Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Melting wax

Old 06-16-22, 05:44 AM
  #76  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,425

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto/Raleigh/Legnano

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 978 Post(s)
Liked 627 Times in 400 Posts
Originally Posted by UniChris
Presumably because the sideplates of the higher speed count chains are too thin.
Very interesting!
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto, 1973 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1974 Legnano. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.


tiger1964 is offline  
Old 06-17-22, 12:14 PM
  #77  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,425

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto/Raleigh/Legnano

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 978 Post(s)
Liked 627 Times in 400 Posts
Thanks, everyone, for the input.

Re-waxed chain hanging and cooling right now. Again, with Molten Speed Wax brand already pre-infused with additives, I held off adding more; I hope that's not a mistake.

After some 100's of miles, always in the dry but once in a while unable to avoid a puddle, the chain did not look like it needed anything; indeed, I wiped it down with a microfiber cloth and not much dirt transferred to the cloth. If/when I build an all-weather bike, I suspect I'll see at least some additional soiling of the chain. The freewheel looks nice on the teeth, but on non-chain-contact surfaces I see what I suspect are deposited tiny particles of wax, it looks almost like dust.

I liked the idea of pre-heating the chain along with the wax, so both went in the saucepan. That and the "hot plate" went to the porch, which is at 100F ambient today so melting the wax had a "head start". Turned the hot plate on to Medium, checked it after 10 minutes, getting there but not yet. Checked again at the 15 minute mark, already at 207F Hopefully did cause any issues due to "heating too fast" and, of course, next time I'll try the Low setting first. Once it cools, and the usual stiffness-breaking (I'll use a broom handle or something, I forget what I used earlier), ready for an install and test ride (much cooler weather coming fortunately); having lost about 2 weeks due to illness, I really miss riding.

Originally Posted by nlerner
This site says 5g of PTFE and 1g of MoS2 per 1 lb of paraffin
Originally Posted by sced
I use an old saucepan that I put on that stove at low heat - easy peasy
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto, 1973 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1974 Legnano. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.


tiger1964 is offline  
Old 07-13-22, 06:23 AM
  #78  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,425

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto/Raleigh/Legnano

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 978 Post(s)
Liked 627 Times in 400 Posts
By the way, it might be my imagination but I wonder if my drivetrain might be a bit noisier now, using the wax instead of oil. Hard to tell, my hearing is not the greatest. Perhaps the wax just does not deaden naturally-occurring noise. Anyway, got an e-mailed advertisement for dry ceramic lubricant and the ad mentions "silence noise". Hmm. Anyone try this stuff? And, if it's a dry powder, a possible additive to wax?
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto, 1973 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1974 Legnano. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.


tiger1964 is offline  
Old 07-13-22, 08:48 AM
  #79  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 1,683

Bikes: '38 Schwinn New World, ’69 Peugeot PX-10, '72 Peugeot PX-10, ‘7? Valgan, '78 Raleigh Comp GS, ’79 Holdsworth Pro, ’80 Peugeot TH-8 tandem, '87 Trek 400T, ‘7? Raleigh Sports, ‘7? Raleigh Superbe, ‘6? Hercules

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 760 Post(s)
Liked 1,562 Times in 756 Posts
Originally Posted by tiger1964
By the way, it might be my imagination but I wonder if my drivetrain might be a bit noisier now, using the wax instead of oil.
My drivetrain is definitely 'louder' when I put a freshly waxed chain on, but it quiets down after a decent-length ride. I think most of the noise is from the stiff chain going through the cage. I do think a wet lube is a little bit quieter than wax, but really have no idea of the physics/chemistry behind that. It seems that additional noise might indicate additional 'resistance', but from the tests I've looked at, wax doesn't do any less of a job lubricating than wet/oil lube, so noise doesn't seem to actually correlate to additional resistance.
ehcoplex is offline  
Old 07-14-22, 12:23 PM
  #80  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,425

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto/Raleigh/Legnano

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 978 Post(s)
Liked 627 Times in 400 Posts
Originally Posted by ehcoplex
My drivetrain is definitely 'louder' when I put a freshly waxed chain on, but it quiets down after a decent-length ride. I think most of the noise is from the stiff chain going through the cage. I do think a wet lube is a little bit quieter than wax, but really have no idea of the physics/chemistry behind that. It seems that additional noise might indicate additional 'resistance', but from the tests I've looked at, wax doesn't do any less of a job lubricating than wet/oil lube, so noise doesn't seem to actually correlate to additional resistance.
Hmm; my experience is that despite repeated rides, it still seems louder. Perhaps I need to invest in a decibel meter (just to drive myself crazy?)

