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road hub differences

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Old 04-27-08, 09:56 AM
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cohophysh
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road hub differences

Is there truly a huge difference in road hubs. Maybe with the exception of weight and sealed bearings, is there really a difference between shimano low end 2200 and the higher end ultegra dura ace? If so, what are the significant differences?
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Old 04-27-08, 10:04 AM
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Weight
Bearing quality
Machining tolerances
Hole pattern options
10-speed compatibility
Freehub quality
Cost
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Old 04-27-08, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by cohophysh View Post
is there really a difference between shimano low end 2200 and the higher end ultegra dura ace?
The biggest difference that I can see is the better quality Shimano hubs have better quality sealing systems. The more expensive hubs are also finished more nicely.

The listed weight difference between an Ultegra and 105 fromt hub is 7 grams. That's not very much.
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Old 04-27-08, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
The biggest difference that I can see is the better quality Shimano hubs have better quality sealing systems. The more expensive hubs are also finished more nicely.

The listed weight difference between an Ultegra and 105 fromt hub is 7 grams. That's not very much.
That's been my experience with hubs of all sorts, not just road hubs.

I've had Alivio MTB hubs and up to XT hubs. In road stuff I've got a no name and up to an old Ultegra I got used. Now all these are cup and cone deals and when set up with a fine touch on the preload they all spin really nicely. The only other place I've noticed a difference is the freehub pawls. When you jump to some point in the lineups the freehubs seem to run a little more smoothly. It may be just my samples or it could be that the upper end freehubs are made differently other than just the seals as mentioned.

For this reason I've always gone with good solid mid to mid-upper components where you get a really nice bang for the buck and they are finished to a nice degree without that last bit of attention that can add significantly to the cost.

But having said that it's nice to have the better looking parts with the nicer outer machining and finish. It shames us into riding fast/well enough to do justice to the parts we have...
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Old 04-27-08, 10:35 AM
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Between 105 and Ultegra:

The 105 has noisy pawls (not very noisy, but they can be heard) whereas the Ultegra is silent...at least mine are like this. Ultegra is lighter, noticeably, but not by much, and look way nicer, too.
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Old 04-27-08, 11:10 AM
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Thanks for the response. Here is why I ask, I am interested in these
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...TODAY.m238.lVI
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Old 04-27-08, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by cohophysh View Post
Thanks for the response. Here is why I ask, I am interested in these
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...TODAY.m238.lVI
I've used wheels with Shimano 2200 hubs, the hubs performed just fine. The problem with wheelsets like the one you linked to is that the wheels are generally cheaply built by machine and will be out of true and not tensioned properly right out of the box. Also, they usually don't use name-brand spokes, and from my experience the cheap spokes are more prone to break.

In fact, the wheels I had with the Shimano 2200 hubs were inexpensive mail-order wheels similar to those in your link. I re-tensioned and trued the wheels as soon as I got them, rode them for a few thousand miles and then had spokes begin to break. About the same time, I hit a pothole and bent the rear rim. At that point, I retired the wheels. But really, during the life of those wheels, the part of the wheels that I had no complaints about were the Shimano 2200 hubs-

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Old 04-27-08, 02:33 PM
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Weight
Bearing quality
Machining tolerances
Hole pattern options
10-speed compatibility
Freehub quality
Cost
Why would anyone be concerned about these factors,This isnt about gas mileage and more money in the tank.I mean it would mean that your legs would have to get stronger and eating a few more hot dogs.
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Old 04-27-08, 05:44 PM
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I love your avitar. Ravens brew is my favorite coffee. The best is the three peckered billy goat!
back to the subject, i've run 2200 hubs. they are fine for most uses, and work with 10 speed cassettes. very good value.
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Old 04-27-08, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by well biked View Post
I've used wheels with Shimano 2200 hubs, the hubs performed just fine. The problem with wheelsets like the one you linked to is that the wheels are generally cheaply built by machine and will be out of true and not tensioned properly right out of the box. Also, they usually don't use name-brand spokes, and from my experience the cheap spokes are more prone to break.

In fact, the wheels I had with the Shimano 2200 hubs were inexpensive mail-order wheels similar to those in your link. I re-tensioned and trued the wheels as soon as I got them, rode them for a few thousand miles and then had spokes begin to break. About the same time, I hit a pothole and bent the rear rim. At that point, I retired the wheels. But really, during the life of those wheels, the part of the wheels that I had no complaints about were the Shimano 2200 hubs-
Thanks for your input. These are handbuilt with 2.0 mm spokes so they appear to be well built.
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Old 04-27-08, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by mark9950 View Post
Why would anyone be concerned about these factors,This isnt about gas mileage and more money in the tank.I mean it would mean that your legs would have to get stronger and eating a few more hot dogs.
The OP asked what the differences were, not justifications for spending more or less.
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Old 04-27-08, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by cohophysh View Post
Thanks for your input. These are handbuilt with 2.0 mm spokes so they appear to be well built.
A word of warning: it seems that almost all mail order wheelsets are described as "hand built." My experience regarding super low price deals on wheelsets is that if they are actually hand built, they're hand built by someone who either doesn't have time or doesn't know how to properly tension and true wheels (or both). So just be prepared to tension and true the wheels right out of the box. At that price, I can almost guarantee you the wheels will need some work.

In regard to the 2.0 stainless steel spokes in the description, they are almost certainly not brand name spokes. Again, my experience has been that they don't hold up as well as DT's or Wheelsmith's. But maybe you'll have better luck.

The least of your worries in a deal like this are the Shimano 2200 hubs.

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Old 04-27-08, 09:58 PM
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Even considering weight and bearing quality, there won't be a significant performance difference from 2200 to Dura Ace.

The 2200, Sora and Tiagra hubs are all very rudimentary. Very little cosmetic finishing and no sealing or shielding of the bearings at all. Grease will be ooze out around the cones, though this is not a problem at all, the oozed out grease offers some protection from water and dirt.

105 hubs have labrynth seals which are part of the cone assemblies. They also have internal seals to keep grease from going into the hollow middle part of the hub. Ultegra hubs are the same with better cones and races.

Dura Ace hubs use oversized axels, use 3/16 inch stainless steel bearings front and rear, have a titanium freehub body with more ratchet points and are made from better aluminum. Also, the non-lever side of the skewers are polished aluminum with a steel insert, instead of plastic with an insert on the lower groups. Which is why I only use dura ace hubs. Even on crappy bikes. I'd never want to be accused of using crappy skewers.
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Old 04-28-08, 02:18 PM
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The lower end freehubs will use only 2 pawl engagement for their freehub bodies. I took apart a Shimano Exage body used for a MTB wheel. I discovered there is a spot for a 3rd pawl, but it wasn't machined and a pawl was left out. The spacing is triangular and equally spaced. So, the 2 pawls that were used, aren't equally spaced apart.

I assume the Ultegra/D-A/Deore XT/XTR freehub bodies have more pawls. Has anyone disassembled one to verify this?

The major difference is the level of finish and quality of the cups and cones in the hubs. Everything else is basically cosmetic and weight shaving. It's only when you reach race spec XTR and D-A hubs where strength to weight performance becomes priority and its cost isn't.

I believe the wheels you're planning to buy will be fine and the 2200 hubs will perform well. I agree with the comments above that you better inspect these wheels and hand true them before use. Also, check the hubs for smoothness, adjust the cones if necessary. I find hubs to be shipped too tight.
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