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Favorite multi-tool?

Old 06-12-21, 02:01 PM
  #1  
MrWasabi 
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Favorite multi-tool?

What's everyone's favorite multi-tool to carry when riding? I've been eyeballing the Pedro's Micro-20 but don't think I need all the tools on it for my purposes. Plus I already have a separate set of Pedro's levers. Just looking for something that won't take up much space in my saddle bag but still give me the main tools I'd probably need for basic trail side repairs.

Thanks for any input.
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Old 06-12-21, 03:04 PM
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None. I carry a small screw driver with a changeable point, a flat, philips and a couple torx points for it and a couple of allen keys.

Your favorite things to carry should be things you can work with. If that's a multi tool, I'm okay with that. I just never grew to like them. Not even the famous swiss army knife.
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Old 06-12-21, 05:31 PM
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The Park MT-1 "dog bone" tool is my favorite. It's very small, light, inexpensive and has the essential tools: 3,4,5,6,8mm hex keys, 8,9,10mm box wrenches and a small screwdriver. The allen keys are arranged for good leverage which isn't always the case with multi-tools. It, a small chain tool and tire levers have covered all of my roadside needs.
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Old 06-12-21, 06:01 PM
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Crank brothers M19
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Old 06-12-21, 06:05 PM
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You've probably read this before (and you probably don't want to hear it if your mind is set on a multi-tool), but I have found that carrying the few individual tools I need works out much better than lugging around a heavy multi-tool with a bunch of components that don't work well and/or aren't needed for my bike. The chain tool component of most multi-tools is usually not very good and nor are the tire levers. For me, having all those Allen wrenches attached to a fat handle makes them really hard to maneuver in tight spaces on the bike.

I carry a small chain tool, small Phillips and flat screwdrivers, a tire lever, and just the (loose) Allen wrenches I need.
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Old 06-12-21, 06:14 PM
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Thanks for the replies everyone,

This is the advice I need...from experienced riders. My mind isn't set on a multi tool and I'd actually prefer separate tools but was worried about space. Hopefully I won't need either. I like the small multi-tip screwdriver idea along with my flat tools/kit. I guess I need to figure out the sizes for torx tips and allen wrenches I need. If I need any more serious repairs, I'm calling for a ride.
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Old 06-12-21, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
The Park MT-1 "dog bone" tool is my favorite. It's very small, light, inexpensive and has the essential tools: 3,4,5,6,8mm hex keys, 8,9,10mm box wrenches and a small screwdriver. The allen keys are arranged for good leverage which isn't always the case with multi-tools. It, a small chain tool and tire levers have covered all of my roadside needs.
+1 on the Park. Figure out what you are likely to need. I have never needed a chain tool. Good luck!
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Old 06-12-21, 07:25 PM
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Crank Brothers M10 is my daily carry and has long hex keys which are quite handy. The Spurcycle Tool is nice and a really solid tool to use but it is deficient in the fact it uses small bits. I haven't lost any yet but I could see someone loosing one in the heat of the moment.

Having a lot of tools is cool but I want the common tools to be easy to use. There are plenty of options for smaller chain tools and such should I need one and I can find other multi tools that maybe aren't hex related with them on them.
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Old 06-12-21, 07:29 PM
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SKS Tom-7
Actually has more than I need as on the road, I've used only one of its tools and that was a couple years ago.
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Old 06-12-21, 09:08 PM
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1 tire iron and a Lezyne Storage Drive
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Old 06-12-21, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by MrWasabi View Post
Thanks for the replies everyone,

This is the advice I need...from experienced riders. My mind isn't set on a multi tool and I'd actually prefer separate tools but was worried about space. Hopefully I won't need either. I like the small multi-tip screwdriver idea along with my flat tools/kit. I guess I need to figure out the sizes for torx tips and allen wrenches I need. If I need any more serious repairs, I'm calling for a ride.
I hate most multitools. I find them both clunky and chunky. They generally donít fit the hand very well and are difficult to get at the right angle for really using them. I currently like Fix-it-Sticks, either the Mountain kit or the Commuter kit. They work better, feel better and are a bit more compact.
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Old 06-12-21, 10:53 PM
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I don't experience a ton of mechanicals typically so honestly my multi tool doesn't get a ton of use, but I had a Crankbrothers M19 that did my solid for many years. Now I have a Park IB-3 and I like it pretty well. If I were touring or doing long gravel/endurance mtb rides where I more regularly needed a tool I'd probably look at different options.
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Old 06-13-21, 12:50 AM
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Hero Kit multitool, the flattest, most compact I've found that includes a chain tool (which I've used a couple of times for friends on group rides) and fits the minimalist Lezyne Road Caddy seat bag on my lightest carbon fiber bikes.