I seem to recall, many years ago, that Phil Wood grease in hubs instead of more conventional products resulted in less sound deadening. Similar? Maybe.
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto, 1973 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1974 Legnano. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.


tiger1964 is offline  
Old 07-14-22, 01:29 PM
  #81  
ignominious poltroon
 
Polaris OBark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 4,011
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2230 Post(s)
Liked 3,414 Times in 1,785 Posts
Originally Posted by nlerner
I added powdered PTFE to my wax after reading about its lubrication properties. In terms of longevity, Iím getting around 400 miles for each application.
The worry is what it might do to your own longevity.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...emicals-cancer
Polaris OBark is offline  
Old 07-14-22, 03:34 PM
  #82  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,264
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 630 Posts
Originally Posted by tiger1964
Perhaps the wax just does not deaden naturally-occurring noise.
I suspect this is the case for a lot of fast stuff, road hum with supple tires being another example.
HTupolev is online now  
Old 07-14-22, 03:54 PM
  #83  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 17,151
Mentioned: 481 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3806 Post(s)
Liked 6,657 Times in 2,604 Posts
Originally Posted by Polaris OBark
The worry is what it might do to your own longevity.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...emicals-cancer
I grew up in New Jersey in the 1960s. Iím afraid the damage was done long ago.
nlerner is offline  
Old 07-14-22, 04:00 PM
  #84  
ignominious poltroon
 
Polaris OBark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 4,011
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2230 Post(s)
Liked 3,414 Times in 1,785 Posts
Fluorinated organic compounds scare me. Canning wax (paraffin) is safe to eat, and by itself isn't an inhalation risk, and perhaps most importantly, I am lazy and a cheapskate, so I just use wax with no additives, and switch chains every 300 miles.
Polaris OBark is offline  
Old 08-10-22, 06:53 PM
  #85  
Senior Member
 
timtak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Yamaguchi City, Japan
Posts: 1,091

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2 SL 2007, Look KG386, R022 Re-framed Azzurri Primo, Felt Z5, Trek F7.3 FX

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 73 Posts
I put the chain in a plastic jar (now with a lid) with washing up liquid and water, and put it on my whole body vibration machine which seems to shake dust out.

Then use an electric pot outside.
Chain Cleaning
by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr (but I will try to get a slow cooker instead)

Chain Waxing by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr

I may add some PTFE powder. I used to use PTFE plus oil lubricants, and still use Teflon coated frying pans.
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005003942997447.html

It seems to be PFOA rather than PTFE that causes cancer.
https://www.cancercenter.com/communi...n-cause-cancer

I seem to notice a little more noise, and perhaps a little friction using wax than oil (without PTFE) perhaps because I have overheated my wax.

Last edited by timtak; 08-10-22 at 07:33 PM.
timtak is offline  
Old 08-11-22, 05:06 AM
  #86  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
Posts: 311

Bikes: '23 Devinci Hatchet Carbon Apex1 '19 Norco Bigfoot 6.1 ,'12 Motobecane Turino (killed by dog crash), '12 Trek 3700 Disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 128 Times in 74 Posts
You use straight wax? IE nothing to reduce it's hardness?
Bearhawker is offline  
Old 08-11-22, 06:05 AM
  #87  
Senior Member
 
timtak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Yamaguchi City, Japan
Posts: 1,091

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2 SL 2007, Look KG386, R022 Re-framed Azzurri Primo, Felt Z5, Trek F7.3 FX

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 73 Posts
Yes. I use straight candle wax. I did add, part the way through my waxing adventure, some ptfe lubricant (ptfe plus light oil) to the wax but I did not notice a difference.

The wax a little feels hard for the first 1km but after that I don't notice that my chain is waxed not oiled, except that it has a very slightly increased noise, especially after a few days.

I have been waxing about every 300km.

