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Essential Tools

Old 12-05-19, 07:17 AM
  #1  
SkullHead
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Essential Tools

I'm putting together my tools about $12 to $20 a tool right now and it seems like there are hundreds to go. I created this thread hoping you guys could tell me what tools you would buy like this to get all the essentials covered. This started by buying a bike that came with very poor tools and to build it I had to buy better Allen wrenches so I bought a couple park tool allen wrenches, the kind that have 3 sizes and fit in your palm, I need to get longer stem ones... I also purchased a pedal wrench sorry I don't have the park tool numbers in front of me. I want to work on everything. Thank you guys for the help and support.
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Old 12-05-19, 08:10 AM
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Don't buy random one-of -everything tools until you know 1) what jobs you really want to do and 2) what your specific bike(s) need. Obviously a good quality set of Allen keys is essential as is a good floor pump and tire levers. Beyond, that buy what you need as you need it.

Eg. don't buy a square taper crank puller if you have a HTII crank, don't buy a Shimano cartridge bottom bracket tool if you have their HTII bottom bracket, etc.
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Old 12-05-19, 08:28 AM
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If there's a bike co-op in your area, use their tools for a while and see what you'd like to have at home. And learn the skills to use the tools.

A set of T-handle Allen wrenches with ball end would be nice. You've already found the limits of the triple Allens, it sounds like.

If you plan on servicing cup-and-cone hubs, you'll need some cone wrenches. A set of 8 to 17 mm combination wrenches is a must. Chain break too. Cable cutter.

A parts tray like a small cake pan is nice. So is a magnetic parts dish. A dog dish is nice for washing small parts. Be sure your shop area has safe oily rag disposal.

DItto the above, get the specific bottom bracket and cassette tools for the bike(s) you and your family have.
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Old 12-05-19, 08:36 AM
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Here's a list I put together for my mechanics class



-->Tool list



General tools

Allen wrenches (in mm)
  • 4, 5, 6 most common
  • 8, 3, 2.5 useful to have
  • Torx

T25 most useful

Metric combination wrenchs (box end/open end)
  • 15mm most useful
  • 8 to 17mm handy to have

Large adjustable wrench
  • 12” or larger

Soft headed hammer
  • Not a rubber hammer

Screwdriver
  • Phillips. JIS standard works better for most bicycle applications
  • Flat

Side cut wire cutters

Hacksaw

Needle nose wire cutters
  • Park has a good pair with a built in crimper for cable ends



Bike specific tools

Pedal wrench
  • 15mm combination will work in a pinch
  • 8mm Allen wrench may be needed for some pedals

Chain tool
  • Should be able to handle the chain you use.
  • 9 speed chain tools may not be able to be used on 11speed chains

Chainwear checking tool.

Master link pliers

Chain whip

Lock ring tool or freewheel tool

Cone wrenches
  • 17, 15, 14, 13 mm
  • 17mm combination will work on lock nuts

Cable cutter
  • A good heavy one

Bottom bracket tools
  • There are several. Get the one that matches your bottom bracket

Spoke wrench
  • Combination ones that fit 3 different spoke widths work well for limited home use

Headset tools
  • There are several. Match your headset
  • May be as little as a 5mm allen wrench.

Tire levers



Bike specific tools that are nice to have but not absolutely necessary

Repair stand
  • PCS 10 is good
  • PSC-4-1 is better but more expensive
  • PRS-3.2-1 is the best but it’s very expensive and needs an additional expensive base. You’ll be giving it to your great-great-great grandchildren, however.

Truing stand
  • Sunlite makes a foldable one that works well ($50)

Torque wrench and allen bits to fit

Park Adjustable Torque driver
  • Necessary if you have carbon parts



Bike specific tools that are handy but you’ll probably never use

Headset press

Crown removal tool

Crown press

Derailer hanger alignment tool

Fork cutting guide

Star nut setting tool

Dishing gauge



Bike specific tools even Idon’t have

Facing tools

Frame alignment tools

Bottom bracket threading/facing tools



The last ones are highly expensive (~$500 each) and have limited use.
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Old 12-05-19, 08:37 AM
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The Park (Feedback Sports also make a nice version) 3 way hex wrench (Allen is a brand) are a very good tool to begin with, most basic adjustment on a bike can be done with one of these, and a flat blade screwdriver and a JIS screwdriver (for Shimano RD's).

