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Original factory NEW chain lube

Old 09-27-14, 09:04 PM
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Original factory NEW chain lube

I know this topic has gotten some attn. in the past, w/o much resolve IMO, so let's say we go for another round ...

That OEM lube -- almost like thin/heated Vaseline -- that new chains (SRAM, Shimano) are "packed" or impregnated in ... or ... what OEM dips or dunks the chain in before packaging ...

.... what is it? Where can one possibly get it? Is there technique for its OEM application? E.g., dunk the chain in hot/warm lube, etc.

Thx!
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Old 09-27-14, 10:03 PM
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Some brands apply a pretty nice lube to their not yet sold chains, others use a thick and gummy one that I don't prefer. On my personal chains I solvent clean them before install. Then lube them with Chain L. Andy.
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Old 09-28-14, 02:45 AM
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Doing some quick research, I came up with some popular chain oil options:
--Popular bike lubes (White Lightning, Tri-Flow, Finish Line, etc.)
--ProGold (ProLink)
--Chain L
--Boeshield T-9
--DIY/"homebrew" (synthetic motor oil + mineral spirits)

For daily apps, I personally use mid-price bike lubes like White Lightning, etc. (White Lightning's CleanLube is cheap and has Teflon and petroleum cleaners).
Realistically, I think the lube is just a bit-player in whole chain-maint. (=longevity) paradigm.
Every 200 miles (or when chain looks dirty) REMOVE CHAIN FROM BIKE and...
Wash chain in hot water + dish detergent -- use brush. Dry immediately with rags or compressed air.
Spray dry chain with WD40 (leave on for several hrs to displace moisture).
Thoroughly wipe chain free of WD40. Then loosely coil chain into shallow container (old coffee cup) and generously apply your fave chain lube (if the chain was neatly coiled, you can submerge it all in "oil bath").
Cover container and let oil penetrate overnight.
Then, thoroughly wipe chain with shop rag.
Install chain!

Last edited by elcyc; 09-28-14 at 02:50 AM.
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Old 09-28-14, 03:05 AM
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Lube is like soap as posters have mentioned here at this forum: It doesn't matter which one is used as long as long as some is used.
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Old 09-28-14, 03:06 AM
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A hot oil dip at 4:15
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Old 09-28-14, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
Doing some quick research, I came up with some popular chain oil options:
--Popular bike lubes (White Lightning, Tri-Flow, Finish Line, etc.)
--ProGold (ProLink)
--Chain L
--Boeshield T-9
--DIY/"homebrew" (synthetic motor oil + mineral spirits)

For daily apps, I personally use mid-price bike lubes like White Lightning, etc. (White Lightning's CleanLube is cheap and has Teflon and petroleum cleaners).
Realistically, I think the lube is just a bit-player in whole chain-maint. (=longevity) paradigm.
Every 200 miles (or when chain looks dirty) REMOVE CHAIN FROM BIKE and...
Wash chain in hot water + dish detergent -- use brush. Dry immediately with rags or compressed air.
Spray dry chain with WD40 (leave on for several hrs to displace moisture).
Thoroughly wipe chain free of WD40. Then loosely coil chain into shallow container (old coffee cup) and generously apply your fave chain lube (if the chain was neatly coiled, you can submerge it all in "oil bath").
Cover container and let oil penetrate overnight.
Then, thoroughly wipe chain with shop rag.
Install chain!
That's a lot of work to do every two or three weeks!
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Old 09-28-14, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
I know this topic has gotten some attn. in the past, w/o much resolve IMO, so let's say we go for another round ...
Why are you doing this to us?
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Old 09-28-14, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
Why are you doing this to us?
I think he just wanted to post his own chain cleaning method. I doubt anyone thinks there is anything to add to the OEM lube story since last week.
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Old 09-28-14, 07:32 AM
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and just to be sure .
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Old 09-28-14, 09:42 AM
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You are supposed to lube a chain?
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Old 09-28-14, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
Doing some quick research, I came up with some popular chain oil options:
--Popular bike lubes (White Lightning, Tri-Flow, Finish Line, etc.)
--ProGold (ProLink)
--Chain L
--Boeshield T-9
--DIY/"homebrew" (synthetic motor oil + mineral spirits)

