Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Winter eyewear

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Winter eyewear

Old 10-02-15, 12:57 PM
  #1  
mcours2006
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 6,058

Bikes: Giant Rapid, Bianchi Advantage, Specialized Roubaix, 1985 Gardin Quatro, Norco Threshold, Raleigh Serengheti MTB

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 167 Posts
Winter eyewear

I guess I should have asked my fellow commuters before going ahead and ordering a pair of snowboarding/ski goggles for commuting in really, really cold and windy days. I found last year when I just wore clear glasses it was not sufficient protection for my eyes against the blowing cold. My concern with the goggles is that they may fog up easily and that my peripheral vision might be limited.

Has anyone tried using goggles for winter commutes? What's been your experience with them? Are some types better than others?

Or have I just wasted my money?
mcours2006 is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 01:08 PM
  #2  
namweNyrogerG
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I haven't tried full goggles, but I've never had trouble with using clear glasses. I usually buy clear safety glasses, not just clear cycling lenses, as they provide a little more coverage from the wind and cold. My commute is only two miles each way, so maybe you have more demanding needs. I'm interested to hear if you feel they are a significant improvement and worth the cost.
namweNyrogerG is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 01:12 PM
  #3  
InTheRain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,980

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 141 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
I guess I should have asked my fellow commuters before going ahead and ordering a pair of snowboarding/ski goggles for commuting in really, really cold and windy days. I found last year when I just wore clear glasses it was not sufficient protection for my eyes against the blowing cold. My concern with the goggles is that they may fog up easily and that my peripheral vision might be limited.

Has anyone tried using goggles for winter commutes? What's been your experience with them? Are some types better than others?

Or have I just wasted my money?
I recently started wearing goggles. They don't fog up unless I'm stopped at a traffic signal. However, I have not used them in anything under 38 degrees yet. My issue with the goggles is that my helmet comes down low enough on my forehead that it makes me wear the goggles lower than I would like. In fact, the nose bridge on the goggles ends up nearly at the tip of my nose. It seems like I may have to try shaving off 1/4 to 1/2 inch of the lower edge on the front of my helmet. I'm not entirely sure how that's going to work out.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 01:30 PM
  #4  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 11,854

Bikes: Stormchaser, Paramount, Timberjack, Expert TG, Samba tandem

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2342 Post(s)
Liked 1,049 Times in 687 Posts
It's rarely needed here, but when it is, I use my snowboard goggles (with a pin vent and adjustable vents) and helmet (which has a cloth liner, vents that can be closed, ear warmers, and a clip for the goggles). Fogging is not a problem as long as you keep moving to keep the air going in the goggle vents. I see they now have a version with electric fans! That's a bridge too silly, at least for me and for here.

Here's the hard sell https://www.smithoptics.com/us/techgoggle?lang=en
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17

Last edited by Darth Lefty; 10-02-15 at 01:39 PM.
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 01:35 PM
  #5  
scoatw
Senior Member
 
scoatw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: central ohio
Posts: 1,534

Bikes: 96 gary fisher 'utopia' : 99 Softride 'Norwester'(for sale), 1972 Raleigh Twenty. Surly 1x1 converted to 1x8, 96 Turner Burner

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Living where your at and depending on what kind of weather you're riding in. They should come in handy. I mean if you're riding in snow or extremely low temperatures then I don't think you wasted your money. I use two types of goggles myself. The first pair are Visorgogs that I've used for years. I use those when it gets below 40f/4c. They start fogging up at 10f/-12c or thereabouts. Below that I'll switch to your typical ski goggle. They don't fog up as much when it gets below 0/-17c. Both are inexpensive. The Visorgogs will last about 3 years before the ultraviolet rays wear out the lens. But they only cost $6US. So I buy three at a time. And they're great for using in the rain.