After that, would look at the tools your bike needs, avoid buying a 'bike' tool kit, as these are often only useful for older bikes with headsets and non-external type BB's.

No need to buy bike-specific tools for the basics, as there are plenty of good industrial tools around which are cheaper and do exactly the same job.
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Old 12-05-19, 08:51 AM
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I like hex L-wrenches with a ball end on the long leg and a straight end on the short one; you can use the straight end for higher-torque uses as they are less likely to strip out the drive recess than the ball ends. They are also small and light for carrying on the bike.
Get good ones and understand that they are a wear item and should be replaced when they get rounded off, although the straight ends can be ground back to fresh, sharp corners.
I would also suggest a good cable cutting too; the Park ones are OK but the very best are from FELCO, they are costly (but not insanely so) but your grandchildren will be able to use them. My 40+ year old FELCO cutters are as good as the day I bought them.
Invest in good-quality tools, although I buy Harbor Freight ones when I need to customize them such as by grinding, etc. The HF "click" torque wrenches have worked well for me although some folks have gotten duds they click in both directions (not all do), useful for bottom bracket installation.. I put a bar clamp across the bottom bracket, tool and torque wrench to hold the tool onto the BB, lets me use both hands for the wrench and frame.
Multi-tools suck in my opinion; they are bulky and they have a lot of tools which do a mediocre job Try installing a water bottle cage with one and you will see what I mean.
Many derailleur limit screws work better with JIS screwdrivers than Phillips.
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Old 12-05-19, 10:37 AM
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A basic set of metric wrenches will take you a long way. Also a high-end cable cutter is nice to have. After that just buy tools as needed
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Old 12-05-19, 11:05 AM
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One tool missing from the list(s) above is a dental pick (Or a spoke sharpened to a point). I find these useful for a variety of jobs.
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Old 12-05-19, 12:35 PM
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All good. cycocommute's list is awesome.

He lists a needle-nose wire cutter. If this is a needle-nosed plier with a wire cutter I agree. Very nice to have, Also standard pliers are nice for grabbing the end of a brake or derailleur cable.

For some things, it's useful to have a micrometer. 0-1 inch, or 0-25mm. Digital versions have the advantage of doing both. I use snooty high end stuff (Starrett) cuz I'm a machinist wannabe, and there's other great high end products (Mitutoyo is probably the standard now) but you can get a digital electronic version from Harbor Freight for $35. Or buy an old analog Starrett mechanical version of ebay perhaps for less.

A digital caliper can also be useful. A 0-6" should be fine. Measure BB widths and dropout spacings.
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Old 12-05-19, 01:05 PM
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10mm, 11mm, 12mm hex keys for freehub body removal.

"Third hand" and "fourth hand" tools.

Chuck wedges and pickle fork.

"Drag link" adjuster to rebuild freehub bodies.

Propane or acetylene torch.

Dremel tool or die grinder, with bits.

Power drill & bits - left and right hand.

Screw extractors.

Axle vice.

Regular vice with soft jaw faces.

Various spoke wrenches and a nipple driver.

Spoke tension gauge.

Tap and die set.

Illuminated magnifier.

Vice grip pliers, several types.

Tub o' grease*.

Various wire brushes.

Shop apron, safety goggles and butyl gloves.

A broken spoke, sharpened to a fine point.

Strips of rubber cut from an old inner tube.
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Old 12-05-19, 01:32 PM
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.
...just as an FYI, you can buy a standard BB tap set now that is made somewhere in Asia for pretty cheap. I don't know the quality, but Chinese tools have come a long way in my lifetime. They don't appear to have much in the way of taper, so probably just best used for cleanup (the most common use for these.)There's a Cyclus option from Europe that's in the $100 range, but the shipping will kill you. Most people don't need these. I use them sometimes, but I already have them.
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Old 12-05-19, 01:55 PM
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A bottle of bourbon is nice, a six pack of beer if on a budget. LOL!
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Old 12-05-19, 02:09 PM
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Old 12-05-19, 02:35 PM
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I would say you’re off to a good start. A really good set of Allen wrenches ( and depending on how much you use them these need to be replaced as they wear down ), a set of metric box wrenches from about 6mm-18mm, and set of tire levers is a good starting kit.

