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Build-a-bike

Old 01-17-18, 07:46 AM
  #1  
Gerry221
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Build-a-bike

Hi


This has probably been covered on a few threads, so apologies.....


I am relatively new to the joys of cycling. Only started last July. But I do love it.


I was thinking this year to try and build my own, unique bike. Something that would do me for a few years. My budget would be around £600 - £700. Most, if not all parts would be 2nd hand. There are a good few deals to be had!


I was looking for advice on what is best for me....


I am 52 yrs old. I am quite a heavy guy, 20 stone, but lost over 3 stone in the last 6 months. I will continue to drop the stones! My typical ride is between 20 - 30 miles. Avg speed around 14mph. Working on doing larger hills.....so far I try and minimise the climbing - not easy where I live!


So, question is, what frame do I go for? Bearing in mind my budget. Is it a steel(my mate, a keen cyclist, thought this would be my best option), aluminium, carbon....?


Gear ratio? This is something I am not 100% clear on.


Campagnolo or Shimano or....???? What is best to suit my needs?


Tyres?....size 23c 0r 25c or....?


Wheels??? Think along with the frame will be the best I can buy. Anyone have any idea if there are good"budget" wheels or best to buy 2nd hand?


The frame I am planning to get custom painted and add my own graphics. Or again, would it be better to buy a frame in the £350 price region?


Thanks for advice....


If posted in wrong forum, my apologies.....
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Old 01-17-18, 08:01 AM
  #2  
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Pop over to the Clydesdale subforum. There's a lot of discussion on wheels, etc.
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Old 01-17-18, 08:17 AM
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Most posters on this site are in the US. Scotland is not familiar from a bike POV in the availability of frames and parts. UK has
some superb low priced (from US standpoint) internet suppliers: Ribble, Chain Reaction, Probikekit and several others
for everything you need. Custom paint will add £100-200 to the frame cost if someone else does it.

Steel is your best bet at your weight. Tire size: minimum 25, better 28-32mm, maybe even 35-38 mm. Wheels should
have at least 32 spokes. Avoid any wheels sold as "light weight" ie under 1700 or so grams for the set.

Gearing: optimal is 9-10 spd for cost, cassette in the 11/12 to 32-34 tooth range. I would look for an ATB/mtn chainset
with gearing in the 24/32/40 or 44t range. This will get you over the hills and a reasonable high speed for those days
on the flat with tail winds. You can get cassettes with larger tooth #s but they tend to cost more, be 11 spd and meant
for single chainwheel bikes meant for people half your age and weight.

Shimano has the most accomodating range of equipment for your requirements. It would help to know what you are
riding now. I was recently in Arbroath and was surprised by a small coop store selling used bikes for cheap.

Last edited by sch; 01-17-18 at 08:56 AM.
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Old 01-17-18, 08:30 AM
  #4  
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I seldom say "Don't do it" but this to me is clearly where I lean heavily to that advice. Doing what you propose is expensive and time consuming, especially in comparison to the benefits received. There is no way for anyone here to easily tell you definitively what frame is best, what gear ratios to use, or how to judge and match parts - even less so if they are used. That you would even consider a 23mm tire at a current weight of 280 lbs. tells me you know very little about your own needs. Frame choice, as well as bars and stem, depend on your anatomy and type of usage. Components must be compatible with your frame, with each other, and with your fitness level and terrain you deal with. Your needs and preferences will easily and likely change over a period of a few years. You may need various tools that will be used very seldom once the bike is built. Finally, the bragging value of a "unique" bike is overrated, especially when balanced against the time and money cost. It is much easier and no less useful to modify an existing new or used bike to meet your specific needs. One can always custom paint a bike without starting from scratch, for example. You are not even at the point of understanding all of the variables that need to be addressed.

Here's a recent thread on the subject that may help: Building your own bike but my best advice if you are close to Edinburgh or Aberdeen is to avail yourself of a bike co-op, where you can obtain in-person assistance with getting a bike to meet your needs.

Last edited by cny-bikeman; 01-17-18 at 10:11 AM.
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Old 01-17-18, 10:43 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by cny-bikeman View Post
I seldom say "Don't do it" but this to me is clearly where I lean heavily to that advice. Doing what you propose is expensive and time consuming, especially in comparison to the benefits received. There is no way for anyone here to easily tell you definitively what frame is best, what gear ratios to use, or how to judge and match parts - even less so if they are used. That you would even consider a 23mm tire at a current weight of 280 lbs. tells me you know very little about your own needs. Frame choice, as well as bars and stem, depend on your anatomy and type of usage. Components must be compatible with your frame, with each other, and with your fitness level and terrain you deal with. Your needs and preferences will easily and likely change over a period of a few years. You may need various tools that will be used very seldom once the bike is built. Finally, the bragging value of a "unique" bike is overrated, especially when balanced against the time and money cost. It is much easier and no less useful to modify an existing new or used bike to meet your specific needs. One can always custom paint a bike without starting from scratch, for example. You are not even at the point of understanding all of the variables that need to be addressed.

