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Source for new threaded fork?

Old 02-04-21, 07:21 PM
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Camilo
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Source for new threaded fork?

I'm probably missing something obvious, but can anyone point me to a source for new, good quality, nice looking 1" threaded forks?

What I've seen so far are cheap (and to me, ugly) unicrown steel forks and I see that Wound Up makes what looks to be a very nice carbonfiber-legged threaded fork. That's my leading candidate so far and the only new, high quality, nice looking production, threaded fork I've found so far, and it can give you options for steer tube length as well as rake. I'd prefer a source for stock forks, but would consider custom.

It's not that I "hate" unicrown forks, it's just that for this bike, I'd prefer not. If metal - a sloped, subtle lugged fork is more like it.

Regarding "new old stock" or used forks, I am happy to pay more for some peace of mind and an existing company to back their product both quality-wise and legally. A good used steel fork would probably be the only used fork I'd consider.

I'm not really interested in a threadless set up for this bike.
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Old 02-04-21, 07:28 PM
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A quick search found a couple of options here........... https://www.retro-gression.com/collections/forks
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Old 02-04-21, 07:33 PM
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The best place for your needs, not fully knowing them is the back of an old bike shop, your local bike coop, or ebay. If you are patient a nice one will show up. The problem with threaded 1" steerers is that they all varied in size, so you could find one used in your size or greater to make it happen, but you'll need someone who knows how to cut it properly.
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Old 02-04-21, 08:03 PM
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Soma sells one: https://www.somafabshop.com/shop/pro...2&category=975
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Old 02-04-21, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by r0ckh0und View Post
A quick search found a couple of options here........... https://www.retro-gression.com/collections/forks
Thanks. I have actually been to that retrogression site, probably with a similar general search. I think I looked and didn't see anything available in the size I need (about 170mm) or they have very small rakes (35- "track" or 41 for the road forks). But looking again, the one they do have in the size I need warrants another look because it looks nice and should be good quality. Also need to give some thought whether a 41 rake would work out. I think the bike was originally built with a 45 or 43.

Originally Posted by mechanicmatt View Post
The best place for your needs, not fully knowing them is the back of an old bike shop, your local bike coop, or ebay. If you are patient a nice one will show up. The problem with threaded 1" steerers is that they all varied in size, so you could find one used in your size or greater to make it happen, but you'll need someone who knows how to cut it properly.
Yea, unfortunately, we don't have any bike shops like that around here and no co-op. The thing about ebay is that I have done it quite a bit (bought sold several frames, complete bikes and a bunch of components. And you're right, time and patience usually works, but the specs, especially for forks, are often uncertain. Often you have to ask to even get the steer tube and thread lengths, let alone other features. But I plan to check it regularly (I have a couple of canned searches) unless and until I find a new one I like. think I'd rather, for this fork, just find something new and short cut the process. I don't mind paying a premium to just get it done, find something that is unused, and also to know exactly what I'm getting.

Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
Thanks. I have looked there recently and didn't see anything for a straight on road bike with rim brakes.

Last edited by Camilo; 02-04-21 at 09:48 PM.
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Old 02-04-21, 10:19 PM
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This just sees like a job for a custom frame builder. He/she could figure out the exact measurements required by finding out the dimensions of your frame. Those dimensions also include what length of blades puts the brake shoes in the same place in the slots as they are in the rear. And while it is possible the original fork had 43/45mm of rake it is just as possible it had more. And of course then you can choose the kind of fork crown that will match the frame. Fork blades come in different wall thicknesses and replacement forks tend toward the too heavy side as a safety feature. And then there is the question of whether you want one, two or no eyelets.
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Old 02-05-21, 01:51 AM
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Jeff Lyon says he’ll will build a fork for $285. Not sure what parameters are associated with them, but BQ liked his L’Avecaise.