Last edited by scoatw; 10-02-15 at 01:57 PM.
scoatw is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 04:26 PM
  #6  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 6,633

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2109 Post(s)
Liked 913 Times in 461 Posts
I have tried using goggles and clear safety glasses and they all fog up on me. I got so frustrated with fogging and I don`t use anything anymore. My eyes and face seems to acclimatize itself to extreme cold, the problem is when there are ice pellets falling , they really hurt my face and eyes...If anybody knows the secret to keep your goggles fog free, please share your secret.
wolfchild is online now  
Old 10-02-15, 05:27 PM
  #7  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,717
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1004 Post(s)
Liked 556 Times in 360 Posts
I've used ski goggles with clear lenses. They're hard to find, but Scott makes them. They don't fog up, but I wear them over glasses, and my glasses fog up. I can ride OK without my glasses on, so that's what I do when it's really bitter cold (below zero). I am going to mess around with the vents on the goggles this winter to see if I can improve matters.

One important thing is to arrange your muffler so your breath doesn't enter your goggles. I'm thinking of getting a neoprene balaklava.
Gresp15C is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 05:35 PM
  #8  
mcours2006
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 6,058

Bikes: Giant Rapid, Bianchi Advantage, Specialized Roubaix, 1985 Gardin Quatro, Norco Threshold, Raleigh Serengheti MTB

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 167 Posts
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I've used ski goggles with clear lenses. They're hard to find, but Scott makes them. They don't fog up, but I wear them over glasses, and my glasses fog up. I can ride OK without my glasses on, so that's what I do when it's really bitter cold (below zero). I am going to mess around with the vents on the goggles this winter to see if I can improve matters.

One important thing is to arrange your muffler so your breath doesn't enter your goggles. I'm thinking of getting a neoprene balaklava.
I ordered one of these too. I'll let you know how it works once it arrives,..well, once it gets cold enough for me to use it. I'd been using a thinner balaclava, It's a game of trial and error with this winter commute thing. This time last year I had no intention of riding through winter, but did it, and for the most part was okay. I'm trying to get an early start with the preparation this year and hopefully it will make it a less unenjoyable experience.
mcours2006 is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 06:01 PM
  #9  
erig007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 6367 km away from the center of the Earth
Posts: 1,666
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I'm thinking of getting a neoprene balaklava.
Hope you're not talking about the diving type one. I have 2 of them and they are too warm for anything but Antarctica or Mars. Waiting for the next ice age
erig007 is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 07:13 PM
  #10  
TroN0074
Unracer Cyclist
 
TroN0074's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Michigan USA
Posts: 266

Bikes: Huffy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It doesn't matter what I get on it always gets foggy here where I live. I have tried plain safety glasses and anti fog goggles they always get bad.
TroN0074 is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 07:56 PM
  #11  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,443

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1521 Post(s)
Liked 317 Times in 210 Posts
I use a snow helmet and goggles (same ones I use for downhill skiing) when it gets below 20F or so. They usually don't fog up too bad if I'm careful.
kingston is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 08:11 PM
  #12  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,384
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
Liked 210 Times in 165 Posts
Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
.... I found last year when I just wore clear glasses it was not sufficient protection for my eyes against the blowing cold. My concern with the goggles is that they may fog up easily and that my peripheral vision might be limited.

Has anyone tried using goggles for winter commutes? What's been your experience with them? Are some types better than others?

Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I have tried using goggles and clear safety glasses and they all fog up on me. I got so frustrated with fogging and I don`t use anything anymore. My eyes and face seems to acclimatize itself to extreme cold, the problem is when there are ice pellets falling , they really hurt my face and eyes...If anybody knows the secret to keep your goggles fog free, please share your secret.
This is my first posting this year of my perennial post about the fogging problem:

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I perennially post about my winter eyewear for my 14 mile year-round commute, from about 35° down to as low as 0°. I must wear my prescription eyeglasses, and fogging is one of the worst dangers of winter riding. I am entirely satisfied with my system:

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…for eye protection is a pair of simple, wide, plastic industrial goggles that I suspend from my cycling cap using Velcro around the nosepiece. The goggles sit very comfortably on my face securely in place even though my ears are covered. The earpieces then provide a secure mount for my eyeglass-mounted Take-a-Look mirror. The goggles allow sufficient room for my prescription eyeglasses, and are widely ventilated to carry away the exhaled moisture preventing fogging.

