advice from Andrew Huberman podcast. He is about as objective as I have found. There are always conflicting opinions even in well reviewed science. Even nutritionists have changed their opinions and recommendations as understanding has progressed.

Here is one you might enjoy.

Last edited by RH Clark; 05-17-24 at 06:02 PM.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 05-17-24, 10:00 PM
  #5  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,624

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 1,987 Times in 1,416 Posts
No, though I've read the usual books which didn't seem to tell me anything I didn't already know.

I don't think it's that complicated. We're not that different from the usual suspects. What works for most folks in terms of health and longevity should work for us. Thus: either the DASH or Med diet. Those diets have produced the best results in long term tests. Use olive oil where appropriate. And on the bike, consume half your kJ in carbs. I've had the best results taking in small quantities every 15' - 30'. The harder I go, the more frequently I have something. Except never just before or during a pass climb. Eat at the top. Otherwise on the bike keep the osmolality of what you consume low. Getting it across the stomach wall is half the battle.

Dieting is easy in concept. Eat normally, just less. There doesn't seem to be any method other that for which results stay good after a year of doing whatever that was. It's a long race, adopt a moderate pace.

Protein: Lots of controversy there, I think because athletes vary in terms of age, sport, practice, and metabolism. Getting a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel done once a year will tell you if you're getting too much. My wife and I have taken about 40g of whey in divided doses throughout the day for many years. Seems about right for us with our plant-based diet.

Supplements: I don't think any nutritionist in their right mind would recommend anything because there's like zero unbiased testing for that stuff. That said, I use quite a few supplements, some of which don't seem to do much, others quite the opposite. But that's just for me, not necessarily for thee.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 05-17-24, 10:09 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PromptCritical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Location: San Diego
Posts: 555

Bikes: Columbine, Paramount Track Bike, Colnago Super, Santana Tandems (1995 & 2007), Gary Fisher Piranha, Trek Wahoo, Bianchi Track Bike, a couple of Honda mountain bikes

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Liked 184 Times in 119 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
No, though I've read the usual books which didn't seem to tell me anything I didn't already know.

I don't think it's that complicated. We're not that different from the usual suspects. What works for most folks in terms of health and longevity should work for us. Thus: either the DASH or Med diet. Those diets have produced the best results in long term tests. Use olive oil where appropriate. And on the bike, consume half your kJ in carbs. I've had the best results taking in small quantities every 15' - 30'. The harder I go, the more frequently I have something. Except never just before or during a pass climb. Eat at the top. Otherwise on the bike keep the osmolality of what you consume low. Getting it across the stomach wall is half the battle.

Dieting is easy in concept. Eat normally, just less. There doesn't seem to be any method other that for which results stay good after a year of doing whatever that was. It's a long race, adopt a moderate pace.

Protein: Lots of controversy there, I think because athletes vary in terms of age, sport, practice, and metabolism. Getting a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel done once a year will tell you if you're getting too much. My wife and I have taken about 40g of whey in divided doses throughout the day for many years. Seems about right for us with our plant-based diet.

Supplements: I don't think any nutritionist in their right mind would recommend anything because there's like zero unbiased testing for that stuff. That said, I use quite a few supplements, some of which don't seem to do much, others quite the opposite. But that's just for me, not necessarily for thee.
Yeah, that's kinda what I'm thinking, but I'm getting old and want to be in better shape than my Dad.
__________________
Cheers, Mike
PromptCritical is offline  
Old 05-18-24, 05:28 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 12,335

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10239 Post(s)
Liked 5,962 Times in 3,213 Posts
Sports nutrition seems to me like a coaching specialty: stuff about race fueling and periodizing diet for a competitive training schedule, rather than a primary focus on long term health. If performance isn’t your primary goal, I think a good registered dietician might be a better bet.
MoAlpha is offline  
Likes For MoAlpha:
Old 05-18-24, 09:06 AM
  #8  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,624

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 1,987 Times in 1,416 Posts
Originally Posted by PromptCritical
Yeah, that's kinda what I'm thinking, but I'm getting old and want to be in better shape than my Dad.
Sure. In the US, that's usually not that hard, but was your dad an athlete? That's another story. The whole idea that one can eat their way to better health has very gradually invaded the US population. I remember when I was working in a grocery store at 14, stocking the bread shelves, so 1959, legal back then, this lady started haranguing me about how white bread was ruining our health. I thought she was nuts, certifiable. It's been a long journey.

