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A few road tubeless questions.

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A few road tubeless questions.

Old 09-15-18, 03:25 PM
  #1  
XXLHardrock
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A few road tubeless questions.

Iíd like to try my Gravelking SK 32mm mounted tubeless to some H+ Son Archetype rims.

The tires apparently are good to 55psi as long as they are on tubeless ready rims.

The Archetype arenít officially tubeless ready but according to what Iíve read on line, many have used them in tubeless setups.

My my questions are:

Would Stanís tape and valve stems be enough or should I use the Stem/ rim strip combo?

Im a big guy and with tubes, Iím running about 80 psi in the rear with some pretty good ďflatteningĒ of the tire, but no pinch flats.

Is 55psi a realistic pressure for this kind of weight?

Thanks.
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Old 09-16-18, 11:03 AM
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Bump.
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Old 09-16-18, 11:37 AM
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Don't know what to tell you about the PSI, except Pana says those tires 60 PSI max for tubeless. You didn't say how much you weigh.

Those rims look to be welded at the joint, double walled. I would use 2 layers of 21mm Stans tape and Stans valves.

I would mount the tires, and then wipe some Windex Original w/ammonia on the tire beads and tire rim and inflate to 60 PSI.
If they hold air good overnight or a couple of days, I would then deflate, add sealant through the valve and give it a go, see what happens.
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Old 09-24-18, 10:42 PM
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For the questions..

Tape and stems or the combo rim strip? Tape and stems, I could never get the combo rim strip to work well. Big bore stems make adding the sealant much easier.
I'm big, what PSI? I am ~250lb and run 70PSI on 32mm rear. 55 will cause the audible contact of the rim with the ground when I jump curbs.

I would use a wheel designed for tubeless and it wouldn't hurt to get one for clydes. Velocity Wheels - Hand Made in USA
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Old 09-25-18, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by pdoege View Post
For the questions..

Tape and stems or the combo rim strip? Tape and stems, I could never get the combo rim strip to work well. Big bore stems make adding the sealant much easier.
I'm big, what PSI? I am ~250lb and run 70PSI on 32mm rear. 55 will cause the audible contact of the rim with the ground when I jump curbs.

I would use a wheel designed for tubeless and it wouldn't hurt to get one for clydes. Velocity Wheels - Hand Made in USA
Sounds like you answered your own question - if you can't ride your existing tire/rim combo at 60 psi with a tube in it, then changing over to a 60 psi tubeless set-up will still be problematic. Tubeless may work better at lower pressures with bigger tires - or with a tubeless tire/rim/pressure combo that is intended for larger riders.

You could give your idea a try using your existing equipment, but I suggest that you don't go too fast until you are more certain that you won't experience a catastrophic blow-out.

Here is a related article from The Man (Jan Heine): https://janheine.wordpress.com/2017/...road-tubeless/




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Old 09-25-18, 05:02 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by pdoege View Post
Tape and stems or the combo rim strip? Tape and stems, I could never get the combo rim strip to work well.

This is interesting to me. I recently switched to a tubeless setup on one of my bikes, my first effort at this. The rear wheel sealed easily and loses no air. The front has given me fits. Tires are 700x35c Gravel King SK, and rims are tubeless ready WTBs in 700x25.


The air kept leaking from the valve stem, not through the stem itself, but at its interface with the rim. It's a type that uses two O-rings, and I set it up exactly the same as the rear wheel. When I could not get it to stop leaking, I removed the tire, cleaned and inspected everything again, replaced the rim tape with a different type, and put everything back together very carefully. Now it *seems* to be good, finally. (Crossing fingers!)


I had decided if it didn't work this time I was going to buy a different stem, and thought if I went to an integrated stem/rim strip, I'd be assured of non-leaky tubeless bliss. It's helpful to note that even those components don't always work perfectly.


For what it's worth, I used Gorilla Tape on the rear rim. Same thing on the front, initially. The front is now switched to Slime brand tape. In every case, I was careful to punch a neat round hole in the tape where the stem passes through. I'm using Stan's sealant, 2 to 4 ounces in each tire.


This process was so frustrating to me, I would have given up on it. But shortly after I got the rear set up, it was punctured by a big goat head thorn. I pulled the thorn out and there was immediately a rapid leak, but all it took to repair was a quick spin of the wheel. Within seconds, no more leaking from that hole. This makes all the initial hassle worth it. Added perks are lighter weight and ability to run low pressures, but for me these are secondary to the self sealing benefit.
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Old 09-26-18, 02:35 PM
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Hey Broctoon, I had the same problem so I took some "thumb gum" (that's the stuff electricians use to seal entrance holes etc. It's waterproof, cheap and does not dry out (at least much). I rolled a thin line of it, put it around the stem inside between the stem and tape. No more leaks.
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