[Some manipulation of the face covering is necessary. For example I lower the mask when at rest or riding uphill. After a few minutes cycling, usually I don't need a full face cover.] These goggles have made winter cycling entirely possible because all other attempts to avoid dangerous fogging have been nowhere as successful…

SEE ALSO POST #18 BELOW.

I have also often suggested that any recommendations for winter riding include description of the conditions in which they are employed, i.e. lowest temperature and distance.

Addendum:
This morning (12/14/13) I did my 14 mile commute at 11° F with no fogging problems. After about one mile I was comfortable with lowering my face mask below my lower lip. When going fast on windswept downhill runs of about a few hundred yards, I raised my face mask to below my nose. The warm, moist exhaled air kept my exposed nose and cheeks warm, and the onrushing air dissipated the moisture before it could fog up the goggles. With a slightly forced exhalation, I could even warm my eyebrows, with no fogging.

I realize now that my goggles and face mask are actually an integrated system of heating and ventilation that keeps my face warm and my vision unencumbered by fogging. The windscreen of the goggles is so effective in keeping my eyes warm that my eyelids actually perspired because my central core body was so warm, and my eyes never got cold, even on those fast windswept downhill runs.

Sometimes brief fogging does occur, literally with each breath but is then immediately swept away. One has to be careful though, that condensation does not linger at particularly cold temperatures less than about 15°, or it can quickly turn to frost and will not go away unless scraped off. This happened on a ride at about 0° at about mile 11 as shown below. Nonetheless it only occurred on the lateral half of the right-hand lens, and I still had enough forward vision, and left-hand peripheral vision so I could use my rearview mirror, and I felt comfortable riding the last 3 miles.

Finally, last Monday I rode in a sleety, wintry mix, and wore a billed baseball cap under my helmet. My prescription eyeglasses stayed dry and clear, and my vision was good with occasional swipes of the goggles with a gloved finger.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
attachment[4].jpg (98.8 KB, 377 views)
File Type: jpg
attachment[7].jpg (99.8 KB, 375 views)
File Type: jpg
attachment[2].jpg (75.8 KB, 369 views)

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 12-13-16 at 07:36 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 08:49 PM
  #13  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,717
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1004 Post(s)
Liked 556 Times in 360 Posts
Originally Posted by erig007 View Post
Hope you're not talking about the diving type one. I have 2 of them and they are too warm for anything but Antarctica or Mars. Waiting for the next ice age
Thanks for that pointer. Right now I have a fleece muffler, the problem is that my breath goes up into my glasses. So I'm thinking of one of those things with the little beak for my nose, to direct my breath downward.
Gresp15C is offline  
Old 10-02-15, 09:18 PM
  #14  
erig007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 6367 km away from the center of the Earth
Posts: 1,666
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Thanks for that pointer. Right now I have a fleece muffler, the problem is that my breath goes up into my glasses. So I'm thinking of one of those things with the little beak for my nose, to direct my breath downward.
Try the techno mask. It has 2 things necessary for this to work : something that allow you to tightening up at will at the nose area and also at the back of the head.
Plus you get an "anti pollution" mask.
I have tried different products and this type of mask (not necessary this one) seems to be the most efficient at preventing fogging glasses/goggles.
This mask is not enough by itself but when combined with a (wool) balaclava to act as a seal (balaclava under the facemask) and some anti-fog goggles, it does it for me.

Wondering if glasses/goggles could stop fogging with a nose warmer under a facemask....

Last edited by erig007; 10-02-15 at 09:30 PM.
erig007 is offline  
Old 10-03-15, 02:02 AM
  #15  
chefisaac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: cherry hill, nj
Posts: 6,144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
LISTEN to @Jim from Boston

he knows his $hit!
chefisaac is offline  
Old 10-03-15, 03:17 AM
  #16  
erig007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 6367 km away from the center of the Earth
Posts: 1,666
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
LISTEN to @Jim from Boston

he knows his $hit!
Except that the facemask on his pics is not the best against fog i have had one like this for a while before throwing it away (doesn't allow a good seal around the nose)
erig007 is offline  
Old 10-03-15, 04:32 AM
  #17  
mcours2006
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 6,058

Bikes: Giant Rapid, Bianchi Advantage, Specialized Roubaix, 1985 Gardin Quatro, Norco Threshold, Raleigh Serengheti MTB

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 167 Posts
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
This is my first posting this year of my perennial post about the fogging problem:
Thanks for sharing, Jim. I have a couple of pairs of clear glasses like the one you have on in the picture, both of which are large enough to give good coverage, and fogging up has not been a problem.

