Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

What will really speed up my commute?

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

What will really speed up my commute?

Old 06-09-17, 10:38 AM
  #1  
Anitza
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What will really speed up my commute?

Hello all!

I regularly commute 28km round trip to work on a mid-grade hybrid bike, and although I'm reasonably fit, most people seem to smoke past me on the bike trails. But I'm getting mixed signals on what I can really do about this.

Option A: upgrade to a nicer road bike. But given the cost, I only want to do it if it would *really* make a difference. (Current hybrid is a generic "Genesis" bike). Plus, I have some bumpy roads to navigate, needs paniers, etc.

Option B: Get real bike shoes and clipless peddles (Yes I bike in sandals, please don't judge ). Would this be the best bang for the buck?

Option C: Something I'm not thinking of.

I'm new here, so I hope this is not too much of a repeat question.

Many thanks! If I can shave even 5-10 minutes off my commute this would matter a lot.
Anitza is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 10:49 AM
  #2  
no motor?
Unlisted member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,193

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1376 Post(s)
Liked 431 Times in 296 Posts
Slick tires will help if your using something with more tread.
no motor? is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 11:04 AM
  #3  
MMACH 5
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Posts: 3,777

Bikes: Dulcinea--2017 Kona Rove & a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 4 Posts
Find a regular commuting partner. Any time I meet up with a buddy on my commute, we end up pushing each other to pedal just a little bit faster.
MMACH 5 is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 11:04 AM
  #4  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 40,771

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Canyon Exceed, Specialized Transition, Ellsworth Roots, Ridley Excalibur

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2912 Post(s)
Liked 2,963 Times in 1,360 Posts
Is your commute mostly or only partly on a trail? If it's mostly on city streets, it's likely that it won't matter what you do; the limiting factor is probably traffic signals. My 4mi/6.5k commute takes me 19-22 minutes every day whether I ride my Tarmac or my old Rock Hopper with semi-knobbies. It's the stop lights.

Last edited by caloso; 06-09-17 at 11:50 AM.
caloso is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 11:16 AM
  #5  
kuroba
Senior Member
 
kuroba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Chile
Posts: 495
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 11 Posts
In my experience, going from a hardtail mtb to a road bike did speed up my riding, but not that much either, it's not like I'm cruising at 20mph but that's probably my fault, not the bike's.

A road bike, even one with a relaxed geometry, will give you a more 'aero' position than the hybrid. It would also come with higher gears (bigger chaing rings) so you could pick up more speed (I'm assuming your hybrid has MTB gearing).

If you currently have a 44/32/22 or similar MTB crankset and you commute is mostly flat maybe changing to a trekking crankset (48/38/28) could be a convenient way to pick up more speed without having to change much of your setup.
kuroba is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 11:26 AM
  #6  
brianmcg123
Senior Member
 
brianmcg123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: TN
Posts: 1,281

Bikes: 2013 Trek Madone; 2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 357 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 34 Posts
Have you tried pushing down harder on the pedals?
brianmcg123 is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 12:17 PM
  #7  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 27,570

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Mentioned: 108 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4627 Post(s)
Liked 2,319 Times in 1,584 Posts
started with a mountain bike with knobby tires carrying all my stuff to & from, cpl years later I was riding a road bike with slicks & stocking up on supplies by driving a weekday or riding on the weekend

in between was all kinds of nonsense like slicks for the mountain bike, then bolt on drops for the straight bar, then a hybrid, then slicks for the hybrid, then bolt on drop bars for the hybrid, then actual drop bars for the hybrid, then a 30 yr old heavy road bike, then a light(er) road bike, etc etc.

finally landed with an aluminum road bike w a carbon fork, integrated brake / shift levers & a leather saddle

my advice for myself would be, skip the nonsense & go directly to a nice light road bike that can take fenders & a rack

oh & I don't get passed anymore except by the guys w the burly legs, happy smiles & a little wave. don't mind that

Last edited by rumrunn6; 06-09-17 at 01:17 PM.
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 12:18 PM
  #8  
NewATBikeComute
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Boston-ish
Posts: 220

Bikes: Trek 800 Sport,Cavelo Gara

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 4 Posts
I ride a similar distance (6-16 miles RT, depending on the switchover point), and am still quite new at this as well. I offer my experiences, not advice.

I switched out MTB tires to somewhat aggressive 'urban' tires (but puncture-resistant) last year. This year, I went to a lighter weight smooth tread tire, and lighter weight tubes, and gained about 0.7 mph immediately.* That cut my time down, and I felt less sweaty as a bonus.

The lightest clothing (warm enough to start, but maximize cooling during the ride) means I don't have to slow down as much the last few miles; I do swap shirts once I get to the office.

