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Removal of Sugino crank

Old 03-14-09, 03:49 PM
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werdigo49
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Removal of Sugino crank

I found a discarded Schwinn World Sport and am disassembling it for parts. The crank arms (if that's the right word for the shafts that connect the pedals to the bottom bracket) are Sugino aluminum. I removed a cap from each side (just a screwdriver slot) and a nut (7/16" socket worked fine), but can't go farther. Each arm fits onto a square shaft. Moderate use of a hammer on the back side didn't do it, and I can't get my automotive gear puller to stay centered on the shaft.

Am I missing something obvious? I've read about "crank pullers" in other threads, but don't have one. I know this was a cheap bike to begin with, but I'd rather not damage anything unnecessarily. Any suggestions?
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Old 03-14-09, 03:52 PM
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Theres a couple ways you can do it without a crank puller. One is to take a hammer and a drive and put the bike on the edge of a bench where the frame near the bb is being supported and tap at the inside of the crankarm from the opposide direction pushing it off the spindle.
Also you can get a prybar and edge it in there between the crankarm and bb and leverage away
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Old 03-14-09, 04:19 PM
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You need a crank pulling tool.
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Old 03-14-09, 05:49 PM
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Thanks very much, Rick and San. I'm obviously a novice at bicycle mechanics, but have been an antique car hobbyist for many years... and just removed the crank arms using a tie-rod "pickle fork," applied with a little vigor between each arm and the bottom bracket. Each of them popped right off with no apparent damage.

Again, I appreciate your advice!
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Old 03-14-09, 06:00 PM
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You should still consider investing in a crank puller. They're around $10 at a shop (but can be found for less) and will work for just about any bike with that style of thread.
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Old 03-14-09, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Raiden View Post
You should still consider investing in a crank puller. They're around $10 at a shop (but can be found for less) and will work for just about any bike with that style of thread.
+1
A dedicated crank puller removes the crank with the least possibility of damage or wear. I don't know what your "pickle fork" tool is, but if it applies any uneven action, it will possibly cause the softer crank to wear, not necessarily visibly. With repeated use you might end up with a "wobbly" chainring rotation.
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Old 03-14-09, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by werdigo49 View Post
Thanks very much, Rick and San. I'm obviously a novice at bicycle mechanics, but have been an antique car hobbyist for many years... and just removed the crank arms using a tie-rod "pickle fork," applied with a little vigor between each arm and the bottom bracket. Each of them popped right off with no apparent damage.

Again, I appreciate your advice!
Then you were lucky. If the crankarms were actually installed with proper torque then you would've risked damaging the frame, bb or crank while doing this removal. A crank puller is $10. Go buy it. Seriously.
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Old 03-14-09, 11:28 PM
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You could also ride around the block with the securing bolts off. The cranks are bound to loosen when riding.
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Old 03-15-09, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
You could also ride around the block with the securing bolts off. The cranks are bound to loosen when riding.
Yes, they will. And after that you can discard the crank since the square taper hole will no longer be square.
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Old 03-15-09, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Yes, they will. And after that you can discard the crank since the square taper hole will no longer be square.
All taper holes deteriorate over time no matter what you do. All of my cranks have been loose at one time or another and, after many years, I still have to bottom out one. Even if I did, the alu hole could be restored, good for a number of extra years, by a judicious use of a chisel.
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Old 03-15-09, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
All taper holes deteriorate over time no matter what you do.
Yeah, this way you can sure it's irreperably damaged with your method. No guess work needed.
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Old 03-15-09, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by flian View Post
+1
A dedicated crank puller removes the crank with the least possibility of damage or wear. I don't know what your "pickle fork" tool is, but if it applies any uneven action, it will possibly cause the softer crank to wear, not necessarily visibly. With repeated use you might end up with a "wobbly" chainring rotation.
Pickle fork or ball joint/tie rod separator:

It's a tool that I've never found any good use for as the proper puller always seems to work better and without any risk of damage to the parts being separated. Also, it's guaranteed to cause damage attempting to remove an aluminum crank arm with one.
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Old 03-15-09, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
All taper holes deteriorate over time no matter what you do. All of my cranks have been loose at one time or another and, after many years, I still have to bottom out one. Even if I did, the alu hole could be restored, good for a number of extra years, by a judicious use of a chisel.
How hard do you ride the bikes that you've "repaired" square taper holes in the cranks with a chisel? Using proper torque in the first place, a decent square taper crank should outlast you before the hole has deteriorated to the point where it won't stay tight.
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Old 03-15-09, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
Pickle fork or ball joint/tie rod separator:

It's a tool that I've never found any good use for as the proper puller always seems to work better and without any risk of damage to the parts being separated. Also, it's guaranteed to cause damage attempting to remove an aluminum crank arm with one.
You use that tool when

a) Cranks are seized on
b) Crank arm removal threads are strippped
c) a) or b) with customer replacing cranks anyways.
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Old 03-15-09, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by operator View Post
You use that tool when

a) Cranks are seized on
b) Crank arm removal threads are strippped
c) a) or b) with customer replacing cranks anyways.
I think this tool would work much better in any of those situations:

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Old 03-15-09, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
I think this tool would work much better in any of those situations:
Good one is the Posi-Lock puller:



$50 at Sears
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Old 03-15-09, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by werdigo49 View Post
Am I missing something obvious? I've read about "crank pullers" in other threads, but don't have one.
Get one. I have a Park Tool CCP-2 and I have a mid-80s World Sport. This is EXACTLY the tool you need. Just buy it. Once you do you will be amazed at the ease with which it works.



The outer threaded piece with the hex unscrews completely from the rest of the tool. Assuming the plastic caps are completely removed from the crank, you just thread in the outer piece with the threads, then just thread in the rest of the tool and wind it up until it pops off. It is so exactly the tool for the job, you'll kick yourself for not having it once you see how well it works.
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Old 03-15-09, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
Good one is the Posi-Lock puller:



$50 at Sears
We really should buy one of those. The handle doesn't seem like it's long enough.

Last edited by operator; 03-15-09 at 12:18 PM.
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Old 03-15-09, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
I have a Park Tool CCP-2 . This is EXACTLY the tool you need. Just buy it. Once you do you will be amazed at the ease with which it works.

The outer threaded piece with the hex unscrews completely from the rest of the tool. Assuming the plastic caps are completely removed from the crank, you just thread in the outer piece with the threads, then just thread in the rest of the tool and wind it up until it pops off.
Be very very careful when you thread it into an alu crank. It is very easy to kill the fine thread with this tool.
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Old 03-15-09, 02:19 PM
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That's why I suggested taking it off the main part of the tool first. It's easier to thread in a small piece than a large piece with an offset handle.
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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 03-15-09, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by operator View Post
We really should buy one of those. The handle doesn't seem like it's long enough.
I just noticed that. It can't be a very heavy duty puller if all you have to turn the forcing screw is a t-handle. I've use BIG breaker bars on the end of my puller (Craftsmen version of the one I posted above) without issue (press-fit crank pulleys on American cars are a PITA). I like the concept of the lockout feature for the arms but I wonder how effective it really is especially as the load increases.
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