The pair of goggles that I recently purchased are the ski-type that encloses the entire area around the eyes. The reason for this is to keep the wind and cold air from circulating behind the glass/plastic. I do realize this actually helps clear up any condensation on the inside, but that cold air also is, well, cold.

If my breath doesn't get to the inside of the goggles, which it shouldn't since it's closed off, then in theory, it should work. We'll see.
mcours2006 is offline  
Old 10-03-15, 04:41 AM
  #18  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,384
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
Liked 210 Times in 165 Posts
Originally Posted by erig007 View Post
Except that the facemask on his pics is not the best against fog. I have had one like this for a while before throwing it away (doesn't allow a good seal around the nose)
IME, and from reading numerous posts on the subject, there are three basic methods for preventing fogging, caused by exhaled moist air onto the cold surface of the eyeglasses and goggles:
  1. Provide ventilation for the exhaled air, as described in my post; an advantage to the exhaled air is that it keeps the face warm.

    Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
    ….The goggles allow sufficient room for my prescription eyeglasses, and are widely ventilated to carry away the exhaled moisture preventing fogging… When the going fast on windswept downhill runs of about a few hundred yards, I raised my face mask to below my nose. The warm, moist exhaled air kept my exposed nose and cheeks warm, and the onrushing air dissipated the moisture before it could fog up the goggles. With a slightly forced exhalation, I could even warm my eyebrows, with no fogging.

    I realize now that my goggles and face mask are actually an integrated system of heating and ventilation that keeps my face warm and my vision unencumbered by fogging. The windscreen of the goggles is so effective in keeping my eyes warm that my eyelids actually perspired because my central core body was so warm, and my eyes never got cold, even on those fast windswept downhill runs.
  2. Prevent the exhaled air from reaching the goggles:

    Originally Posted by erig007 View Post
    Try the techno mask. It has 2 things necessary for this to work : something that allow you to tightening up at will at the nose area and also at the back of the head.

    Plus you get an "anti pollution" mask…
    I have tried typical, and expensive, double-paned ski goggles, and it seems difficult to keep that exhaled air from entering the seal, especially when forcefully exhaling as when riding uphill. If moisture does get into the tightly sealeld goggles, it can’t get out.

    It seems a tight headband would also be uncomfortable. An added benefit to safety glasses is I can mount my Take-a-Look mirror on the rigid earpieces.

  3. Antifogging agents, like Cat Crap, soap, spit etc.: I find that when exhaling forcefully, and colder temperatures, say under 20° F, those agents can be overcome. That’s why I suggest

    Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
    …that any recommendations for winter riding include description of the conditions in which they are employed, i.e. lowest temperature and distance.
I’m not trying to be contrarian about any methods used, but I am zealous because fogging is a difficult and dangerous challenge to winter riding, and would keep me off the bike for about 3 to 4 months during the year. Every year there are many threads on about the problem.

FYA, I was most impressed by this system by @TuckamoreDew of Edmonton, AB:

Originally Posted by TuckamoreDew View Post
Last year was my first year cycling through the winter and at very low temperatures I constantly struggled with problem of fogging glasses. This year I'm using a combination of a neoprene mask and a half-mask respirator and so far I've been able to ride at -32C with zero fogging. On the first test runs, on the coldest days, I experienced a slight fogging of my glasses inside my goggles but the dishwashing soap trick has taken care of that. It is such a relief to not have to worry about losing visibility during my commute.

I have posted more details here if anyone is interested.





Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 10-03-15, 07:50 AM
  #19  
erig007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: 6367 km away from the center of the Earth
Posts: 1,666
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
IME, and from reading numerous posts on the subject, there are three basic methods for preventing fogging, caused by exhaled moist air onto the cold surface of the eyeglasses and goggles:
  1. Provide ventilation for the exhaled air, as described in my post; an advantage to the exhaled air is that it keeps the face warm.
  2. Prevent the exhaled air from reaching the goggles:


    I have tried typical, and expensive, double-paned ski goggles, and it seems difficult to keep that exhaled air from entering the seal, especially when forcefully exhaling as when riding uphill. If moisture does get into the tightly sealeld goggles, it can’t get out.

    It seems a tight headband would also be uncomfortable. An added benefit to safety glasses is I can mount my Take-a-Look mirror on the rigid earpieces.
  3. Antifogging agents, like Cat Crap, soap, spit etc.: I find that when exhaling forcefully, and colder temperatures, say under 20° F, those agents can be overcome. That’s why I suggest
I’m not trying to be contrarian about any methods used, but I am zealous because fogging is a difficult and dangerous challenge to winter riding, and would keep me off the bike for about 3 to 4 months during the year. Every year there are many threads on about the problem.

FYA, I was most impressed by this system by @TuckamoreDew of Edmonton, AB:
I know about the 3 points and agree with your choice of items just the facemask that isn't the best against fog. I had the same one. This one lack the ability to do a proper seal around the nose. That's all
erig007 is offline  
Old 10-03-15, 07:54 AM
  #20  
franswa
Senior Member
 
franswa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: ATX
Posts: 1,738
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 306 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 67 Posts
I have these and they work pretty well. Not entirely 100% free from fogging up, but the best I have found so far. Inexpensive, to boot!

Oregon Cycling ? Kroop's
franswa is offline  
Old 10-04-15, 07:28 AM
  #21  
lost_in_endicot
Senior Member
 
lost_in_endicot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Endicott, NY
Posts: 385

Bikes: Electra Loft 7i, Fuji Crosstown 2.5, Gravity Liberty FB, Schwinn Voyageur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Has anyone tried any of the various anti-fog sprays that are available? Something like this:

Amazon.com: Jaws Quick Spit Antifog Spray, 1-Ounce: Sports & Outdoors
lost_in_endicot is offline  
Old 10-14-15, 06:51 AM
  #22  
jimmie65
Proud hobo biker
 
jimmie65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Schertz - New Braunfels area
Posts: 804

Bikes: 2019 Surly Ogre, 2016 Giant Anyroad 2, Lightspeed Roadrunner trike, SE Tripel (in process)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by franswa View Post
I have these and they work pretty well. Not entirely 100% free from fogging up, but the best I have found so far. Inexpensive, to boot!

Oregon Cycling ? Kroop's
Thanks for the link. Great price point on these.

I wear clear safety glasses but they fog up if I pull my buff over my mouth (for the cold or dust). I'm probably going to invest in a neoprene baklava with the vents as well.
jimmie65 is offline  
Old 10-14-15, 07:46 AM
  #23  
MulliganAl
Senior Member
 
MulliganAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Hot-Lanta
Posts: 756

Bikes: 2007 Specialized Tarmac with Mavic ES wheels, 2009 Specialized Hardrock, 2014 Rivendell Sam Hillborne

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
OP'er and the rest of you guys are just awesome!! Here I am looking for cold weather gear including eyewear for Georgia temps and you guys are in Canada and the like. You guys are too cool and remind me to never complain about my cold weather commute.
MulliganAl is offline  
Old 10-14-15, 08:12 AM
  #24  
canadian deacon
Senior Member
 
canadian deacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: East Coast Canada
Posts: 125

Bikes: Ratty ol' fixed gear and a 2013 Kona Dew Deluxe (SS conversion)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Very timely. I have some OTG goggles that work great until I hit "that hill" then I lose visibility due to fogging.

I was wondering what I would do this year. Now I know. Cheers.
canadian deacon is offline  
Old 10-14-15, 09:40 AM
  #25  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,937

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 485 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6882 Post(s)
Liked 1,518 Times in 959 Posts
I'm going to try my ski goggles this year. Unfortunately, they're pretty dark, so I might not like them at night.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.