Here's a recent thread on the subject that may help: Building your own bike but my best advice if you are close to Edinburgh or Aberdeen is to avail yourself of a bike co-op, where you can obtain in-person assistance with getting a bike to meet your needs.

I have a Ridley Aedon 605A

And a Bianchi Via Nirone 7



Both of which are great bikes, which I love using.


Thank you for the advice. All good stuff. As I say, I am new to cycling. Just taking my first tentative steps.


Think I will leave the building of a bike for now....you have gave me food for thought.


Cheers
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Old 01-17-18, 11:01 AM
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Nice bikes - I'm glad I gave you some things to think about. Here's another: You will be well served by making sure both of your bikes are properly fit to you - seat height AND fore-aft position, then reach, height, width of handlebars/stem, and a saddle that works well for you.

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Old 01-17-18, 11:08 AM
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Maybe the trendy low spoke count wheels, that come with new bikes, are not the best for a heavier rider..

get a set with 32 spoke front, 36 spoke rear, perhaps?

You can get a trade in value out of the dealer at point of sale, since they are new wheels,..
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Old 01-17-18, 11:45 AM
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.
...if you want a project idea that will both serve you well in learning about bicycles and the mechanics of them, and will improve one of your current bicycles in terms of durability and weight bearing for a heavier rider, see if you can find someone teaching wheel building.

Once you can build your own wheels, the bike world is your oyster.

You can learn it yourself from a book, but it usually takes more time and you'll make a few mistakes that will end up costing you money. But that's also pretty educational, and it's the way a lot of older guys here learned to do it.
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Old 01-17-18, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Maybe the trendy low spoke count wheels, that come with new bikes, are not the best for a heavier rider..

get a set with 32 spoke front, 36 spoke rear, perhaps?

You can get a trade in value out of the dealer at point of sale, since they are new wheels,..
+1.
I somehow missed the "trendy" wheels on those bikes. I would not recommend a long ride by a heavy rider on a bike with only 28 spokes in the rear. Such a wheel may technically be strong under normal conditions, but a high-stress incident with a heavy rider could be very damaging. Yes, I'm sure some have gotten away with it, but one incident can create a very large pain.
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Old 01-18-18, 04:04 AM
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The first thing to consider is what type of bike do you want. You already have two roadbikes do you want another?
Cross bike, mtn bike ,touring bike , weight weenie bike and then choices become clearer.
Decide which one , buy secondhand and from there build it too suit your self, if you like it. If you don't like it or something on it, change it.
No point digging a hole painting a bike before you are sure
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Old 01-18-18, 04:07 AM
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Great advice, again guys, thank you.


Was not concerned before re: the spokes. But, having read what you guys are saying and done a wee bit of research.....I am going to get new wheels for the Ridley and Bianchi. I want to go on longer rides this Summer, planning on doing a Glasgow - Edinburgh ride, which is near enough to 50 miles. Hate the thought of my wheel collapsing. That would, as you guys say, could be very damaging - to me.


I know I have a lot to learn.....


Cheers guys!


Ride on!
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Old 01-18-18, 07:24 PM
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I wouldn't be in a hurry to buy new wheels.
See if there are any spokes noticeably loose and that the wheels are true.
If they are good then you are fine. Regular inspection is all thats required after that.
Most important is tyres pumped, chain oiled,brakes function correctly, bike fit and gearing choices.
I would advise a junior cassette. Use the big chainring normally and drop to the small ring when required.
2019 World championships in Harrogate not to far from you. I am cycling over from Ireland and i can't wait. Like a kid at Christmas
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Old 01-19-18, 02:03 AM
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You seem to be keen on racy machines despite your size...

I've spent my life seeing what I can get away with, so I fancy myself a bit of an expert on stretching the envelope. I reckon you should be on no less than a 28 rear, 25 front, and 32 and 24 spokes. That's probably the minimum requirement for reliability for you. And IMO there's no reason you can't ride carbon; the stuff is strong as buggery. Just don't go too light.
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Old 01-19-18, 06:33 AM
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As you can see from the above post you are farthest off on what would be reliable with the rear wheels. The fronts should be fine.
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Old 01-19-18, 06:58 AM
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Get a Fat Tire Bike
You're not going anywhere fast, so might as well go in Style instead.
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