Also, I haven’t seen this mentioned yet, if your bike has any kind of carbon fiber in it invest in a really good toque wrench and spend some time learning how to use it. All modern CF parts have torque limits to attach them to the bike. Make this a priority for your early tools goals if you have a high end bike.
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Old 12-05-19, 02:40 PM
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I also like a decent stick magnet for getting hub bearings out, especially if they get inside and trapped in the grease.
If your work area has less than ideal lighting a headlamp is nice too.
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Old 12-05-19, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by SkullHead View Post
I want to work on everything.
You sure about that? Two words: "cottered cranks."
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Old 12-05-19, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by kingsting View Post
One tool missing from the list(s) above is a dental pick (Or a spoke sharpened to a point). I find these useful for a variety of jobs.
We call them "pokey tools" at my local co-op. The actual label on the bench says "Pokey tools. For poking stuff". We use old quick release skewers (just the shaft) and sharpen them to a point on a grinder. We use spokes with a triangle bent into the end and sharpen those. The little pokey tools are more useful than the larger ones.

I also carry around a short version in my shirt pocket all the time. It comes in handy as a pointer.
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Old 12-05-19, 03:40 PM
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bench vise
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Old 12-05-19, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by WizardOfBoz View Post
All good. cycocommute's list is awesome.

He lists a needle-nose wire cutter. If this is a needle-nosed plier with a wire cutter I agree. Very nice to have, Also standard pliers are nice for grabbing the end of a brake or derailleur cable.

For some things, it's useful to have a micrometer. 0-1 inch, or 0-25mm. Digital versions have the advantage of doing both. I use snooty high end stuff (Starrett) cuz I'm a machinist wannabe, and there's other great high end products (Mitutoyo is probably the standard now) but you can get a digital electronic version from Harbor Freight for $35. Or buy an old analog Starrett mechanical version of ebay perhaps for less.

A digital caliper can also be useful. A 0-6" should be fine. Measure BB widths and dropout spacings.
The needle nose pliers I like are the Park NP-6. Not for their cutting capability but because they are useful for pulling on cables (and other things) and they are the best cable end crimper I've ever found.

A caliper is nice to have and use but I've never used a micrometer in 40 years of mechanicing.
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Old 12-05-19, 09:32 PM
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Some good sale prices here https://blueskycycling.com/collections/tools
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Old 12-05-19, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
We call them "pokey tools" at my local co-op. The actual label on the bench says "Pokey tools. For poking stuff". We use old quick release skewers (just the shaft) and sharpen them to a point on a grinder. We use spokes with a triangle bent into the end and sharpen those. The little pokey tools are more useful than the larger ones.

I also carry around a short version in my shirt pocket all the time. It comes in handy as a pointer.
Yup. Pokey Tool is the universal name in Portland. The sharpened spoke is perfect for cleaning up cable housing after cutting.

Oh, another tool you'll use: a file. I square off the cable housing with the file then use the Pokey Tool.

Ben
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Old 12-05-19, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
.
...just as an FYI, you can buy a standard BB tap set now that is made somewhere in Asia for pretty cheap. I don't know the quality, but Chinese tools have come a long way in my lifetime. They don't appear to have much in the way of taper, so probably just best used for cleanup (the most common use for these.)There's a Cyclus option from Europe that's in the $100 range, but the shipping will kill you. Most people don't need these. I use them sometimes, but I already have them.
Holy keyword description! The translations are pretty interesting too.
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Old 12-06-19, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by WizardOfBoz View Post
...A digital caliper can also be useful. A 0-6" should be fine. Measure BB widths and dropout spacings.
I have a long-reach caliper from Harbor Freight which is nice for reaching around stuff like hubs and cassettes: https://www.harborfreight.com/6-in-l...per-63714.html
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Old 12-06-19, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
I have a long-reach caliper from Harbor Freight which is nice for reaching around stuff like hubs and cassettes: https://www.harborfreight.com/6-in-l...per-63714.html
Excellent idea! I'm going to find one on the way home tonight!
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Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
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Old 12-06-19, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
bench vise
Ah, for that you need a bench, too. This list is getting big!
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