https://www.lyonsport.com/frames-0
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Old 02-05-21, 02:46 AM
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BLB makes some quite affordable threaded chromed steel forks.
https://www.bricklanebikes.co.uk/forks
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Old 02-05-21, 02:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
This just sees like a job for a custom frame builder. He/she could figure out the exact measurements required by finding out the dimensions of your frame. Those dimensions also include what length of blades puts the brake shoes in the same place in the slots as they are in the rear. And while it is possible the original fork had 43/45mm of rake it is just as possible it had more. And of course then you can choose the kind of fork crown that will match the frame. Fork blades come in different wall thicknesses and replacement forks tend toward the too heavy side as a safety feature. And then there is the question of whether you want one, two or no eyelets.
Doug, Is there anything like a registry of independent frame builders? I like the idea of supporting a local frame builder. My general impression (I know, not good to generalize...) is that many of the best frame builders are backlogged and may not be willing to take on a one-off fork when other full builds are in the queue. If I was in need, I'd be happy to throw some business to one of former your pupils, too.

Another thing I've wondered is how you might go about matching a fork to a frame that is sold without a fork. I've always been reluctant to buy a frame sans fork because I assume it may have been crashed, but also because I'm not sure how a non-original fork might affect the ride. Any thoughts or guidance?
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Old 02-05-21, 07:46 AM
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https://waterfordbikes.com/waterford-built-forks/

I've since changed my plans but I was going here to get a nice fork for my Waterford built Milwaukee Road.
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Old 02-05-21, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by r0ckh0und View Post
A quick search found a couple of options here........... https://www.retro-gression.com/collections/forks
The stainless steel fork for a mere $12 really caught my eye.
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Old 02-06-21, 02:30 AM
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Thanks for the pointers and thoughts on having a fork made. I'll check that out.

​​​​​​The Wound Up option had piqued my interest quite a bit too.
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Old 02-06-21, 11:40 AM
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How long of a steerer do you need?
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Old 02-06-21, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
Thanks for the pointers and thoughts on having a fork made. I'll check that out.

​​​​​​The Wound Up option had piqued my interest quite a bit too.
What part of the country are you in? From discussion above, the builder would want to have the frame to measure before making the fork.
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Old 02-06-21, 11:15 PM
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Originally Posted by tgot View Post
the builder would want to have the frame to measure before making the fork.
Nah. It's not an exact science. You can always make it longer and thread it longer and let the user cut it down. Or leave it long and use spacers.
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Old 02-10-21, 07:27 PM
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Originally Posted by clubman View Post
How long of a steerer do you need?
Steer tube + headset = 164mm, so a little less than that minimum, with a maximum of about 180 or so of total length (using spacers... I use a tall stem and it would just mean less above the head set). I'm not afraid to cut the top off to get within that range and dress the threads, but only if it would leave about 25mm of threads remaining and no more than 150mm of untreaded below the threads to allow the upper race to thread down far enough. I've worked with threaded forks and headsets enough to be comfortable with those measurements, but plan to play around with the fork off my other bike (similar dimensions) to double check. Heck, I don't have anything better to do!

Originally Posted by tgot View Post
What part of the country are you in? From discussion above, the builder would want to have the frame to measure before making the fork.
Good point. If I go that route (but probably won't), I'm sure I could provide enough information.
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Old 02-10-21, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by gaucho777 View Post
Doug, Is there anything like a registry of independent frame builders? I like the idea of supporting a local frame builder. My general impression (I know, not good to generalize...) is that many of the best frame builders are backlogged and may not be willing to take on a one-off fork when other full builds are in the queue. If I was in need, I'd be happy to throw some business to one of former your pupils, too.

Another thing I've wondered is how you might go about matching a fork to a frame that is sold without a fork. I've always been reluctant to buy a frame sans fork because I assume it may have been crashed, but also because I'm not sure how a non-original fork might affect the ride. Any thoughts or guidance?
It's not 100% complete nor is it 100% up to date, but there's this thread over on the Paceline forums: https://forums.thepaceline.net/showthread.php?t=113817
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Old 02-10-21, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
Source for new threaded fork?
I'd go Chipotle with a pinch of orange zest. Mmmm-mmm.
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Old 02-11-21, 12:29 AM
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just as a matter of fact, even if you were interested in a unicrown fork it will have a taller axle to crown height than that of a classic lugged crown. so, using a uni would throw the front end geometry off a good amount if your frame doesn't originally have one
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