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Pedals without dust cap?

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Old 12-04-18, 08:12 PM
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dlittle
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Pedals without dust cap?

I've got some old pedals from the 79 schwinn collegiate I am working on. I was going to give them an overhaul, but it appears that these are not serviceable? No dust cap, it looks like the entire riveted end cap is the dust cap?
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Old 12-04-18, 09:17 PM
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Probably not user-serviceable. I've opened up similar pedals and found the internals permanently swaged in place.

I'd just dribble some oil in and let it spread around and call it good.
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Old 12-04-18, 09:41 PM
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I use this on stuff like that. Gets in then sets up

https://www.northwoodstm.com/tuf-gel...oof-lubricant/
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Old 12-04-18, 10:48 PM
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It was very common for low end pedals to not be serviceable. If anything ever went wrong, which was doubtful, you spent $5 on a new pair.

I agree with the above advice to simply dribble some oil in there. You could go nuts and try to flush them out with kerosene or something first I suppose, but I wouldn't bother.
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Old 12-04-18, 11:55 PM
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As others have said, I lean the pedals against something with the threads pointed up, and then squirt some heavy oil around the opening, and let it run down to the non servicable bearings
could try shooting some aerosol white lithium grease down in there also
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Old 12-05-18, 02:27 AM
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Throw away the throwaway

Unless they have stood immobile, whilst rusting to that extent, the bearings and their racers will most likely be worn out. Any resurrection using oil and grease will probably crack the ball bearings during the first serious outing.
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Old 12-05-18, 02:45 AM
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Originally Posted by dlittle View Post
I've got some old pedals from the 79 schwinn collegiate I am working on. I was going to give them an overhaul, but it appears that these are not serviceable? No dust cap, it looks like the entire riveted end cap is the dust cap?
Doesn't the other end of the pedal at the crank side have nuts on the end of the rod that goes through the pedal's rubber blocks? I just overhauled a set just like those from a 1976 Schwinn Breeze. If so, you need to remove the rods and blocks and the assembly comes apart, then you can service them.

This mini-video shows the nuts that have to be removed.
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Old 12-05-18, 08:06 AM
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The blocks are held together with what appears to be long rivets, no nuts and bolts. However, that is an option: to grind off the rivet head, service and put back together with long bolts.
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Old 12-05-18, 03:20 PM
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-----

Another lubrication technique posted by a member for non-disassemblable pedals is to make a small hole in the end cap and use a grease gun with a nipple small enough for the hole to pump clean grease into the assembly from the outer end until clean grease begins to flow out between the spindle and body at the inner end.

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Old 12-06-18, 10:54 AM
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I like the make-your-own-lubrication-hole and drill-out-the-rivets ideas, but if the pedals are old, just letting some oil settle into them should be adequate.
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Old 12-07-18, 09:29 AM
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dlittle
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I decided to go the disassembly route, but found that the one end will also be difficult as the cup side is also assembled with a press on washer. Now I think I'll just try giving it a good cleaning and get some grease in there as best I can.
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Old 12-07-18, 10:08 AM
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I always love it when I get to open up and tinker with "non-servicable" things as I get to say "OH YEAH?!,..SAYS WHO" in my mind while I explore its forbidden "secrets"......(Insert evil mad scientist laugh.......)!
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Old 12-07-18, 02:04 PM
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dlittle
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I did a full clean, grease and shine, then replaced the long rivets with threaded rod and some acorn nuts and these pedals are as smooth as butter!
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Old 12-07-18, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by dlittle View Post
I did a full clean, grease and shine, then replaced the long rivets with threaded rod and some acorn nuts and these pedals are as smooth as butter!
Good work, that's a nice fix.
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Old 12-07-18, 02:33 PM
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You might consider putting in some Locktite in those acorn nuts so they don't drop off while you are biking....
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Old 12-07-18, 02:52 PM
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dlittle
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
You might consider putting in some Locktite in those acorn nuts so they don't drop off while you are biking....
I did use locktite, that was my biggest concern with using threaded rod and acorn nuts.
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