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My lock options...u-lock & chain, or 2 u-locks?

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My lock options...u-lock & chain, or 2 u-locks?

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Old 09-05-16, 09:39 AM
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sbpark
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My lock options...u-lock & chain, or 2 u-locks?

Recently picked up a bike off craigslist for commuting to and from work. Work in a ****ty part of town, night shift. Bike will be locked up in a bike cage that is only badge accessible, in a "gated" parking garage.

I currently own a small Kryptonite u-lock and a Kryptonite Evolution Series chain and lock. Also have a small, thin cable that is looped on both ends that I have girth hitched around a rail on the seat, and will use the other looped end to pass through one of the locks as a deterrent so the seat isn't easily stolen (also, the seat is not quick release).

Here's my plan...both wheels are quick release. I plan on using the small u-lock to lock the front wheel to the frame. Then use the chain to pass through the rear wheel, cable girth hitched to the seat and through the bike frame to the bike rack in the cage. This seems fine to me, but not looking forward to lugging the chain around on my 16 mile roundtrip commute, so considering using two u-locks.

Thoughts?
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Old 09-05-16, 09:59 AM
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2manybikes
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If you always lock up at the same place, you can leave a lock there, locked to the rack. To me, the benefit of a chain is that it will go around something too big for a U lock. For example, a phone pole.

Last edited by 2manybikes; 09-05-16 at 10:00 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 09-05-16, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
If you always lock up at the same place, you can leave a lock there, locked to the rack. To me, the benefit of a chain is that it will go around something too big for a U lock. For example, a phone pole.
Thought about both those points. I am considering leaving the chain lock locked up in the bike cage so I don't have to lug it with me everywhere. As far as using it to go around a telephone pole, that wouldn't be an option/concern since it would live in the bike cage at work.

Maybe what I will do is just leave the chain locked in the cage at work, and get a second u-lock for locking the bike up for my grocery runs/around town.
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Old 09-05-16, 11:21 AM
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You can Buy Pitlock Skewers to replace the QRs? https://www.pitlock.de/en
Pitlock locking skewers _ pitlock locking skewers


I have an Abus Bordo , A folding Link lock.. Easier to carry in it's pouch, than a U lock and
also have a Integrated chain-lock from the same German Company..
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Old 09-05-16, 12:12 PM
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If it helps, I wrote about locking techniques and safety on this page:
Locking a bicycle

About how to choose a good quality locks here:
Bicycle locks
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Old 09-05-16, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
You can Buy Pitlock Skewers to replace the QRs? https://www.pitlock.de/en
Pitlock locking skewers _ pitlock locking skewers

This. Pitlocks are amazing. 100 bucks and protect your wheels, seatpost and headset while adding a miniscule amount of weight. Then all you need is one u-lock for the frame to be locked to something. I do this in a high theft area aka NYC metro.
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Old 09-05-16, 04:22 PM
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Since your bike is in a cage in a secure area I wouldn't be too worried about theft. The security skewers/bolts will be your best bet if wheel/accessory theft is your concern. Carrying around two u-locks to lock your wheels to the frame is a lot of extra weight to lug around. I like the two u-lock approach myself if I'm locking it to a secure object (example pic below not mine.)

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Old 09-05-16, 08:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
Since your bike is in a cage in a secure area I wouldn't be too worried about theft. The security skewers/bolts will be your best bet if wheel/accessory theft is your concern. Carrying around two u-locks to lock your wheels to the frame is a lot of extra weight to lug around. I like the two u-lock approach myself if I'm locking it to a secure object (example pic below not mine.)

I think that's the way I'll go for around town and errands and use two u-locks as pictured. Less weight carrying two u-locks compared to a u-lock and a square chain! I'll leave the chain in the cage at work. And as far as not worrying about a bike locked in a badge-access cage, I'm not that naive! All it takes is someone to not close the gate all the way or someone to be going in who doesn't belong in there when another is coming out and they have a whole slew of bikes to pillage parts from. It's in a bad part of Oakland and will be at night. We've have people assaulted, raped and robbed outside of where I work.