Replacing the chain (old one was dirty and stretched), and keeping it clean feels much smoother, vibrates less. Not sure how much it helps.

I use toe clips, as it helps me keep my feet on the pedals as I go over potholes and storm drains; I am not quite comfortable with clipping in, and I bike in with my work shoes. Works for me.

I go much faster on my road bike, and on weekends I go much faster because I ride on country roads with (almost) no traffic lights, or even stop signs. Getting in at least one more demanding ride on the weekends seems to pay off, as I can pay attention to cadence, fit, shifting, etc.

My shortest route also has the most lights, and hills, so isn't necessarily the fastest route.

*I also started carrying a spare tube, instead of just a patch kit, as I figure the chances of a flat are probably several times higher.
NewATBikeComute is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 12:30 PM
  #9  
Amitoj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Windham, NH
Posts: 299

Bikes: Bianchi Campione, Specialized Diverge Comp E5

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Go with B. It will make your efforts more efficient and give you a better workout as well, since you will be able to pull as well.

Best investment I did on my hybrid. Although it has not stopped people from zooming past me I figure there will always be people faster than me, so I just focus on my own riding.
Amitoj is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 12:48 PM
  #10  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 13,046

Bikes: Stormchaser, Paramount, Timberjack, Expert TG, Samba tandem

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2817 Post(s)
Liked 1,642 Times in 1,079 Posts
Get a $10 computer at Walmart, set it to show average speed for the day, and try to push that number up
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 01:13 PM
  #11  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,305

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,035 Times in 686 Posts
Originally Posted by Anitza View Post
Hello all!

I regularly commute 28km round trip to work on a mid-grade hybrid bike, and although I'm reasonably fit, most people seem to smoke past me on the bike trails. But I'm getting mixed signals on what I can really do about this.

Option A: upgrade to a nicer road bike. But given the cost, I only want to do it if it would *really* make a difference. (Current hybrid is a generic "Genesis" bike). Plus, I have some bumpy roads to navigate, needs paniers, etc.

Option B: Get real bike shoes and clipless peddles (Yes I bike in sandals, please don't judge ). Would this be the best bang for the buck?

Option C: Something I'm not thinking of.

I'm new here, so I hope this is not too much of a repeat question.

Many thanks! If I can shave even 5-10 minutes off my commute this would matter a lot.
Option D: Think if there is good reason why you give a dang if other cyclists "smoke" you while commuting. Are you in a race or that big a hurry to get to/from work?

If no rational reason comes to mind, forget about all the biased mixed signals emanating from the hypesters on the blogosphere or at the LBS and enjoy your ride. It is already "real".
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 01:27 PM
  #12  
mcours2006
Senior Member
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 6,133

Bikes: ...a few.

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1971 Post(s)
Liked 356 Times in 202 Posts
Two words: E Bike.
mcours2006 is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 01:30 PM
  #13  
mcours2006
Senior Member
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 6,133

Bikes: ...a few.

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1971 Post(s)
Liked 356 Times in 202 Posts
Seriously. Twenty eight km is not a short commute by anyone's standards. Never mind the guys smoking you on the MUP, it's a lot of distance to be doing it day in and day out. An ebike can cut your commute time drastically.
mcours2006 is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 01:34 PM
  #14  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,336 Times in 844 Posts
Option C: Something I'm not thinking of.
Multi Mode, take the Bus for the bulk of the distance, bike goes on the rack in front of it,
Bike to and from the most convenient bus stops.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 01:46 PM
  #15  
EL LUCHADOR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Anitza View Post
Hello all!

I regularly commute 28km round trip to work on a mid-grade hybrid bike, and although I'm reasonably fit, most people seem to smoke past me on the bike trails. But I'm getting mixed signals on what I can really do about this.

Option A: upgrade to a nicer road bike. But given the cost, I only want to do it if it would *really* make a difference. (Current hybrid is a generic "Genesis" bike). Plus, I have some bumpy roads to navigate, needs paniers, etc.

Option B: Get real bike shoes and clipless peddles (Yes I bike in sandals, please don't judge ). Would this be the best bang for the buck?

Option C: Something I'm not thinking of.

I'm new here, so I hope this is not too much of a repeat question.

Many thanks! If I can shave even 5-10 minutes off my commute this would matter a lot.


1. what is your average speed?
2. what tires are you on?


thanks
EL LUCHADOR is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 01:55 PM
  #16  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,751

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3558 Post(s)
Liked 2,357 Times in 1,545 Posts
The big gains - dropped handlebars, especially on the windy days. Decent rolling tires on reasonably light wheels. Pedals and cleats (or toestraps) so you can pedal full circles. None of this has to be a big cash outlay. An older steel sport bike can make for a very good commuter. It is possible that your hybrid can take dropped handlebars and serve well, but that depends on both you and the bike. (Fit issues.) Pedals and shoes are an easy upgrade and can be transferred to any bike you get in the future. (I kept my work shoes at work.)

