Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Wheel Build Question:

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Wheel Build Question:

Old 10-18-18, 08:49 AM
  #1  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
Wheel Build Question:

So this off season I want to build a set of wheels, have always wanted to do this.
Upfront, I am will say I am 300 lbs., goes up and down but that would be heaviest. I ride a Spec. Allez with 11 speed Shimano.
Current wheels are a set of 36 spoke on 25mm tires.


On the front I am not so worried about spoke count, I have a bike with 28 and a 32 and neither have ever posed a issue truing or popping spokes.

Rear is a different animal I know. All my bikes have 36 spoke wheels on the rear. When I go to start looking at rims if I can go down to a 32 drillings the rim options are endless, but if I stick with 36 I am really limited to just a slim few. Can I build a 32 rear rim that will not cause havoc? I ride pavement 95% of the time and roads around here are not too bad.

Don't worry about being brutally honest either. I would rather just hear it and go from there. If I couldn't take it I shouldn't ask.

thanks.
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 08:54 AM
  #2  
Jason Curtiss
Senior Member
 
Jason Curtiss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 144

Bikes: Bianchi Intenso

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It "feels" like 32H rim would be capable of safely handling your load. I weigh 190 lbs and have a 24H rim that has seen some 2,000 miles without any problems whatsoever and I'm confident it could easily support 200+ pounds.

Best,
Jason
Jason Curtiss is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 09:21 AM
  #3  
reptilezs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: boston, ma
Posts: 2,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
what are you trying to achieve with your wheelset? durability and longevity? what does 32 offer you that 36 doesn't?
reptilezs is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 10:01 AM
  #4  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
Originally Posted by reptilezs View Post
what are you trying to achieve with your wheelset? durability and longevity? what does 32 offer you that 36 doesn't?
fair question:
36 wheel options are well UGLY...there are some really nice looking 32H options. Durability is always on the forefront I guess. My current wheels look terrible to be fair and hubs are just not great quality I don't think. I don't care much about the actual weight of the wheels because I am the heavy part of the bike.

So really its just to a point of vanity and better quality hubs.
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 10:02 AM
  #5  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
Originally Posted by Jason Curtiss View Post
It "feels" like 32H rim would be capable of safely handling your load. I weigh 190 lbs and have a 24H rim that has seen some 2,000 miles without any problems whatsoever and I'm confident it could easily support 200+ pounds.

Best,
Jason
Jason I think the same way but wanted to get some wheel expert opinions here.....thanks!
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 10:43 AM
  #6  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 13,612

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2438 Post(s)
Liked 498 Times in 386 Posts
Wheel life is not a black or white issue (excluding an incident like a pothole or curb impact). So when I read questions like "is a 32 spoke wheel going to hold up?" I say "sure but likely for less miles then a 36 spoke one, everything else being the same". Since things in life are generally "otherwise the same" the real life answers get even more shade of greys.

If this wheel is your first (or even third, fourth...) I would suggest siding on the more durable side of the fence. What you learn in building, riding and revisiting a self built wheel will likely make any future wheels last longer and make those future choices easier to judge. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 10:53 AM
  #7  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,602

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 64 Posts
Originally Posted by sdmc530 View Post
fair question:
36 wheel options are well UGLY...there are some really nice looking 32H options. Durability is always on the forefront I guess. My current wheels look terrible to be fair and hubs are just not great quality I don't think. I don't care much about the actual weight of the wheels because I am the heavy part of the bike.

So really its just to a point of vanity and better quality hubs.
Sounds like you are talking about ďfactory madeĒ wheel options with 36 spokes. Of course these are going to be utilitarian, and not sexy at all. In order to get exotic/36 spoke it sounds like youíre going to need to go custom. Not sure what colors you fancy or your budget but I would think if you could dream it up, a Pro wheelbuilder could build it for you.

Iím on a bit of a polished silver retro kick and my main road bike wheels are 32 front, 36 rear. My hubs are Dura Ace 7700, the rims are Velocity A23ís, polished. The build is DT Swiss (revolution I believe) light gauge front 2 cross, rear 3 cross with blue anodized aluminum spoke nipples. I weigh 195# now but have been over 250# in the past.

36 hole hubs by quality makers sometimes languish, un-loved, and therefore are offered at great clearance prices or on eBay. Just start looking around and youíll find them. Are you running an 11 speed cassette? If youíre running 10 speed or earlier, the deals are even better. Also, if you are still running 10 speed or earlier, may I suggest that you spec a 36 spoke Dura-Ace 7403 hybrid Uniglide/Hyperglide freehub? These are lifetime hubs. if you are patient you can pick up a clean used one on eBay cheap. If you have clearance for wider tires you could spec a wider rim such as the Velocity Quill or HED Belgium Plus. Maybe even elect to set it up tubeless.

