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Thread: Whole or Frame?

  1. #1
    Classic. ssindosk8rss's Avatar
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    Whole or Frame?

    Hey guys,

    I just wanted to know if it was better to buy a BI Kilo frame or a BD whole bike. The things I plan on changing if i get the whole bike are the saddle, pedals/clips, stem, bars.

    Basically I'm just keeping the stock wheelset, crank, seatpost, chain, and headset.

    I know I'd be getting a good deal on the frame but is it really worth it to buy the whole bike?

  2. #2
    Nü-Fred ichitz's Avatar
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    If budget is an issue for you, or if you don't have much knowledge in building a bike, or if you want to hop on the bike and ride as soon as it gets here, then get a complete.
    Quote Originally Posted by dsh View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fixedgear80 View Post
    once you go fixed.....
    ...you generally go back in like a year.
    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...ig_mercier.jpg http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...ig_3rensho.jpg http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...ig_peugeot.jpg

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    With what you're looking at replacing, buy the complete bike, the things you're looking at replacing aren't that expensive or complicated to replace. You're keeping the major components. You could replace all those parts easily yourself, if you don't have bike experience, doing the Headset and BB might not be easy/cheap for you.

    I personally, almost wish I had gone with a frameset and built it, but I'm glad I don't have to mess with the BB or headset as those seem to be the most complicated components. I've replaced the wheelset, rear cog, seat, pedals/straps, chain, and bartape so far. Looking at replacing the Stem and bars next month.
    Kilo TT

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    i built up from a BI kilo frame. whole process was educational. got the satisfaction of putting together a great looking bike that rides amazing at the price i wanted. couldnt be happier

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    If you build it up yourself you will almost certainly end up spending more than you think. Especially as you will need tools or be making several trips to the bike shop for installation. The up side is that you will get to pick out each one of the components, learn a lot and get the bonus points of being able to say "Yeah, I built that one up myself." Honestly though, if you're on a budget and you only want to change a few easily removed/installed parts I would buy a complete bike and swap out parts as the money comes in.

    Oh yeah, also buying parts online tends to be a long slow process so don't expect to be riding that thing any time soon.

  6. #6
    Senior Member filtersweep's Avatar
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    The money you "save" buying a built bike and throwing away everything but the frame.... well, you get the idea. I roll my own. Long term, it delivers better value and saves money. Sure, right now you might think you want to keep the wheels and drive train.....

  7. #7
    . xavier853's Avatar
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    I like to build up from a frame. That way I can just buy the parts I want.

    If I buy a whole bike I end up changing all the parts anyway because they are crap. Why not just skip that step.

    And I like the feeling of knowing I built it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member illdthedj's Avatar
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    im basically regurgitating what has already been said lol:

    if you want to ride ASAP, and on a budget, get the complete.

    if you want something you custom built/tailored to yourself, arn't too worried about money and/or time, and have either the knowledge to build a bike or know someone that can help you out, build it yourself.


    i was debating this myself a few months back, and ended up choosing to build myself. i already had a bike, so i wasn't hard up for a bike ASAP.
    i also spent way more than i thought i would or would have if i got a complete, HOWEVER over a few months i set some money from each paycheck aside to pay parts....so every 2 weeks the bike grew piece by piece....so the spending wasn't all at once, it was stretched out which wasn't so bad on me economically. Also, since i decided to build the bike myself, i decided when looking at parts to splurge a bit more and get really nice components at times, where if i had bought the bike all at once would have settled for less. In the end, the bike came out to be better (in my opinion) than anything i could buy stock for the price.

    Also, another thing.... i knew VERY LITTLE about bikes in general before deciding to build. However, needing to buy components forced me to learn about each component, so I sort of thought of the additional cost of building the bike instead of getting the complete as going towards bike education. Stuff i didn't know about, like say, installing a headset or crankset, i needed to learn about before going ahead, so i consulted the internet, my brother (ex-bike mechanic), and my local LBS.


    so in the end, i got a really cool (at least in my eyes lol) bike and learned a ton in exchange for time and money. a trade off i think is worth it.