As one can surmise from the varied views of folks on this forum, exercise and how that's done is much more effective at getting one in shape than is any particular diet - as long as one is not doing some fairly elite bike racing. The further up the slope one is, the more important tiny things become, including small difference in exercise modality. I've gotten good results simply by increasing my mileage, say 5000 miles/year, Z2 during the week, +2 gym days, then one murderous 4 hour competitive group ride on Sunday. You do that, it kinda doesn't matter what you eat as long as what you eat allows you to do that. That's the trick. That said, the diet I advocate above will do that. I also know a fast woman whose favorite recovery meal is steak and wine. So there's that. As an after-ride pain solvent, I prefer beer, which one is also warned against.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 05-18-24, 10:09 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PromptCritical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Location: San Diego
Posts: 555

Bikes: Columbine, Paramount Track Bike, Colnago Super, Santana Tandems (1995 & 2007), Gary Fisher Piranha, Trek Wahoo, Bianchi Track Bike, a couple of Honda mountain bikes

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Liked 184 Times in 119 Posts
I have two specific challenges I’d like to address. Avoiding diabetes as our family has a predisposition toward it at older ages. The other is the balance of calories and ingredients since my cycling output varies so much on a daily basis (2 60+ mile rides per week).

I know you can’t eat your way to health, but you sure can eat your way to poor health.
__________________
Cheers, Mike
PromptCritical is offline  
Old 05-18-24, 09:58 PM
  #10  
Version 7.0
 
Hermes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: SoCal
Posts: 13,178

Bikes: Too Many

Mentioned: 297 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1367 Post(s)
Liked 2,534 Times in 1,489 Posts
My wife and I have been using one since August of last year that was referred to us by a member of our racing team. The advice/nutrition plan has been a game changer for us improving our body composition, recovery, strength, endurance, power, weight and blood metrics as well as other matters.

Getting into a specific nutrition program with objective feedback based upon blood metrics, body composition and performance is something one has to try to see if it works for the individual.
Hermes is offline  
Likes For Hermes:
Old 05-20-24, 12:39 PM
  #11  
Meet me at spin class!!!!
 
HeyItsSara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: NY
Posts: 393

Bikes: Precor recumbant indoor bike, Stages bike at Equinox gym

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 59 Posts
i've see a nutritionist which my health insurance paid for. i learned a lot!
HeyItsSara is offline  
Likes For HeyItsSara:
Old 05-21-24, 08:19 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 8,611

Bikes: CAAD 12, MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1816 Post(s)
Liked 1,346 Times in 781 Posts
I have The Cyclist's Food Guide by Nancy Clark, MS, RD and Jenny Hegmann, MS, RD. It might be of interest.to you.

https://www.amazon.com/Cyclists-Food.../dp/0971891125
bruce19 is offline  
Likes For bruce19:
Old 05-22-24, 07:39 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PromptCritical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Location: San Diego
Posts: 555

Bikes: Columbine, Paramount Track Bike, Colnago Super, Santana Tandems (1995 & 2007), Gary Fisher Piranha, Trek Wahoo, Bianchi Track Bike, a couple of Honda mountain bikes

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Liked 184 Times in 119 Posts
Originally Posted by Hermes
My wife and I have been using one since August of last year that was referred to us by a member of our racing team. The advice/nutrition plan has been a game changer for us improving our body composition, recovery, strength, endurance, power, weight and blood metrics as well as other matters.

Getting into a specific nutrition program with objective feedback based upon blood metrics, body composition and performance is something one has to try to see if it works for the individual.
That is exactly what Im looking for. Would you mind sharing a referral?
__________________
Cheers, Mike
PromptCritical is offline  
Old 05-22-24, 08:51 AM
  #14  
Version 7.0
 
Hermes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: SoCal
Posts: 13,178

Bikes: Too Many

Mentioned: 297 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1367 Post(s)
Liked 2,534 Times in 1,489 Posts
Originally Posted by PromptCritical
That is exactly what Im looking for. Would you mind sharing a referral?
PM sent.
Hermes is offline  
Old 05-23-24, 03:36 AM
  #15  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2024
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 3 Posts
ou

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
No, though I've read the usual books which didn't seem to tell me anything I didn't already know.

I don't think it's that complicated. We're not that different from the usual suspects. What works for most folks in terms of health and longevity should work for us. Thus: either the DASH or Med diet. Those diets have produced the best results in long term tests. Use olive oil where appropriate. And on the bike, consume half your kJ in carbs. I've had the best results taking in small quantities every 15' - 30'. The harder I go, the more frequently I have something. Except never just before or during a pass climb. Eat at the top. Otherwise on the bike keep the osmolality of what you consume low. Getting it across the stomach wall is half the battle.