If your budget allows and/or if you are running 11 speed cassettes, why not get a White Industries, Industry 9, Chris King, Hope or Phil Wood in the anodized color of your choice. At your weight, I would specifically look at the freehub offerings from Phil Wood. They look absolutely beautifully indestructible, albeit expensive.

I hope these suggestions can be of some assistance to you. There is no reason why you canít get a strong as hell, good looking rear wheel in 36 spoke that you you would not be embarrassed by, at all !
masi61 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 11:00 AM
  #8  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,427

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2294 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 705 Times in 491 Posts
I like Andrew's approach. I gather you have trued wheels but have you built one from scratch? A rear?

I have zero issues with different front and rear rims. Outside of vanity, peer pressure and that wheels often come as sets, there is no good reason to keep them the same. If I were you, I'd ride the 28 spoke rim I liked the looks of up front and a good reliable 36 spoker in back. (You never see that rear rim riding.)

With several wheels under your belt, you may well want to lighten things up on the rear wheel. 1) you'll be building better wheels. 2) you'll be enjoying building wheels so if that sexier rear doesn't last quite as long. you get to build another. Fun!

Keep riding! Keep building wheels! It's a good life.

Edit: A +1 for the last poster, especially for emphasizing build quality. Factory built 36 spoke wheels are quite likely to be mediocre builds and not serve someone of your weight well. (Often they can if the spokes are loosened then re-tightened as a proper build. Factory builds are often the cheapest way to get all the parts. I've purchased quality Shimano hubs laced to Open Pro rims at Performance for $100.) If you build you own, the first (one, two or three) may well be no better but soon your wheels will be a large step up in quality and durability. (And as you build and after, hang out here and at bikeshops to ask and learn more re: wheelbuilding. It's an art, but don't be intimidated, anyone can learn it and there is no one unique approach you have to take. You will talk to engineer/scientists with one approach and measure nothing artists with radically different approaches who all build super wheels that are a joy to ride and own. You can too.

Ben

Last edited by 79pmooney; 10-18-18 at 11:14 AM.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 11:15 AM
  #9  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 11,739

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1011 Post(s)
Liked 229 Times in 180 Posts
At 300 lbs, I'd definitely be using an offset rear rim for an 11 speed.
The additional width of the hub of 11 speed increases the dish, thus weakens the wheel. NDS spokes have marginal tension vs the DS ones.

As per spoke count- Do you ride or just look at them?
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 11:35 AM
  #10  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
So I just got back from my bike shop. I have a great shop and talking to them and they had a pretty good idea actually. Being I have 36 spoke rims, why not just disassemble what I have, purchase new "pretty" better hubs and re-build. They suggested I strip the rims and just re-decal them with something else or leave plain black. rims now are black with some ugly decals that I could remove. Nothing wrong with the rims in reality.

I do run 11 speed and budged would be let say under $600? If that seems reasonable for some "blingy" hubs...…

I need to think this over a bit more maybe, this does seem like a good idea maybe
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 11:41 AM
  #11  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
Originally Posted by masi61 View Post


Not sure what colors you fancy or your budget but I would think if you could dream it up, a Pro wheelbuilder could build it for you.


I like Phil and industry 9 hubs and I have thought of just doing this. I know its probably a bit more but its great option. I am looking for some red in my wheels.
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 11:44 AM
  #12  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,898

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1433 Post(s)
Liked 327 Times in 200 Posts
At 300 lbs. and first wheel build I'd be thinking Velocity Dyad rims and thirty six 13/15/14 spokes. The Dyad rims are on the heavier side but they are a little bit easier to tension and true.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 11:44 AM
  #13  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
As per spoke count- Do you ride or just look at them?
this made me laugh, because your correct. I really want to build a set but doesn't mean a person should. I have been playing with lacing and such so I feel confident but not experienced. I have help at my local shop of course they are great.
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 12:09 PM
  #14  
reptilezs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: boston, ma
Posts: 2,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
32 hole is suitable. i would pick spokes out wisely. leaning towards ones that has a 13g elbow. keep the rim weight on the heavy side. 500-600 gram. finally a good hub with a strong ratchet. make sure to service the ratchet to keep it clean and from clogging up.
reptilezs is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 12:10 PM
  #15  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 13,612

