Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Broke a wheel.

Reply

Old 10-06-11, 04:58 PM
  #1  
Isotonic
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Broke a wheel.

I was taking a quick turn the other day at about 17MPH and my rear wheel fell off the curb. I got a pinch flat and the wheel is now bent. So I am in the market for a new wheel for my Giant Cypress comfort bike. The original wheel is is a free wheel 700c with 7 speeds. I would like to replace it with something stronger. I am heavy at 220lbs, 5'11" and I want a wheel I can depend on. The wheel is also wide and I plan to replace it 33 to 37 mm tire. I'm thinking something like a Continental Country Plus.

I ride 50/50 on gravel trails and concrete/road. I love to go as fast as I can most of the time and average about 12 MPH, topping off at about 22MPH on this bike.

Looking around at Wheels on the net, I am finding the choices and variety of sizes a little boggling. I am budgeting around $100 for this wheel but if it's worth it, I would spend more for a reliable wheel that would serve me for a long time and perform well.

Tire suggestions are welcome too. Thanks

Last edited by Isotonic; 10-06-11 at 05:02 PM.
Isotonic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-11, 07:53 PM
  #2  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 11,847

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i (RIP), 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
First, is the wheel badly bent or just out of true by a few millimeters/1/8" or so? If the latter, the wheel can be easily straightened by adjusting the spokes. If the former, it's possible to fix but likely not worth the effort.

So assuming you need a replacement you'll need to confirm a few things first. #1, does the bike have a freewheel or cassette? This page should help you figure that out if you can't find the specs for your bike: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html One easy indicator is the bulge or lackthereof on the rear hub. If you don't have a bulge, you have a freewheel.

#2, does have a nutted axle or a quick release? You'll want the same type of axle on the replacement wheel.

#3, what is the over-the-locknuts dimension? This will be either 130mm or 135mm. You can measure the distance between the rear dropouts as an alternative to measuring the assembled wheel which can be a bit difficult.

At your size, a 36 spoke wheel wouldn't be wasted strength. Your $100 budget is plenty as well. If you want to run a 38mm tire, about the only type of wheel you'll want to avoid is a standard road bike wheel (and there aren't many of them available with a freewheel or 7 speed cassette hub anyway).

On to some options, assuming the most likely scenario (freewheel hub, 130mm OLD, and quick release), this 36 spoke wheel will get you back on the road: http://www.niagaracycle.com/product_...ducts_id=34651

If you wanted something more robust, you could go with a wider rim like this wheel: http://www.niagaracycle.com/product_...ucts_id=509766

Both will take a 37mm tire easily. The latter would allow you to go as wide as the frame will allow.

Regardless of which wheel you choose, use some of that $100 budget to have a skilled wheel builder (hopefully available to you at a nearby bike shop) go over the wheel before you start riding it. Evening out the tension and making sure all spokes are at their safe max tension will insure the wheel stays true and lasts as long as possible. Granted, dropping the rear wheel off a curb is a tough task for any wheel but you'll be better off if you start with a well built wheel (and unfortunately, with the machine built wheels that are in your price range you get no guarantee of proper tension). This checkover might cost as much as wheel but it'll be money well spent to avoid the aggravation of broken spokes down the road.
joejack951 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-11, 09:54 PM
  #3  
Isotonic
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the reply. I am pretty sure it is a free wheel. It is badly bent. I bought it from a LBS in 2006. It is a Cypress model and has 7 cogs with a larger one called a mega gear or something like that. I will have to measure the over the lock nuts dimension tomorrow morning. Thanks for you help and advice. Especially the part about having the spokes tensioned. I would have never thought to do that.
Isotonic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-11, 07:38 AM
  #4  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 11,847

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i (RIP), 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
It's possible that the wheel won't need any work but in my experience that's an unlikely scenario. Machine built wheels are almost always very true (usually far better radially true than I can ever manage) but spoke tension is all over the place. It's much better to have an evenly tensioned wheel than a perfectly true wheel. Good luck with the bike.
joejack951 is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service