If you want to avoid the used bike hassle and are willing to spend some more money, look at a bike like the Surleys. (And don't pay attention to I-Like-To-Bike. He is always quick to point out how what we do and think are wrong.)

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 02:10 PM
  #17  
RifterAD
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: St Louis area
Posts: 30

Bikes: '20 Specialized Roubiax

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The only 2 things that have noticeably worked for me (in my limited experience) is to get slick tires and to reduce the weight.

I bought some lightweight tires that are still wide enough to soak up the bumpy roads. I was hesitant to get wider tires (700x35), but I'm glad that I did because they were noticeably faster than the semi-knobby tires I had which were skinnier.

If you already have slick tires, look at reducing the weight of anything and everything. I was surprised how much a pound or two made. As mentioned, I had lighter tires, but I also went through my bags and got rid of the little stuff that I really didn't need (but kept "just in case"). For instance, I had a flashlight that I can mount to my bike, so I did not need my little LED keychain light and the charging cable that I was also carrying around. After taking out a handful of things like that, I was surprised that so little actually amounted to a better ride...I just hope I don't become a junky obsessed with weight savings down the road. At some point, that ends up costing more than it's worth. $$$
RifterAD is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 02:37 PM
  #18  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,661

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 2007 Dahon Boardwalk, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International, 2006 Felt F65

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1274 Post(s)
Liked 1,315 Times in 664 Posts
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Is your commute mostly or only partly on a trail? If it's mostly on city streets, it's likely that it won't matter what you do; the limiting factor is probably traffic signals. My 4mi/6.5k commute takes me 19-22 minutes every day whether I ride my Tarmac or my old Rock Hopper with semi-knobbies. It's the stop lights.
+1
I commute 17km round trip on city streets. I have three different bikes, a light 1980s steel roadbike, a new mid-weight semi-touring road bike , and a very heavy 1990s hard tail Mountain bike with higher road gearing. All three run on smooth street tires (except the MTB in winter, then it's studded snows).

On street tires, all three average the same running time due to lights, etc. I have multiple routes of similar lengths and the one with the least number of lights is quicker by 5 minutes.

Normally I ride at a good clip, 21kph in (It's slightly downhill) and 18.5kph on the uphill ride home. Occasionally I get the urge to see how fast I can ride my commute. Pushing as hard as I can I can get my average speeds up by about 1.5kph. This usually translates into a total time savings of only 5 minutes.

For instance my average time riding home is 45-48 minutes. Pushing it as hard as I can means 38-43 minutes. And when you add time to shower and change (shower at home only) it is not worth it to me.

Based on what you described I would make the following suggestions for the most speed for the least money:

A) Toe Clips with Straps. They probably work with the platform pedals you already have and they are not as good as clipless, but they are cheaper than buying and installing "Clipless" pedals which need clipless shoes, and with toe clips you can wear any shoes you want, like old sneakers, but probably not open toe sandals. Approx $12 a pair online.

B) Smooth street tires. This alone made a 2.5 kph difference on my Mountain Bike Based Commuter. over knobby mountain bike tires. Without traffic, that's good for loosing almost 7.5 minutes without traffic (I think). If you don't need super tough puncture resistant tires these can be found on sale on line for less than $30 a pair. If you need more puncture resistance, try adding tire liners, like Mr. Tuffy's. $12 a pair or so, and then you can continue buying regular, less expensive tires.

C) An aero bar or drop-bar-end add-ons. Even on a straight bar bike. I put an aero bar on my Mountain Bike Commuter to increase the number of hand positions I have, and away from traffic I gain a couple of kph. I don't like riding in the aero position too long. But I also have bar-ends I mounted inboard. They approximate riding on the drops and I am more tucked in than on the normal flat-bar grips. I bought mine for $30 a few years ago, and the bar ends were like $12. This was on sale at a local bike shop.

In fact, check with your LBS first...they may have deals on all of these things.

Good luck!

Here's a photo of my Mountain Bike based commuter:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
14923664335471.jpg (101.2 KB, 209 views)
BobbyG is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 02:44 PM
  #19  
Anitza
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What will really speed up my commute?

Hello all!

I regularly commute 28km round trip to work on a mid-grade hybrid bike, and although I'm reasonably fit, most people seem to smoke past me on the bike trails. But I'm getting mixed signals on what I can really do about this.