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2438 Post(s)
Liked 498 Times in 386 Posts
A few more comments-

As to reusing a rim make sure it's straight and round still. How? By loosening up the spokes on it's current build just enough to have the slightest flop at the rim. Then spin and look at the rim's shape as it passes by. Amy flat spots or lateral bends will be seen better without the spokes prodding the bad spots away. It is rare that I reuse a rim for anyone but those who I already know their riding nature and expectations, like myself

I will second the choice of Phil Wood hubs. I have them on 5 current bikes (including 2 tourers and a tandem) and have built many others for customers. Phils are one of the few hubs that are pretty much fool proof, every time. They are what I call a life time investment. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 12:27 PM
  #16  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,602

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 64 Posts
Originally Posted by sdmc530 View Post
I like Phil and industry 9 hubs and I have thought of just doing this. I know its probably a bit more but its great option. I am looking for some red in my wheels.
intersting thing I just observed: Phil Wood “classic” 11 speed freehub is listed as having a rider weight limit of #280 . Now, I would think that this rating might be conservative... the “pro” version has a weight limit of #190 , so that one could be crossed off the list...

Last edited by masi61; 10-18-18 at 12:35 PM.
masi61 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 12:41 PM
  #17  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,602

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 64 Posts
Another quick report back from some web searching... Industry 9 hubs are not listed in 36 hole drilling.

Are you running rim brakes or disc?

The Hope RS4 road rear hub is available in red anodized, 36 hole drilling, quick release 130 or 135mm spacing in steel or aluminum freehub body for $220.

Last edited by masi61; 10-18-18 at 12:46 PM.
masi61 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 12:53 PM
  #18  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,602

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 64 Posts
White Industries T11 rear freehub is available in red anodized and 36 hole. It has a titanium freehub body. It retails for $343.
masi61 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 01:12 PM
  #19  
OneIsAllYouNeed
Long-term wear tester
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seacoast, NH
Posts: 723

Bikes: Cycles Chinook travel/gravel/family tandem, KHS CX200 road/gravel, Voodoo Agwe fixie commuter, Gunnar Sport travel/road, Motobecane Boris fatbike

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 223 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 20 Times in 15 Posts
I'm assuming the bike has rim brakes and 130mm OLD rear hub. 130mm 11-speed hubs have a lot of offset. A truly durable wheel for a 300lb rider is going to require either and offset rim or a fairly deep rim. Rim depth and offset both help to balance out the left/right spoke tension, which reduces fatigue on the spokes, rim, and hub.

Just looking at offset 700c rims with a braking surface, the list is pretty short: Velocity A23, Kinlin XR31, Kinlin XR22, Kinlin XR26, Pacenti Forza. Those are all available in 32H, and half are available in 36H. You could also consider the non-offset DT Swiss R511, but not for a first build (nipple washer and proprietary nipples). For my money, I'd go with the Kinlin XR31 offset rim, either 32 or 36H.

White Industries T11 would probably be the best option (high flange, Ti freehub, steel axle all help with durability). For bonus points, it's available in 32 and 36H in red.

That leaves spokes. You can't go wrong with Sapim Force, Sapim CX Sprint, or DT Swiss Alpine III.

FWIW, I've been building and using a fair number or 32H rims and hubs on tandem wheels (in addition to 36H and 40H). The weights are pretty similar to the OP. The big difference with the tandem wheels is that the hubs are 148mm thru axle or 145mm QR, so the non-drive-side spokes can carry a fair bit of load.
OneIsAllYouNeed is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 01:15 PM
  #20  
MobiBike
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: PNW
Posts: 48

Bikes: 90's Norco Nitro, 90's Softride traveler, 90's Jamis Dakota, 84 Schwinn High Sierra,

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Riding style?

, 20 or 30 years ago when I was listening to certain engineers and studying this question as closely as I could the consensus was, that a 32 hole wheel was vertically as strong and in some cases stronger than a 36-hole depending on Cross pattern to keep it simple a 32 hole 3 cross is a strong as you can get vertically. If we're talkin the same rim for each example.