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    Senior Member preston811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by illdthedj View Post
    so in the end, i got a really cool (at least in my eyes lol) bike and learned a ton in exchange for time and money. a trade off i think is worth it.
    pics or it didn't happen lol

    OP: Builds are way more $, as everyone has said, just price all the parts in a spreadsheet and you'll see. As in, building up a BI frame would cost 2x what a BD complete would, unless you have parts lying around, are getting used bits, or are a supreme sale hunter. When you buy a complete, a lot of the savings of the wholesale parts gets passed on to you, you're basically getting a bulk discount, plus the assembly/knowledge/tools etc all are basically free. (although a BD pre-build is not idiot proof, you still need to at least tighten the cog+lockring and be sure the headset is adjusted right and wheels trued).

    The advantage to a BI frame though is you can get logo-less, or that chromed KiloTT Deluxe. And it'd be very educational and some would say satisfying/fun, just get ready to drop $$.

    I would also like to speak against a common notion that the parts on stock bikes are "all crap and must eventually be replaced". It's not the case. I can't speak for BD bikes (and neither do I recommend them if you're on the fence or just starting out), but contrary to what many seem to believe, you don't need all cream-of-the-crop parts to have a sweet ride. Completely decking out a bike is only for bragging rights, or track racing, or people with more dollars than sense just imo. A stock Steamroller doesn't look like much on paper but it's plenty of bike for most people, nothing on it is "crap". Even BD bikes, if you replace the pedals and saddle, and make sure the wheels are true and everything's adjusted/tightened properly, I'm sure you can get many miles on it before needing or wanting to upgrade anything else.

    YMMV

  10. #10
    Senior Member illdthedj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by preston811 View Post
    pics or it didn't happen lol

    YMMV


    it happened!
    lets just say, yes you are right, i probably paid way more than i would have if i got a complete.
    but then again building a complete when i knew very little about bikes resulted in forcing myself to learn about everything on the bike.

    so the extra money was worth having a bike im proud to ride because i built it myself, on top of a bike i like the looks of way more than anything i could get complete (nothing wrong with appreciating aesthetics of something despite the point of the object is function), and on top of learning allot/bike education....as well as enjoying the process of building it up.

    anywho but yes you are right, im sure a BD bike is more than enough of a good bike for most of us here....and if you are strapped for cash and need a bike ASAP thats definitely the way to go.

  11. #11
    Classic. ssindosk8rss's Avatar
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    Oh I see. Budget is an issue for me (That's the only reason I'd be keeping the cranks and wheelset etc for the whole bike). But i feel like i could make a quality build up from a frame only. I have experience in taking apart bikes and putting them together. I got a bottom bracket remover and a friend who can install headsets so I'm not really worried about that.

    My build right now if it was a FRAME only would be

    A TT Frameset
    A Sugino RD2 Crank + BB
    Track drops (maybe a nitto but I'm getting greedy )
    A whatever headset, stem and seatpost that look decently good
    A basic wheelset as in something that is similar to the stock ones that come with the complete TT but maybe nicer hubs haha. (Anyone know where I could get a good set for around 100 or I might just buy someone's used BD wheelset)
    Brooks saddle.

    Knowing that I'm going to use those components, I don't want to waste my time buying the complete bike and having crap parts laying around. But The complete bike does come as a pretty good deal and does come with the whatever seatpost, stem and headset...

    EDIT: Oh and time isn't really a factor. I have a different bike I converted from a road bike to a single speed so that's where i learned how to take the bike apart and put it all together. The only factor im concerned about is Budget vs. Quality. If quality increases, I'm not afraid to put in a little more. If budget increases, quality better increase. But things like the Truvativ Tauro vs the Sugino RD2 Crankset, I don't know if that'll really make a difference in functionality. I know its an upgrade in quality but will i really notice the difference?
    Last edited by ssindosk8rss; 04-23-10 at 04:25 PM.

  12. #12
    . bbattle's Avatar
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    Get a complete bike first. Ride it as is until parts need replacing. By that time, you'll have learned more about bike maintenance and what parts need upgrading and what parts are just fine. Be sure to read all of www.sheldonbrown.com and learn to use the Search function on this forum before asking lots of newbie questions that just catch you a lot of flak.

    Save the "roll your own" for later when you've figured out if you really want that Keirin frame or the '84 Colnago Super to build up.

    My next roadie project will cost me well over $1k to build up using Campagnolo, Cinelli and Mavic parts.

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    ^hotttt

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    Senior Member TheBikeRollsOn's Avatar
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    Jesus Christ, don't tell me you plan on riding that thing.

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