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Replacing The Chain Rivet...

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Replacing The Chain Rivet...

Old 06-30-08, 06:49 PM
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Gunmetal_Ghoul
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Replacing The Chain Rivet...

Darn, I took the chain rivet out completely and I can't get it back in. How can I use my chain tool to get the rivet back in through the rollers?
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Old 06-30-08, 07:45 PM
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What make and model is the chain? Shimano, SRAM and most other 8, 9 or 10-speed chains should not have a rivet reinstalled even if it wasn't pushed all the way out. It will make a weak spot and a highly likely failure location.

If it's a Shimano chain, you can get a special replacement pin in the right width at any bike shop. If it's a SRAM, get another Powerlink.
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Old 06-30-08, 07:56 PM
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I have a spare masterlink lying around if that's what you're talking about, but I have been thinking that it's about time to get a new chain. The debate comes because I only had the bike since October and I have a stiff link that gets very irritating. I should just get a new chain and be done with it....

Last edited by Gunmetal_Ghoul; 06-30-08 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 06-30-08, 08:07 PM
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Next time, DON'T PUSH THE PIN ALL THE WAY OUT! Yer suppose to push it just far enuff to unlink but leave the pin still on the outer plate.

Lesson#2 - once u got it back in, wiggle with your fingers and the links should bend ezly. If not u gotta push the pin back and forth a little until the links don't stick.
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Old 06-30-08, 08:22 PM
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Can't put rivets back in with a chain tool. It is definitely true that you never want to squeeze the rivet out completely. I myself learned this the hard way.

Contrary to what most people say, it is actually possible to get the rivet back in. In my experience, there is not much damage to the chain.

Find an anvil or solid steel surface; not even concrete will have the right restitution properties. Put the pieces together the way it would be normally, except of course for the rivet. If your fingers are small enough, hold the rivet upright just exactly above the hole - tweezers or chopsticks might also work. Then strike several medium blows with a steel hammer. It must be very carefully done. If it gets in, even if it's a little slanted, the rivet will eventually straighten itself out when you resort back to using the chain tool. And there you go.
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Old 07-01-08, 12:13 PM
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If the rivet has clean straight ends, push it into the thinner part of chain.
Then get a large flat blade screwdriver.
open out the wider part of chain by twisting the blade in between the link plates

Then push it together.
then let the screwdriver out.
the link will grab the rivet.

then tap with a hammer
or carefully use a chain tool

better doing this on the desk...not while under pressure from the rear mech
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Old 07-01-08, 12:28 PM
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There's no need for all this hammer and screwdriver stuff. It's a little fussy to get the pin restarted and you'll want to use your extra hand (the trusty bench vise - EVERYone doing more than basics should have one) to hold the chain itself while you work the pin pusher back and forth to reset where you're centering the push to that you can work it in as straight as possible. If it's out by a few degrees then it'll straighten itself as mentioned but if it's out by enough to clearly see you should reset the position of the pushing pin to get it more straight. A pin starting in crooked will deform the plate more then neccessary and then it WILL be weak.

Once it the link will be tight. But our chain tools all have a set of fingers further towards the pushing pin for this. Just flip the chain tool to push from the other side or catch the first side a small amount before the pin is all the way home. Put the chain onto this second set of fingers so they are inside the plates and use the pushing pin to move the pin just a 1/2 a hair more. The link will now be as flexible as those around it. If not then push it the other 1/2 a hair more.

Is it a good idea to push out a pin and then back? No. You WILL do some damage to the plates. After all the chain is made in the factory by swaging the ends to make them larger AFTER the pins are put in place. So mashing the larger ends through is not going to help things. However I've done it and others have done it and Shimano manages to swage them only just enough that they are meant to be done this way. So as always with stuff on the edge like this YMMV.

I suppose that if I was some ToD or Tri athelete with legs the size of building columns then I'd never do this and would just buy a new chain rather than take the chance. But I'm just a whimpy 54 year old commuter that is happy to see the odd sprint to 25 mph on a good day downhill with a tailwind. So I've never had any issues with my pushed back pins on the odd time I've used them.

But PLEASE put those hammers, steel plates and screwdrivers away. The chain tool will do the whole job without the risk of any impact forcing things that don't want to go and possibly deforming the parts so that they need to be forced that much more. The only thing that would be handy is to hold the handle of the chain tool in the vise and then use one hand to screw in the pusher while the other uses a pair of needle nose pliers to hold the pin as straight as you can eyeball.
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Old 03-24-14, 05:19 AM
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putting rivet back in chain

Originally Posted by Gunmetal_Ghoul View Post
Darn, I took the chain rivet out completely and I can't get it back in. How can I use my chain tool to get the rivet back in through the rollers?
what I did was get a thin cable tie and link it around the


adjacent links to pull chain together to line the holes up. Then get a pair of pointed pliers and hold rivet ,place over hole and press in with vice grips ,tighten grips again and push further in to make sure it is located in inner link .Then remove cable tie and use chain splitter tool to push it completely in

Last edited by scorpo; 03-24-14 at 05:21 AM. Reason: grammer mistake
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Old 03-24-14, 05:29 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by facial View Post
Can't put rivets back in with a chain tool. It is definitely true that you never want to squeeze the rivet out completely. I myself learned this the hard way.

Contrary to what most people say, it is actually possible to get the rivet back in. In my experience, there is not much damage to the chain.

Find an anvil or solid steel surface; not even concrete will have the right restitution properties. Put the pieces together the way it would be normally, except of course for the rivet. If your fingers are small enough, hold the rivet upright just exactly above the hole - tweezers or chopsticks might also work. Then strike several medium blows with a steel hammer. It must be very carefully done. If it gets in, even if it's a little slanted, the rivet will eventually straighten itself out when you resort back to using the chain tool. And there you go.
First, I realize this is an old thread.

I have been contemplating what new tool to add to my bicycle tool collection...I think I've got it!
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Old 03-24-14, 07:13 AM
  #10  
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Most of the new chains are not designed to have pin re-installed. Use a quick link. They are more handy anyway if you want to part the chain to clean or some other reason. I carry a spare one with me all the time.
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Old 03-24-14, 07:48 AM
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SRAM or KMC chains with their respective quick links. I prefer KMC on 10spd as the links are re-useable. SRAM has been my choice for 9spd, and I won't fix what ain't broke.

When I got my 10spd bike, I got a 6 pack of KMC quick links. I keep TWO in the bike bag, in the blister pack. Cheap insurance...and much easier than shimano's replacement pins!
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Old 03-24-14, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
First, I realize this is an old thread.

I have been contemplating what new tool to add to my bicycle tool collection...I think I've got it!
It's an old thread but the concept of never reusing a standard pin on any reasonably modern chain is still valid. Use a master link or, for a Shimano chain, you can use one of their specific joining pins.
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Old 03-24-14, 09:13 AM
  #13  
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+1, once the newer derailleur chains got down to flush pins . to pack in 9 & 10th cog.

you only shorten them once to install and add the quick link to close the loop..
rivet operation in chain making machine spreads the pin head,
pushing it out spreads the hole in the link, so it stays loose and insecure after that .
should you try pressing it back in ..
temporary at best .. time to try again with a new chain..
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