For daily apps, I personally use mid-price bike lubes like White Lightning, etc. (White Lightning's CleanLube is cheap and has Teflon and petroleum cleaners).
Realistically, I think the lube is just a bit-player in whole chain-maint. (=longevity) paradigm.
Every 200 miles (or when chain looks dirty) REMOVE CHAIN FROM BIKE and...
Wash chain in hot water + dish detergent -- use brush. Dry immediately with rags or compressed air.
Spray dry chain with WD40 (leave on for several hrs to displace moisture).
Thoroughly wipe chain free of WD40. Then loosely coil chain into shallow container (old coffee cup) and generously apply your fave chain lube (if the chain was neatly coiled, you can submerge it all in "oil bath").
Cover container and let oil penetrate overnight.
Then, thoroughly wipe chain with shop rag.
Install chain!
Many people ride 100 miles or more in a week, and even with less mileage every 200 miles is far more often than needed. Too much work to get rid of water when one can just use (and reuse) petro-solvent instead. WD-40 won't necessarily displace moisture that is deep inside the chain unless you use a large amount. Way more lube than required. What exactly do you think you are gaining from all that?
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Old 09-28-14, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
Doing some quick research, I came up with some popular chain oil options:
--Popular bike lubes (White Lightning, Tri-Flow, Finish Line, etc.)
--ProGold (ProLink)
--Chain L
--Boeshield T-9
--DIY/"homebrew" (synthetic motor oil + mineral spirits)

For daily apps, I personally use mid-price bike lubes like White Lightning, etc. (White Lightning's CleanLube is cheap and has Teflon and petroleum cleaners).
Realistically, I think the lube is just a bit-player in whole chain-maint. (=longevity) paradigm.
Every 200 miles (or when chain looks dirty) REMOVE CHAIN FROM BIKE and...
Wash chain in hot water + dish detergent -- use brush. Dry immediately with rags or compressed air.
Spray dry chain with WD40 (leave on for several hrs to displace moisture).
Thoroughly wipe chain free of WD40. Then loosely coil chain into shallow container (old coffee cup) and generously apply your fave chain lube (if the chain was neatly coiled, you can submerge it all in "oil bath").
Cover container and let oil penetrate overnight.
Then, thoroughly wipe chain with shop rag.
Install chain!
It doesn't matter how you clean or lube your chain, because as little as you ride you will never wear it out.

Last edited by AnkleWork; 09-28-14 at 12:30 PM.
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Old 09-28-14, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
That OEM lube -- almost like thin/heated Vaseline -- that new chains (SRAM, Shimano) are "packed" or impregnated in ... or ... what OEM dips or dunks the chain in before packaging ...

.... what is it?
This question, at least, is really easy to answer. SRAM says they use "Gleitmo", but which variant is harder to deduce: https://www.sram.com/sram/mountain/p...powerchain-850

A grease like that needs to be diluted with a solvent or applied hot in order to penetrate the chain, which steps up the involvement for us punters. I'm satisfied by the results from stripping the chain clean with organic solvents and applying a nice thick oil like Chain-L every 500-1000 miles.
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Old 09-28-14, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
I know this topic has gotten some attn. in the past, w/o much resolve IMO, so let's say we go for another round ...

That OEM lube -- almost like thin/heated Vaseline -- that new chains (SRAM, Shimano) are "packed" or impregnated in ... or ... what OEM dips or dunks the chain in before packaging ...

.... what is it? Where can one possibly get it? Is there technique for its OEM application? E.g., dunk the chain in hot/warm lube, etc.

Thx!
SRAM chains come with a very good lube. The closest I've come is CHAIN-L.
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Old 09-28-14, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by MichaelW
A hot oil dip at 4:15
Darn. Beat me to it.

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Old 09-28-14, 08:05 PM
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Nice to know how they are made thanks.
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Old 09-28-14, 09:48 PM
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I'm not into cycling other than pure utilitarian purposes ... so... my most-used bike, a grocery-getting "commuter", converted from a Gary Fisher MTB, accumulates ~200 city/road miles about every two months.

About WD40 and my madness-behind-the-method maint. routine ... I use a clean plastic/glass instant-coffee container.

They usually have lids that don't leak fluid if container inverted or shaken. And it seals in those nasty fumes The container makes a nice "parts washer". One also can use a small sink or shower grate inside the coffee container when letting parts soak in detergent/Simple Green, WD40, or lube. The grate allows particles to separate to bottom of reservoir.

The smallness of above container allows full submersion of parts in small quantities of "costly" fluids (WD40, lube, etc.)

Last edited by elcyc; 09-28-14 at 10:03 PM.
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Old 09-28-14, 09:58 PM
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How does one quickly determine if the chain needs either (a) in situ lube/clean or (b) removal for thorough lube/clean?

Visual: Black grime, corrosion, etc.

Tactile/Auditory: twist chain with fingers ... do you hear/feel it "crunch"?