Spin Doctor Rescue 16 multitool, same tools as the Hero Kit, perhaps slightly better made, but not nearly as flat and compact. It goes in the Serfas wedge bag on my steel bike.
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Old 06-13-21, 02:16 AM
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The attraction to a MUT for me is the implied expectation that the tools will be self contained, easy to stow, be useful for 90% of roadside repairs, & not be a maraca while riding.
Unfortunately, there has been a lot of false hope for meeting those expectations & the solution is to acquire the tools YOUR bicycle may need ņ La Cart & derive a stowage solution to easily contain them. That has been what I've been doing for every bicycle I've ever owned, stemming from my experiences from my early-on adolescent time.
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Old 06-13-21, 02:26 AM
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Anything without a chainbreaker, thousands of kilometers in multiple countries and never needed one. Just basic sccrewdrivers allen and torx, with longer ones being better than short. Also reasonably stiff folding, floppy tools suck.
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Old 06-13-21, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Trevtassie View Post
Anything without a chainbreaker, thousands of kilometers in multiple countries and never needed one.
I've never needed one for myself but I've used the one I carry to bail out other riders a few times. My Ritchey CT-5 chaintool is very small and weighs only 30 grams and uses the 5mm allen key on my Park MT-1 to turn the drive screw. It certainly wouldn't hold up to routine use but as an emergency tool it's been very useful.
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Old 06-13-21, 07:42 AM
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In the "serious" bike kit, I keep my first generation Crank Bros. M17 (and yes, I have used it and its chain tool throughout its life), in the fixed wheel's bike kit I keep separate tools (DIY combo tire levers with 14/15mm boxed spanners). As an EDC, it can be a Victorinox Swisstool Spirit, a Leatherman Rebar, PST II, or Wave; or a Gerber MP600.

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Old 06-13-21, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Papa Tom View Post
You've probably read this before (and you probably don't want to hear it if your mind is set on a multi-tool), but I have found that carrying the few individual tools I need works out much better than lugging around a heavy multi-tool with a bunch of components that don't work well and/or aren't needed for my bike. The chain tool component of most multi-tools is usually not very good and nor are the tire levers. For me, having all those Allen wrenches attached to a fat handle makes them really hard to maneuver in tight spaces on the bike.

I carry a small chain tool, small Phillips and flat screwdrivers, a tire lever, and just the (loose) Allen wrenches I need.
Papa Tom took the words right out of my mouth. Multi-Tools suck. Try installing a bottle cage with a multitool and you will see what we mean. I carry a small screwdriver and the few hex L-wrenches I need a Park Mini Chain Brute, a Rema patch kit and a couple of tire levers. rolled up into a towel to keep them quiet and to wipe my hands and face. The Park MT-1 is kind of OK but some of the hex drivers are at inconvenient angles, for me.
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Old 06-13-21, 08:36 AM
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In the past several years the tool that I've wished I had with me was a needle nose pliers. I've encountered a few punctures that were caused by radial ply tire wires. Those little devils hiding in your tire can be hard to find and, even once found, can be the devil to root out.

In kind of a reverse Murphy's Law thing, I haven't had a radial wire puncture since I started carrying a tiny needle nose.
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Old 06-13-21, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
. Multi-Tools suck. Try installing a bottle cage with a multitool and you will see what we mean.
I can't imagine needing to have to install bottle cages on my ride; if I did, I suppose the bike shop where I picked one up would lend me one or actually maybe install it for me. Multi-tool works fine for how I'd imagine (and just imagine mind you; haven't had a need) requirements to futz with usual 98% suspects such as seatpost collar, saddle, limiter screws, stem bolts, brake caliper bolts.
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Old 06-13-21, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
In the past several years the tool that I've wished I had with me was a needle nose pliers. I've encountered a few punctures that were caused by radial ply tire wires. Those little devils hiding in your tire can be hard to find and, even once found, can be the devil to root out.

In kind of a reverse Murphy's Law thing, I haven't had a radial wire puncture since I started carrying a tiny needle nose.
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Old 06-13-21, 10:20 AM
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PB Swiss 470 Bike Tool. Goes with me on every ride.

I have a number of fine mutli-tools (some expensive); however, the only one, the only one that can function as good as a regular tool is the PB Swiss Bike Tool (made in Switzerland). The handle's side is also a full-functioning tire lever. Not cheap but the best I have found and I have Park, Lezyne, Pedro, Crankbrothers, etc.

Amazon has them sometimes. Their US distributor has them too: https://www.shop.pbtools.us/

This is the PB Swiss. Come in a rainbow of different colors too:





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Old 06-13-21, 11:17 AM
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Here is a photo of my kit. Every part is my ideal tool in terms of usability. The Schwalbe tire levers are slim but strong. The Wera bit ratchet is rated for 40N-m, so it is strong enough for any fastener I will put it on, including the 8mm bit for pedals. The chain tool is an add-on for a fixit sticks kit which uses the bit extension as a stabilizer and the but ratchet as a handle. The red thing is a valve cap that doubles as a valve core remover. Kit includes a spare valve core, quick link, and valve extender.

the bits are 2.5mm through 8mm, t25, t27, JIS bit, small flat head, and a 1/4” square drive. The main part of the kit is exactly 250g, and the bottom row adds another 150g.

The bottom row is added to my kit for rides where I am out in the sticks and need to be more self-sufficient, but comes along most of the time anyway if I am not concerned about weight. The Knipex have removed radial wire that would have been impossible to remove with fingers. It will also remove 15mm axle nuts and pedals. It would also remove a stubborn presta nut or hold a valve body to remove a valve core that has been cemented on with dried sealant.




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Old 06-13-21, 06:28 PM
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Old 06-14-21, 01:18 AM
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