​​​​​​ where more spokes make more sense is when you have higher torsional loads side loads and that is where you will notice a performance and endurance enhancement. So if you are the type of rider that spends a lot of time out of saddle honking the bike back and forth... Go with more spokes. If you're gonna pull a trailer a single wheel type especially go with more spokes the more torque you put against the rim can make a difference as well so fat high pressure tire is a larger lever against the rim so aggressive riding would be better served with more spokes in that case too.

this is what they taught us years ago .. if engineering has changed over the years I didn't keep up. But back then we had to wait for our velocity rims from Australia so we had piles of them. And we proved that if somebody really really wants to destroy a wheel they're going to be able to do it no matter what it is.
MobiBike is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 01:33 PM
  #21  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,602

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 64 Posts
Checking the Chris King site - it appears you could also get their “Classic” hub with the specifications you want for about $500 + or - a few $.
masi61 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 01:44 PM
  #22  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,719

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 728 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 220 Posts
WOW this is great information, thank you all!

So sticking with 36H rear, the hope hub in red is BA! I am really liking that. Will check out the others yet, Phil stuff is cool cuz he has a great first name. King stuff is just too much I think and will stay away from that. I probably will not get cheap on the rims and just buy those new as well.

I really want red hubs...not a absolute but why not get what I want if I can.

FYI...rim breaks for me, I am active rider I would say and don't ride is abusive, but don't ride easy either. Front is a 100 and rear is 130 also.
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 02:08 PM
  #23  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,602

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 64 Posts
Originally Posted by sdmc530 View Post
WOW this is great information, thank you all!

So sticking with 36H rear, the hope hub in red is BA! I am really liking that. Will check out the others yet, Phil stuff is cool cuz he has a great first name. King stuff is just too much I think and will stay away from that. I probably will not get cheap on the rims and just buy those new as well.

I really want red hubs...not a absolute but why not get what I want if I can.

FYI...rim breaks for me, I am active rider I would say and don't ride is abusive, but don't ride easy either. Front is a 100 and rear is 130 also.
its fun to get stoked about a wheel build! The Hope brand I have heard is a great bargain. I purchased a press fit bottom bracket and separate installation tool from them. Quality looks good. Iíve also heard good things about their customer service. Iím using their aluminum seat collar on my titanium bike and been having a few problems with slippage. I canít tighten the alumininum bolt enough to keep the post from rotating. But it is not the fault of the Hope seat collar. From an aesthetic standpoint, Hope products do have a coolness factor to them. I canít remember which British bike mailorder has such great prices and selection of all things Hope branded. It might be Merlin or maybe Pro Bike Kit, Iíll check...
masi61 is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 02:18 PM
  #24  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,427

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2294 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 705 Times in 491 Posts
Before you rule out Phil Wood on the weight issue, call them. There may be a specific piece of the hub that is the limiting factor. Perhaps they could build you one with that modified to work for you. All of their stuff is machined by them and built like it is custom. True custom may not cost any more than the weight.

If you call them, you will talk to the engineer. Challenges are what they do, Now, what you are asking osn't far off the ordinary and I bet they have a quick answer and a good solution for you. They have been building hubs for 'round the world tourists for 1/2 a century. (I contacted them for a bottom bracket with a spindle as narrow as possible so I could set up my crankset to have the chainring just miss the right chainstay paint and have the overall width as narrow as possible to keep the Q-factor down for my knees. They told me they could run a custom BB with any spindle I wanted, I sent them the asymmetry and overall width I wanted. Engineer came back telling me what I asked for could be done within the adjustibility of their narrow stock symmetrical BB and that they had one in stock. Worked out perfect.

Another real plus for Phil Wood - if your needs (or the current standards) change, the odds are very good that Phil can supply you with parts to refit the hub to the new use. If the hub is in a wheel you like - the update is likely a lot cheaper than a new hub (and spokes? and rim?) Also probably far quicker and easier. I have a front hub I got as a standard quick-release hub. Later I put the very stiff Jahndd (sp) LowRider rack on the bike. The rack was so stiff it was a real fight to get a QR wheel out unless I unscrewed and removed the quick-release. (Not QR.) Phil sold me a new axle with bolts. Much, much better!

I only have 3 Phil hubs and that BB. I wish I had more and that I had started acquiring them 40 years ago, Would have saved me money and hassle. They'd all still be running.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 10-18-18, 02:24 PM
  #25  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,427

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2294 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 705 Times in 491 Posts
Originally Posted by sdmc530 View Post
...

FYI...rim breaks for me, I am active rider I would say and don't ride is abusive, but don't ride easy either. Front is a 100 and rear is 130 also.
No! You absolutely do not want rim breaks! Now, I have no issues with caliper brakes, also known as rim brakes, but stay away from those breaks! They can lead to real pain. (You break a twig; you brake a train.) Sorry, this is a pet peeve of mine.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.