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Is this frame toast?

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Is this frame toast?

Old 10-10-16, 06:38 PM
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AL7000
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Is this frame toast?

The fork is clearly done. (Or can it be fixed?) And there are noticeable stress marks on the toptube and downtube where they meet the headtube.

The frame is labeled high tension steel (hi-ten I assume), not sure that makes a difference.

But is this purely a cosmetic thing or is the frame done?
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Old 10-10-16, 06:58 PM
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nlerner
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Toasty.
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Old 10-10-16, 06:59 PM
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Steel is very forgiving. The fork is bent and I could straighten it in a press and still trust it. The headtube looks like the lugs did their job and the tubes might have flexed, but don't look bent to me.

I would totally ride the frame. You can always replace the fork if you like the bike and don't trust a cold set on the fork.
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Old 10-10-16, 07:05 PM
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BITD we used to straighten forks in worse shape as a matter of course. But these days worries about potential liability has shops shying away from that kind of work.

If you're doing the work yourself, even the fork can be saved with some hand and eye skill. The frame is toast in one sense, but in real time may take ages to fail. The irony is that cheaper crappier bikes fare better in situations like this because the steels used are beefier and more ductile. So while they are weaker, more is used and a lower percentage of strength is lost.

So, if you're willing to put in some effort as a learning experience, you an end up with a workable beater which may last another decade.
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Old 10-10-16, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
BITD we used to straighten forks in worse shape as a matter of course. But these days worries about potential liability has shops shying away from that kind of work.

If you're doing the work yourself, even the fork can be saved with some hand and eye skill. The frame is toast in one sense, but in real time may take ages to fail. The irony is that cheaper crappier bikes fare better in situations like this because the steels used are beefier and more ductile. So while they are weaker, more is used and a lower percentage of strength is lost.

So, if you're willing to put in some effort as a learning experience, you an end up with a workable beater which may last another decade.
One of the dropouts is bent also, would it be safe to straighten the dropout as well?
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Old 10-10-16, 08:14 PM
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Straightening the fork ends is the easiest, safest part of this job.

BTW - I don't say this is safe, just that it's not particularly unsafe.
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Old 10-10-16, 08:16 PM
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Old 10-11-16, 03:27 AM
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I would not trust that fork for a single ride! The frame does not look too bad and I have straightened worse. However...



To implement the repairs yourself in not a good idea unless you know what you are doing and have the tools to do it. If you can't do the repairs, an expert will have to be hired and that will cost lots. Finally, if the frame is not valuable, then the cost to repair might exceed the weight of good sense.

Trust the frame? Not a problem. Trust the fork? Not a chance!
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Old 10-11-16, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by AL7000 View Post
The frame is labeled high tension steel (hi-ten I assume), not sure that makes a difference.
This means it should not be a tragedy if you need to replace the frame and fork. And, you could probably score a replacement of similar quality pretty cheap.

Did you take it over a sweet jump?
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Old 10-12-16, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by chewybrian View Post
Did you take it over a sweet jump?
I wish I had a cool story like that. Honestly, I made the mistake of buying the bike late at night when it was dark...Learning experience.
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