I overheat my wax.

There is an electric saucepan with a knob for choosing the temperature at a local second hand shop and I am thinking of getting that.

I have ordered some PTFE from China. I wonder if it will come caked.
timtak is offline  
Old 08-11-22, 10:04 AM
  #88  
Senior Member
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,385
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1557 Post(s)
Liked 1,733 Times in 973 Posts
Originally Posted by timtak
Yes. I use straight candle wax.
Most people use paraffin wax (AKA canning wax) instead of candle wax to wax their chains.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 08-11-22, 10:22 AM
  #89  
Wheelman
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Putney, London UK
Posts: 838

Bikes: 1982 Holdsworth Avanti (531), 1961 Holdsworth Cyclone

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 294 Post(s)
Liked 670 Times in 336 Posts
From the research I did you want a paraffin wax with low oil content and no added stearin.

Here's what I use https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...e?ie=UTF8&th=1
Aardwolf is offline  
Old 08-11-22, 11:52 AM
  #90  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Portland
Posts: 357
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 267 Times in 98 Posts
I use a small crockpot I bought at goodwill for $5 and I use canning wax(paraffin). I read somewhere that in dry climates a rewax every 300 miles is advised. I probably wax mine every month or two depending on my riding habits, as I rotate between three bikes.

while it does take a bit to get the wax melted, it is easy. The biggest hurdle was degreasing the entire drive train. After that, it only takes 15 minutes or less to rinse the chain, soak, hang and check for tight links.
Lbxpdx is offline  
Old 08-11-22, 03:36 PM
  #91  
Senior Member
 
timtak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Yamaguchi City, Japan
Posts: 1,091

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2 SL 2007, Look KG386, R022 Re-framed Azzurri Primo, Felt Z5, Trek F7.3 FX

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 73 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
Most people use paraffin wax (AKA canning wax) instead of candle wax to wax their chains.
Thank you. I was completely unaware of the difference.

But at the same time, while some candles are made out of other types of wax such as beeswax and soy wax, I am under the impression that the cheap 100 yen shop candles that I am using are made out of paraffin wax. I thought that they might contain stearin (which may be waste meat and vegetable wax but I am not sure) but hey are sold as altar candles and the manufacturer and they manufacturer says that paraffin wax is the "main ingredient." Since they are used on Buddhist altars, I think that meat based wax is very unlikely to be used but their might be some vegetable wax in there. I have contacted the company.


Paraffin wax is used to make candles, but other waxes may be used

I see I can get paraffin wax for making candles from Amazon Japan for almost exactly the same price.

I find that there is a tendency (perhaps due to the importance of safety, and other reasons) for cyclists to use 'the right thing' on their bicycles. I don't know why, iconoclasm perhaps, but I like to codge/botch/bricole things together out of what I have to hand. Plus I like the idea of having altar wax on my chain.

Last edited by timtak; 08-11-22 at 04:39 PM.
timtak is offline  
Old 08-16-22, 06:03 PM
  #92  
Senior Member
 
timtak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Yamaguchi City, Japan
Posts: 1,091

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2 SL 2007, Look KG386, R022 Re-framed Azzurri Primo, Felt Z5, Trek F7.3 FX

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 73 Posts
Originally Posted by tiger1964
OK, got a bag of powdered PTFE here (sounds like I should wear a mask during the process!), plus someone mentioned molybdenum disulfide (MOS2) so I got some of that as well.
Originally Posted by nlerner
This site says 5g of PTFE and 1g of MoS2 per 1 lb of paraffin:
https://www.bikeradar.com/news/frict...-lube-formula/
Thanks. I ordered PTFE and molybdenum.
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004602430865.html

Originally Posted by davester
Or you could just buy a bag of Molten Speed Wax or Silca Secret Chain Blend that have years of research behind their formulations and will last you through many waxings, no frother needed. Note that ZFC has several warnings regarding poorly performing DIY waxes, i.e. https://zerofrictioncycling.com.au/w...-FAQ-v1.3b.pdf
The Molten Speed wax is not at all expensive but the shipping doubles the price to where I am.