Option A: upgrade to a nicer road bike. But given the cost, I only want to do it if it would *really* make a difference. (Current hybrid is a generic "Genesis" bike). Plus, I have some bumpy roads to navigate, needs paniers, etc.

Option B: Get real bike shoes and clipless peddles (Yes I bike in sandals, please don't judge ). Would this be the best bang for the buck?

Option C: Something I'm not thinking of.

I'm new here, so I hope this is not too much of a repeat question.

Many thanks! If I can shave even 5-10 minutes off my commute this would matter a lot.
Anitza is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 02:45 PM
  #20  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,101
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
The reality is that the people that smoke past you might only get to their destination a few minutes sooner than you if they were going to the same place.

If you have a lot of stop lights, it's not going to matter too much what you ride, that's going to be the limiting factor. If you have some decent stretches of open road, then a combination of changes could knock off 5 minutes. 10 minutes might be harder to achieve consistently and it really depends on how hard you're willing to work.

I really doubt a road bike or clipless pedals alone would make more than a few minutes difference. You'll have to ride faster. Now, just getting on a road bike might help. Sometimes it's just an attitude thing.

Regardless of your fitness level, cycling is a different activity. There are all sorts of ways to train yourself to go faster. Ultimately (short of an e-bike), if you want to go much faster, that's what I think it's going to take.

Think about it for a moment. At any given point during your commute, you can choose to go faster, right? So the key is to train your body to be able to maintain a faster pace for longer periods of time. How do you do that? Well, you ride faster.
Do a little research into interval training. That will help.

Also a little competition can help, even if it's with yourself. "Strava" and other smart phone apps like it automatically keeps a history of your times. You can see how you're doing compared to your personal best and the best rides of other people on the same stretches.

Last edited by tjspiel; 06-09-17 at 02:58 PM.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 02:51 PM
  #21  
Anitza
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks everyone!
Just to clarify, I have fairly slick tires right now, and few stops along the way fortunately (but lots of hills).
I'm going to try lowering my handlebars (left over from when I was pulling a child and wanted to be upright), lightening up some accessories, and trying clips/clipless of some kind.
I have a background in physics, so I have indeed "tried pushing down harder on the pedals". But riding with a buddy is a good idea for helping me push harder
I don't measure my speed, but I do about 14km in 50 minutes, with a lot of substantial hills, so about 17km/hr.
Very much appreciated!!
Anitza is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 03:03 PM
  #22  
GeneO 
Senior Member
 
GeneO's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: midwest
Posts: 2,517

Bikes: 2018 Roubaix Expert Di2, 2016 Diverge Expert X1

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 478 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 97 Posts
Get a red bike, they are faster. Also buy an expensive bike, it will motivate you to go faster.
GeneO is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 03:17 PM
  #23  
ilynne
Free and Self-Reliant
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 180

Bikes: Retrovelo Paula, 3 Speed Brompton, Rivendell Cheviot

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by GeneO View Post
Get a red bike, they are faster. Also buy an expensive bike, it will motivate you to go faster.
It is a proven fact that orange bikes are faster.
ilynne is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 03:38 PM
  #24  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,126
Mentioned: 214 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16340 Post(s)
Liked 3,545 Times in 2,631 Posts
Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
Seriously. Twenty eight km is not a short commute by anyone's standards. Never mind the guys smoking you on the MUP, it's a lot of distance to be doing it day in and day out. An ebike can cut your commute time drastically.
Pretty short.
It comes out to be only about 9 miles each way.
As mentioned above, a lot depends on how you are riding now. Those who ride longer distances often gravitate towards nicer, lighter bikes, but each person is different too.

There are a lot of different speed estimates out there. I do think you could gain some speed by going to a road bike, but don't expect to be transformed overnight from commuting at 10mph to 20mph. Perhaps a gain of 1-3 MPH on average.

I ride a road bike a lot, but am also pretty careful about what I run over. Cross/Cyclocross/Gravel bikes are an option that are a little more robust, but still with many features of road bikes.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 06-09-17, 03:42 PM
  #25  
mcours2006
Senior Member
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 6,133

Bikes: ...a few.

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1971 Post(s)
Liked 356 Times in 202 Posts
Originally Posted by Anitza View Post
I don't measure my speed, but I do about 14km in 50 minutes, with a lot of substantial hills, so about 17km/hr.
!
You have a 28-km ride to work on a very hilly route, so riding 100+ minutes one-way...I'm going to reiterate my suggestion of an ebike. You could easily average 25+ km/h, in which case you will spend a tad over an hour one way. That's mover 50% faster...unless of course you like to suffer.

Edit:
Never mind. I misread the original post--I thought 28 km one way. No ebike necessary. HTFU!
mcours2006 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.