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Wool sweaters

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Old 08-24-18, 01:47 PM
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no motor?
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Wool sweaters

An upcoming move has inspired to think about getting rid of things before I move, as well as using some things for different purposes. I've got a few thicker sweaters that fall in that category, ones I don't wear very often due to them being too scratchy to wear to work or for casual use without several layers between them and my skin. I'm wondering how well these might work to wear while bike commuting in the colder temperatures (I usually ride until it gets too slippery to ride without studs), especially as my new home will be about 8 miles from work. I've got enough cold weather gear as it is to ride without them, but would rather not give these away if they'd work better than the synthetic gear I've used before. Especially after finding out how comfortable an old pair of wool dress pants are in the cold. Anyone use something like these?
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Old 08-27-18, 09:50 AM
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zze86
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Yes. Wool is great in the winter. I sweat a lot irregardless of the number of layers so a material like wool, which can keep its warming properties even when wet, is essential.
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Old 09-04-18, 07:40 PM
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I'm also a huge fan of wool - especially in more humid winter climates, like here in western Wisconsin.

As far as thicker wool sweaters, I tend to use them as a kind of mid-layer in colder weather (everyone is different, but somewhere around 20F for flat rides or 15F for hilly rides). I wear one over a base layer (usually a really thin merino layer). I've had wool get completely soaked, and I haven't died or lost any toes yet, so it seems to be working.

I bet they'd work as a single layer under a jacket in warmer winter weather as well.
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Old 09-05-18, 07:16 AM
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Base layer + Wool sweater + wind breaker on top is a great winter setup

In my experience the sweater alone is not good enough because wind will get through it. But paired with a wind breaker I will use this until its about 20F or -5C. Then I take out my winter jacket
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Old 09-05-18, 12:52 PM
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Yes, you do need a windbreaker shell. Then your wool sweater can act as an isolating mid layer, on top of your base layer.

Sometimes, when I commute, I add a shirt with a thin wool sweater.

Remember not to wear too thick!
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Old 09-05-18, 12:58 PM
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Absolutely. I have repurposed some old moth-eaten sweaters as baselayers. I cut off the sleeves and then washed them to shrink them. Great under a longsleeved jersey in the winter.
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Old 09-05-18, 10:35 PM
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Fun thing to do, is to cut the sleeves off a wool sweater and then use them as (long, or short) arm warmers. Perfect for in between seasons. You can easily shorten them, or pull them off while riding. You know, as an experiment I wore some new (synthetic) arm warmers in combination with a thermo shirt last winter. But it didn’t feel right, wasn’t too comfortable at all. Wool (or maybe a fleece?) next to skin may be the next phase ...
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Old 09-17-18, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Bikewolf View Post
Yes, you do need a windbreaker shell. Then your wool sweater can act as an isolating mid layer, on top of your base layer.

Sometimes, when I commute, I add a shirt with a thin wool sweater.

Remember not to wear too thick!
I usually need a couple of layers between my skin and the wool when I'm not riding, how does the extra exertion from riding change the itchiness of wool?
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Old 09-17-18, 07:27 PM
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Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
I usually need a couple of layers between my skin and the wool when I'm not riding, how does the extra exertion from riding change the itchiness of wool?
Wool also itches me but not Merino wool so that's what I wear as base layer when temperature gets colder.
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Old 09-17-18, 11:01 PM
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@no motor?:
I’m not sure I understand you. All I know is that some people like wool, others don’t (e.g. wool type, skin sensibility).

In winter, and that is for my commute, I might trade a fleece for a wool sweater (still got a bunch of them so why not use them) as a mid layer. Underneath that a base layer, sometimes a shirt in between.
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Old 09-17-18, 11:41 PM
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The 2000s vs 1930s. Wool can still has its place in the fashion environment. Otherwise, it time to leave wool in the past where it belongs. That's particularly true when it concerns athletic apparel.
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Old 09-18-18, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikewolf View Post
@no motor?:
Iím not sure I understand you. All I know is that some people like wool, others donít (e.g. wool type, skin sensibility).

In winter, and that is for my commute, I might trade a fleece for a wool sweater (still got a bunch of them so why not use them) as a mid layer. Underneath that a base layer, sometimes a shirt in between.
Wool sweaters irritate my skin unless it's Merino or I have enough layers between my skin and the wool sweater to keep me from feeling the wool. Wool socks or a wool hat don't bother me.
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Old 09-26-18, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
The 2000s vs 1930s. Wool can still has its place in the fashion environment. Otherwise, it time to leave wool in the past where it belongs. That's particularly true when it concerns athletic apparel.
Never used merino wool base layers in that hot CA sun? So many would disagree with you. Non stink, doesn't feel clammy and wet, retains its warmth during sweaty activity. Not itchy. Ibex, smartwool, patagonia and every other outdoor sports company makes all kind of wool, wool blend base, mid and outer layers. Maybe one should do some research before making ( wool) blanket statements. I love it when the CA and FL types try to chime in on " winter" and " cold" rides, way funny. Cold is not 50F, cold is when the gaotorade slush freezes solid. Cheers.

Last edited by Leebo; 09-26-18 at 07:52 AM.
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Old 09-30-18, 03:03 PM
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I like the brooks brothers sweaters - still good for work and made of wool.
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Old 10-09-18, 11:57 AM
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I like Smartwool merino wool base layers year round. Used a short sleeve and long sleeve version this summer, including on a week long backcountry trip. For that trip I also wore Icebreaker wool boxers instead of padded shorts. As temps drop I'll add wool socks and a wool hat under the helmet. When it drops to near or below freezing I'll add a wool mid layer. Below zero F I switch from a thin synthetic balaclava to a wool one.

On my week long trip I was soaked for three straight days. The wool boxers kept me from getting any saddle sores. Not sure padded shorts would have done the same.
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Old 10-11-18, 12:31 AM
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Wool sweaters? I don't like Wool sweaters, but I have to wear them.
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Old 10-15-18, 10:58 AM
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I love wool. ❤ For those with sensitive skin, just use 2 layers. Merino wool or Lamb's wool are both very soft, yet affordable, or you can splurge on cashmere.
For real warmth in tough conditions though, that scratchy stuff is great. I have one made in Ireland, that's almost too warm to wear, indoors.
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