The Silca Secret Chain Blend contains tungsten disulphide.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004362574239.html
timtak is offline  
Old 08-30-22, 12:59 AM
  #93  
Senior Member
 
timtak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Yamaguchi City, Japan
Posts: 1,091

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2 SL 2007, Look KG386, R022 Re-framed Azzurri Primo, Felt Z5, Trek F7.3 FX

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 73 Posts
The molybdenum disulfide powder arrived. I bought 50g of the cheapest I could find at 1-2um
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004610608795.html

It feels like super graphite between my fingers (you are not meant to get it on your fingers!).

The toxicity is apparently low but it is best to wear gloves and use it outside apparently.
https://n.b5z.net/i/u/10091461/f/MSD...ERS/US2180.pdf
Even at the 1-2um size (the largest powder I could see) it is so fine it seems to sublimate, like dry ice, into a gas or molybdenum smoke. I recommend the use of a mask.

I put a screwdriver tip scoop (<1g) of it into about 50grams of candle wax.
I thought it would make my handling my chain dirty, and the appearance of my chain is darker, but the wax traps the powder which did not come off on my hands.


Chain Lubed with Molybdenum Disulphide by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr

My chain felt noticeably smoother, like a freshly cleaned and oiled chain at the very least.

I have also purchased a slow cooker so as not to damage the wax but it takes about 20 minutes on the high setting to melt the wax so I will probably keep using my standard electric cooker pot thing more often.
timtak is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 10:10 AM
  #94  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,425

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto/Raleigh/Legnano

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 978 Post(s)
Liked 627 Times in 400 Posts
Previously, I simply swished new chains in Simple Green HP to get anything factory-supplied off prior to waxing; unsure if that has been really effective but I really have not had problems. I read about, and bought a bottle of Silca chain stripper and pre-wax treatment. Doing three chains this AM, I am immersing the Silca product in the ultrasonic cleaner, the bottle's contents just barely covers the chain. Max time on the machine is 6 minutes, I am doing 2 sessions per chain. Uh, not sure how I'll be able to tell the results objectively.
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto, 1973 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1974 Legnano. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.


tiger1964 is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 12:16 PM
  #95  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 17,151
Mentioned: 481 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3806 Post(s)
Liked 6,657 Times in 2,604 Posts
Kinda seems like overkill to me to put the Silca chain stripper in the ultrasonic. I put it the chain in a small plastic container that frozen yogurt comes in, cover with the chain stripper, agitate for a minute and leave for five minutes per Slica's instructions, then rinse with water, hang to dry for a bit, then immerse in hot wax and watch all of the air bubbles fight their way to the surface as I stir. Leave it for 10 min or so, remove and hang on a hook to dry.
nlerner is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 01:38 PM
  #96  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,425

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto/Raleigh/Legnano

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 978 Post(s)
Liked 627 Times in 400 Posts
Originally Posted by nlerner
Kinda seems like overkill to me to put the Silca chain stripper in the ultrasonic.
Overkill is my middle name. I needn't have worried about being to tell, the chains went in a bit tacky and came out squeaky clean and almost "rattly" so I figure the factory lube is gone form the inside bits too.

Originally Posted by nlerner
I put it the chain in a small plastic container that frozen yogurt comes in, cover with the chain stripper, agitate for a minute and leave for five minutes per Slica's instructions, then rinse with water, hang to dry for a bit, then immerse in hot wax and watch all of the air bubbles fight their way to the surface as I stir. Leave it for 10 min or so, remove and hang on a hook to dry.
I should have read carefully! I missed the water rinse; I normally avoid keeping water away from bike chains and, for that matter, any part of the bikes (PNW readers can insert laughter here). Well, done now, and hanging to dry the water. Meanwhile made more coat-hanger-wire hangers so I can do three chains on one heating of the wax.
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto, 1973 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1974 Legnano. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.


tiger1964 is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 02:20 PM
  #97  
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 4,481
Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1638 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 827 Times in 536 Posts
I wonder if one can use ski wax on chains. One would think that it may stay on the chain better than candle wax....
__________________
72 Line Seeker
83 Davidson Signature
84 Peugeot PSV
84 Peugeot PY10FC
84 Gitane Tour de France.
85 Vitus Plus Carbone 7
86 ALAN Record Carbonio
86 Medici Aerodynamic (Project)
88 Pinarello Montello
89 Bottecchia Professional Chorus SL
95 Trek 5500 OCLV (Project)
Chombi1 is offline  
Likes For Chombi1:
Old 02-28-24, 03:50 PM
  #98  
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Point Reyes Station, California
Posts: 4,526

Bikes: Indeed!

