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How do I get the axle out of this front hub?

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How do I get the axle out of this front hub?

Old 08-01-11, 11:10 PM
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How do I get the axle out of this front hub?

I can't tell what's going on here. I want to switch out axles to something shorter, so I can use a QR. But I can't figure out how to get the axle out of the hub. As far as I can tell, it's threaded onto the two nuts in the picture, and then the inner-most metal ring on the hub (is that the cone?) - that is, all of those spin with the axle. There seem to be no markings on the hub to indicate make or model. There's nothing that looks like a dustcap that can be pried off. I don't know what to make of it...

(I'm a newbie, so I may be missing something VERY obvious...)


Last edited by racer51970; 08-02-11 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 08-01-11, 11:23 PM
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That's a cartridge bearing hub. Dunno why the axle won't pull out. Have you tried taking the nuts off this side and pushing it through the other way?

I'm afraid I don't know much about cartridge bearing hubs but it seems like the axle should be able to be removed without removing bearings. I could be wrong about that, though.
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Old 08-01-11, 11:34 PM
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Likely the Joytech > Novatec (Subsidiary) > Dimension > SOMA > Raleigh > GodSpeed > AllCity > n++; crap...

Unless someone provides you with an axle to convert these to QR - you are out of luck.

=8-)
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Old 08-01-11, 11:37 PM
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the cartridge bearings are press fitted and they also keep the axle in place.
You'd have to tap them out to replace the axle.

However, have you bothered to see if the axle is hollow all the way through? Because all you'd have to do then is take a hacksaw and lop off the rest.
that's what I did with with my novatech hub.
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Old 08-01-11, 11:45 PM
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Seems like new wheel is best bet. Maybe you could trade with someone.

EDIT: although AEO's cut to fit idea might work too if axle is hollow. Screw some junk nuts on to use as cutting guides and thread chasers. You'll want the axle to be a little shorter than the outside of the dropout (1mm less on each side).

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Old 08-01-11, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by AEO
the cartridge bearings are press fitted and they also keep the axle in place.
You'd have to tap them out to replace the axle.

However, have you bothered to see if the axle is hollow all the way through? Because all you'd have to do then is take a hacksaw and lop off the rest.
that's what I did with with my novatech hub.
That will likely work. Just leave 4mm extended out on each side. Be aware that checking your dropout alignment wouldn't hurt - these literally are the weakest darn hollow single speed axles out there - even a granny with a 15mm wrench can easily snap those things via the current mounting nuts. Test with a QR rod first - if it fits smoothly - then have at it.

=8-)
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Old 08-02-11, 12:35 AM
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+1, there is likely a shoulder behind each bearing .
so tapping on the end of the axle [brass mallet, to not damage the axle.]
dislodges the bearing from the hubshell ..
you must support the edge of the hubshell to do that.
, perhaps there is a sleeve/shoulder combination
that is threaded on the axle, or it could be machined as part of the axle ..
pressing the bearings in holds the axle in.
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Old 08-02-11, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by mrrabbit
That will likely work. Just leave 4mm extended out on each side. Be aware that checking your dropout alignment wouldn't hurt - these literally are the weakest darn hollow single speed axles out there - even a granny with a 15mm wrench can easily snap those things via the current mounting nuts. Test with a QR rod first - if it fits smoothly - then have at it.

=8-)
They're hollow all the way through, so I think cutting them will work. How do you know they're weak axles? Is this something I should be worried about? 100% of my riding is on paved roads, nothing rough.

Thanks for all the info, everyone.
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Old 08-02-11, 10:44 AM
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They are so weak, people commonly snap off the ends protruding past the "locknuts" when overtightening the mounting nuts. On the rear, these hubs seem to have the easiest-to-strip cog and lockring threads as well.

(One BFer even posted a pic last year...)

Using as a QR hub will actually be an improvement - just check the dropout alignments to make sure they are straight so you don't put any non-linear force on the axle when closing the quick release.

=8-)
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Disclaimer:

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2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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