Dieting is easy in concept. Eat normally, just less. There doesn't seem to be any method other that for which results stay good after a year of doing whatever that was. It's a long race, adopt a moderate pace.

Protein: Lots of controversy there, I think because athletes vary in terms of age, sport, practice, and metabolism. Getting a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel done once a year will tell you if you're getting too much. My wife and I have taken about 40g of whey in divided doses throughout the day for many years. Seems about right for us with our plant-based diet.

Supplements: I don't think any nutritionist in their right mind would recommend anything because there's like zero unbiased testing for that stuff. Also, I take mullein leaf which is totally organic and good for raspiratory health. It's very important to take care of the lungs and cleanse your respiratory system, and it naturally supports it. That said, I use quite a few supplements, some of which don't seem to do much, others quite the opposite. But that's just for me, not necessarily for thee.
And when it comes to supplements, how do you decide what to take? You choose something based on information online, research, etc, or you speak to specialists?
I want to try some new supplements which are organic, and I don't know if there is a need.

Last edited by TroyMeister; 05-24-24 at 02:17 AM.
TroyMeister is offline  
Old 05-23-24, 09:01 AM
  #16  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,624

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 1,987 Times in 1,416 Posts
Originally Posted by TroyMeister
And when it comes to supplements, how do you decide what to take? You choose something based on information online, research, etc, or you speak to specialists?
I want to try some new supplements which are organic, and I don't know if there is a need.
Google and read studies. Some studies are reliable, some not. If the study was done by the folks who make the supplement, maybe yes, maybe no. I've seen both. Doctors will almost always say they don't work because they're scientists first and ignore everything that hasn't been certified by reliable authority, which in their profession is a good idea. Almost all supplements are in a gray area because everything is all about the money, right? So I read what I can find and experiment on myself, see if I notice a difference. The tricky part is that some supplements take months or years to show an effect. IOW now that one's knees are all messed up is a little late to look for a fix. So there's that.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 09:30 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 623 Post(s)
Liked 519 Times in 290 Posts
Nutrition is a very controversial subject. Personally, I am extremely skeptical of all studies. For one thing it's important to know how to evaluate studies. For another many of the nutrition studies have flawed data from the start just by the nature of nutrition survey studies.. I looked at one not long ago that was interesting because it had a large number of participants over more than 10 years. When I looked into how the information was gathered it consisted of 2 surveys taken by telephone one at the beginning and one at the end. There is no way the average person will accurately report on their diet by such a survey.

For another thing, long term accurate studies just aren't going to be done with the goal of determining the proper human diet. These type studies would take millions of research dollars with no payoff in the end except a list of foods to eat. Studies are funded by people interested in making money on a product and so that will be the goal.


IMHO
Some of the best information we have on a proper human diet would have to come from blue zone studies.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 05-24-24, 07:25 PM
  #18  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,624

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 1,987 Times in 1,416 Posts
Originally Posted by RH Clark
Nutrition is a very controversial subject. Personally, I am extremely skeptical of all studies. For one thing it's important to know how to evaluate studies. For another many of the nutrition studies have flawed data from the start just by the nature of nutrition survey studies.. I looked at one not long ago that was interesting because it had a large number of participants over more than 10 years. When I looked into how the information was gathered it consisted of 2 surveys taken by telephone one at the beginning and one at the end. There is no way the average person will accurately report on their diet by such a survey.

For another thing, long term accurate studies just aren't going to be done with the goal of determining the proper human diet. These type studies would take millions of research dollars with no payoff in the end except a list of foods to eat. Studies are funded by people interested in making money on a product and so that will be the goal.


IMHO
Some of the best information we have on a proper human diet would have to come from blue zone studies.
Sorry, those are also worthless.
https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/blu...isinformation/

Some folks at JAMA looked at all the nutritional studies published there over the past few years and found that 83% were contaminated by researcher bias. That said, that still leaves the 17%! Helps to read a lot of studies and look at the authors' admissions of bias.

Another interesting factor is that real science involves disproving what was previously known, thus the goal of every scientist is to have their theories disproven. And that happens with fair regularity in the nutrition field as we have seen over the decades.

That said, mostly plant based diets like DASH and Med have the best records in terms of staying out of the hospital, especially when combined with aerobic exercise, though there are no guarantees.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.