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1506 Post(s)
Liked 3,466 Times in 1,130 Posts
Originally Posted by Chombi1
I wonder if one can use ski wax on chains. One would think that it may stay on the chain better than candle wax....
To be truly C&V you'll have to use Jackrabbit Klister! It had a smell all its own. The rumor I heard was that it had a little pine tar mixed in.

Hmm... pine tar on your chain anyone? No problem with adhesion there.
Brent
__________________
"I have a tendency to meander sometimes." B.G.


Last edited by obrentharris; 02-28-24 at 03:50 PM. Reason: spelling
obrentharris is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 10:42 PM
  #99  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Sylvania, OH
Posts: 77

Bikes: 73 Schwinn Continental, (my first), 1993 Nobelette, Cannondale 500,Team Fugi, Raleigh Supercourse, Raleigh Gran Sport, 1976 Krystal, Tsunami, Giant Boulder SE, Series 30 Paramount, Scott Unitrack, As long as I have room the Hoard will grow...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Chains..

Originally Posted by timtak
Thank you. I was completely unaware of the difference.

But at the same time, while some candles are made out of other types of wax such as beeswax and soy wax, I am under the impression that the cheap 100 yen shop candles that I am using are made out of paraffin wax. I thought that they might contain stearin (which may be waste meat and vegetable wax but I am not sure) but hey are sold as altar candles and the manufacturer and they manufacturer says that paraffin wax is the "main ingredient." Since they are used on Buddhist altars, I think that meat based wax is very unlikely to be used but their might be some vegetable wax in there. I have contacted the company.

I be a liI may be hijacking ttle
Paraffin wax is used to make candles, but other waxes may be used

I see I can get paraffin wax for making candles from Amazon Japan for almost exactly the same price.

I find that there is a tendency (perhaps due to the importance of safety, and other reasons) for cyclists to use 'the right thing' on their bicycles. I don't know why, iconoclasm perhaps, but I like to codge/botch/bricole things together out of what I have to hand. Plus I like the idea of having altar wax on my chain.
On another front, my decendants are from southern Europe, were previous a racing family and used olive oil on all chains. Chains were quiet and lasted at least 750 kilometers. Just saying, no heating or dangerous hotplates. FYI
Ptcycles is offline  
Old 02-28-24, 10:44 PM
  #100  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Sylvania, OH
Posts: 77

Bikes: 73 Schwinn Continental, (my first), 1993 Nobelette, Cannondale 500,Team Fugi, Raleigh Supercourse, Raleigh Gran Sport, 1976 Krystal, Tsunami, Giant Boulder SE, Series 30 Paramount, Scott Unitrack, As long as I have room the Hoard will grow...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Chains..

Originally Posted by timtak
Thank you. I was completely unaware of the difference.

But at the same time, while some candles are made out of other types of wax such as beeswax and soy wax, I am under the impression that the cheap 100 yen shop candles that I am using are made out of paraffin wax. I thought that they might contain stearin (which may be waste meat and vegetable wax but I am not sure) but hey are sold as altar candles and the manufacturer and they manufacturer says that paraffin wax is the "main ingredient." Since they are used on Buddhist altars, I think that meat based wax is very unlikely to be used but their might be some vegetable wax in there. I have contacted the company.

I be a liI may be hijacking ttle
Paraffin wax is used to make candles, but other waxes may be used

I see I can get paraffin wax for making candles from Amazon Japan for almost exactly the same price.

I find that there is a tendency (perhaps due to the importance of safety, and other reasons) for cyclists to use 'the right thing' on their bicycles. I don't know why, iconoclasm perhaps, but I like to codge/botch/bricole things together out of what I have to hand. Plus I like the idea of having altar wax on my chain.
On another front, my decendants are from southern Europe, were previous a racing family and used olive oil on all chains. Chains were quiet and lasted at least 750 kilometers. Just saying, no heating or dangerous hotplates. FYI
Ptcycles is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.