Symptomatic: skipping, rough shifting, etc.
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Old 09-28-14, 10:16 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
How does one quickly determine if the chain needs either (a) in situ lube/clean or (b) removal for thorough lube/clean?

Visual: Black grime, corrosion, etc.

Tactile/Auditory: twist chain with fingers ... do you hear/feel it "crunch"?

Symptomatic: skipping, rough shifting, etc.
Taste?
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Old 09-28-14, 11:07 PM
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My SRAM chain set me back 40 clams. For me, that's not cheap!

And ... yeah ... many of you above questioning the time/effort of my methods -- via subjective cost/benefit analysis and smug diatribes and self-confused delusions -- is not unwarranted.
Time = $.

So, for about 85 clams ... all you need is an ultrasonic cleaner and water ...


...and not just for chains. I think if one used distilled warm/hot water ... a lotta parts would come come clean w/o brain-cell-killing solvents some of you claimed would work better
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Old 09-28-14, 11:14 PM
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I have one of those HF ultrasonic cleaners and it doesn't work worth a flip.

- Mark
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Old 09-28-14, 11:15 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
Realistically, I think the lube is just a bit-player in whole chain-maint. (=longevity) paradigm.
Every 200 miles (or when chain looks dirty) REMOVE CHAIN FROM BIKE and...
Wash chain in hot water + dish detergent -- use brush. Dry immediately with rags or compressed air.
Spray dry chain with WD40 (leave on for several hrs to displace moisture).
Thoroughly wipe chain free of WD40. Then loosely coil chain into shallow container (old coffee cup) and generously apply your fave chain lube (if the chain was neatly coiled, you can submerge it all in "oil bath").
Cover container and let oil penetrate overnight.
Then, thoroughly wipe chain with shop rag.
Install chain!
Every 200 miles??

No way. I have Merrell boots and shoes that I'd use first.
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Old 09-28-14, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by elcyc
I'm not into cycling other than pure utilitarian purposes ... so... my most-used bike, a grocery-getting "commuter", converted from a Gary Fisher MTB, accumulates ~200 city/road miles about every two months..
In that case, I think that I'd just STFU and ride the damn thing. Chains are not that expensive and at your rate of usage if you can't afford a new chain when (or if) your current one wears out, I would suggest that you avoid the sporting goods/toy dept. of the big box store that you frequent and look to the shoe dept. for reliable transportation tools.
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Old 09-29-14, 03:33 AM
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Think, man!

Originally Posted by gregjones
In that case, I think that I'd just STFU and ride the damn thing. Chains are not that expensive and at your rate of usage if you can't afford a new chain when (or if) your current one wears out, I would suggest that you avoid the sporting goods/toy dept. of the big box store that you frequent and look to the shoe dept. for reliable transportation tools.
You sound upset and emotional, which is amusing and refreshing ... much more than the OT I commenced.
Your remarks are hubristic and 1-dimensional ... I have a decent $40 SRAM 3/32" chain which has been extremely reliable and durable since it's orig. installation in 2011. As a low-effort experiment, why not make it last as long as possible (I do measure and test it regularly as elucidated above)? This is not unlike the "hobby" of maintaining classic bikes (in fact, the GF the chain mounted on qualifies as one: it's a 1993 model) .
Folks ... please restore some public respect into bicycle discussions ... and not what's usually on the dinner menu: worthless replies comprised of low-word-count scoffs, unsupported dismissals, even unintelligent attempts at "humor". (P.S. I like good humor, like MAD magazine ... so stylize or stay away)
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Old 09-29-14, 08:09 AM
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The significant factor here is time, not miles. For most people cleaning every 2 months very different than cleaning every 200 miles. Even so, "brain killing solvents" is ridiculous. If you choose to clean when the chain "looks dirty" and you use the bike only for errands - which probably leaves out bad weather that's your choice. But your routine is of little value to others, and you are simply incorrect that previous discussions re: factory lube have not had much "resolve" (resolution). Factory lube is one of the best lubes, and it's best to leave it on the chain until it's time to clean the chain entirely. There may be a way to duplicate it but most people will not want to go to that much trouble for a rather small amount of benefit.

Extending the life of a $40 chain by engaging in a cleaning protocol that takes at least an hour only makes sense if one derives more pleasure from the process than from riding, which would be sad for you. (there's your requested humor). Your chain should last at least 5 years at your rate of use, which means you would have cleaned it 30 times, or at least 20 if you don't ride in winter.

Last edited by cny-bikeman; 09-29-14 at 10:57 AM.
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