Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Does this spoke look weird?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Does this spoke look weird?

Old 08-21-18, 12:22 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
autonomy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Boston Roads
Posts: 975

Bikes: 2012 Canondale Synapse 105, 2017 REI Co-Op ADV 3.1

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 507 Post(s)
Liked 237 Times in 133 Posts
Does this spoke look weird?

I noticed an unusual bend in one of my spokes - see below. Some but not all of the spokes on that side of the wheel have a similar deflected profile, though not as pronounced. The other side, with the disc brake, looks more normal.
Is this indicative of a problem?

autonomy is offline  
Old 08-21-18, 01:24 PM
  #2  
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 13,852

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds. 2019 Giant Explore E+3

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1784 Post(s)
Liked 1,258 Times in 867 Posts
Pluck them and compare tone.
All the spokes on the same side should sound the same.
Disc side will be higher pitched.

A pic from the side may be useful because of depth perception issues with just one pic.

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 08-21-18 at 01:27 PM.
Bill Kapaun is online now  
Old 08-21-18, 01:26 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Tunnelrat81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,407
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One of the steps in the wheel building process is to push down on the elbow-out spokes so that they incorporate an appropriate bend around the flange before heading out to the rim. The person (or more likely, machine) that built your wheel skipped this part. The result is a generally less durable wheel as the tension in the spoke is not held as constant during use. You can do the job yourself by pushing aggressively on the spokes just above the flange until they take a tight curve past the flange and a direct line out toward the rim, but this is best done by someone familiar with wheel building or at the very least wheel truing. The process will reduce spoke tension on those elbow-out spokes and the wheel will need to be re-tensioned and trued after being properly aligned.

*edited to add* - This process of aligning the spokes is best done earlier in the wheel building process, so that there is less tension in the spokes and they are more easy to align properly. This job will be harder now that the spokes are under high tension.

-Jeremy
Tunnelrat81 is offline  
Old 08-21-18, 02:17 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6,660
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 582 Post(s)
Liked 171 Times in 138 Posts
If nothing has gotten between the spokes and fork I would guess that the spokes are not tensioned high enough.
davidad is offline  
Old 08-21-18, 09:37 PM
  #5  
Full Member
 
Le Mechanic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Denver Colorado
Posts: 339

Bikes: 2020 Pivot Vault, 1983 Rossin Record, Garneau R1, Mesamods home built gravel/rain commuter bike, 1995 Barracuda A2V modified with Surley single speed dropouts, 1969 Bottecchia junkyard special fixed gear, Cervelo P4, Mesamods 650b klunker

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 50 Posts
Kind of hard to tell from that photo, but that wheel doesn't look like it's built correctly. More photos from different angles would be helpful.
Le Mechanic is offline  
Old 08-22-18, 07:19 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sherwood, OR
Posts: 1,279
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 309 Times in 180 Posts
It appears to be laced correctly (more photos would help verify) but a I agree that the wasn't built properly. The spokes need to be better seated at the flange. The process will certainly require retensioning and truing, and it is probably better to do it now instead of waiting for spokes to break and needing a more expensive rebuild.

I would also also guess that either the tension is very low, or it will be after riding it. Nothing is worse for a spoke than riding at a tension so low that the spoke will go slack. I would get it looked at by a competent wheel builder ASAP. I will cost far less to do it now than after the wheel has failed.
aggiegrads is offline  
Old 08-22-18, 03:34 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Tunnelrat81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,407
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by aggiegrads
It appears to be laced correctly (more photos would help verify) but a I agree that the wasn't built properly. The spokes need to be better seated at the flange. The process will certainly require retensioning and truing, and it is probably better to do it now instead of waiting for spokes to break and needing a more expensive rebuild.

I would also also guess that either the tension is very low, or it will be after riding it. Nothing is worse for a spoke than riding at a tension so low that the spoke will go slack.
I would get it looked at by a competent wheel builder ASAP. I will cost far less to do it now than after the wheel has failed.
And don't assume that the random mechanic behind the counter at your local bike shop is a competent wheel builder. Wheel building is a knowledge/experience set that only the nerdiest of mechanics will take seriously. Lots of bike mechanics have built wheels...but not all of them have built them well.

-Jeremy
Tunnelrat81 is offline  
Old 08-22-18, 04:21 PM
  #8  
Full Member
 
streetstomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: The Open Road
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by Tunnelrat81
One of the steps in the wheel building process is to push down on the elbow-out spokes so that they incorporate an appropriate bend around the flange before heading out to the rim.
The technique I read, probably in a Bicycling article on wheelbuilding, was to use a Philips screwdriver. Put the shank just outside the radius of the hub flanges before the first cross, over an outer spoke and under an inner spoke. Gently lever it until the outer spoke lies flat. Repeat around the wheel.

Another part of the procedure in the same article was to use pliers to bend the spoke just above the nipple so the nipple comes out of the rim as straight as possible rather than some extreme angle and poorly supported by the holes, but I haven't seen that recommendation repeated many other places. Does anyone around here actually do this?

Last edited by streetstomper; 08-22-18 at 07:26 PM.
streetstomper is offline  
Old 08-22-18, 06:56 PM
  #9  
smelling the roses
 
seedsbelize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Posts: 15,320

Bikes: 79 Trek 930, 80 Trek 414, 84 Schwinn Letour Luxe (coupled), 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7081 Post(s)
Liked 901 Times in 612 Posts
I've never done it, but I might try that first part.
__________________
Originally Posted by Bah Humbug
Auto-pause is a honey-tongued devil whispering sweet lies in your ear.


seedsbelize is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
bajajoaquin
Bicycle Mechanics
12
11-11-18 10:05 PM
StevePGN10
Bicycle Mechanics
13
03-15-12 04:31 PM
Chris Chicago
Bicycle Mechanics
32
02-01-12 04:21 PM
serpico7
Bicycle Mechanics
10
06-17-11 03:41 PM
Olaf330
Bicycle Mechanics
22
05-28-10 11:12 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.