Last edited by sbpark; 09-05-16 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 09-05-16, 08:57 PM
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Originally Posted by sbpark View Post

Thought about both those points. I am considering leaving the chain lock locked up in the bike cage so I don't have to lug it with me everywhere. As far as using it to go around a telephone pole, that wouldn't be an option/concern since it would live in the bike cage at work.

Maybe what I will do is just leave the chain locked in the cage at work, and get a second u-lock for locking the bike up for my grocery runs/around town.

If you are quite concerned about your bike's safety, then I don't think carrying two U-Locks is a big deal, but it does help to get the "right" U-Locks.


Because of budget concerns and differing views on how much security is enough or too much, it is hard to ever get unanimous agreement, so I will simply tell you what I would do if I was in your shoes.


Firstly, leaving a quality chain lock at your work place cage, is a great idea.


Now if you still feel the need for two U-Locks, I would get these two:


1. To secure the rear wheel to your frame, Abus Granit X-Plus 54 Mini - 145mm long - Weighs 1.2kg
2. To secure your front wheel & frame to an object, Abus Granit X-Plus 54 - 300mm long - Weighs 1.66kg


Both the above U-Locks require both shackles to be cut in order to open the lock and both of them are very tough locks due to their 13mm hardened steel shackles.


You could replace either one of the above with the 230mm version of the Abus Granit X-Plus 54 that weighs 1.45kg, you just need to decide how much room you need your lock to provide.


Another possible substitute from Abus for either of the above could also be the Abus Bordo Granit X-Plus 6500, it weighs 1.58kg and is almost as secure as the above U-Locks, but much more versatile in your locking options.


Also, with the above U-Locks, don't cheap out and buy any frame holder for them other than the Abus Eazy KF Lock Holder & Abus Clamp for Eazy KF(Please note that this link takes you to the 12mm version, you will need the 13mm version for the above U-Locks).


I tried the cheaper lock holders from Abus and quickly junked them and got the Eazy KF gear and it is so much better.


Now with the above locks, anything lighter will be much weaker and less secure and anything stronger will be significantly heavier.

Last edited by ColonelSanders; 09-05-16 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 09-05-16, 10:42 PM
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Abus Bordo (Granit X-plus model, not the weaker one) is both more versatile for locking than a U-lock, as well as the easiest lock to carry of all the decent ones I've seen. Small frame mounted bag, or just a bag pocket - the lock is folded into a small "brick", not much larger than say two smartphones put together.

I leave a good chain in the place I park often and regularly, carry an Abus Bordo on the bike always, and occasionally, when going into high theft risk areas, add a good U-lock to the package (also Abus in my case).

It costs a lot to get good locks, but then you don't need to buy new bikes every year - lots of bike thefts in my city. Turns out cheaper in the long run.

Saddle, and other stuff are secured to the bike with bolts, or chains staying on the bike always.
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Old 09-05-16, 10:55 PM
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Onguard is another good u-lock brand that can often be found cheaper than Kryptonite. I scored an Onguard STD Brute for $35 on Amazon a few months back. I would shoot for something that is 14mm hardened steel or bigger. Anything less and they are susceptible to bolt cutters. A shackle that locks in two places is a good feature as it doubles the grinding time for the thief. I lock my u-locks to my rack and use a bungee cord to prevent them from rattling around.

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Old 09-06-16, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by sbpark View Post
Bike will be locked up in a bike cage that is only badge accessible, in a "gated" parking garage.
I can't imagine a bike getting stolen from there, even if unlocked. I would go with a cheap cable-lock. But if you will venture out to the city for errands etc from there, then as others have suggested, keep whatever heavy-duty locks you want in the cage. Since they're there, you might as well use them, and you can take them out on errands, but most of the time you won't have to lug them back and forth to home.
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