Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 03-12-18, 05:37 PM
  #26  
Abe_Froman
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Originally Posted by robertorolfo View Post
Not sure nonsense like this is super safe in an urban setting. At least he has brakes, which plenty of them do without...

No handlebars or brakes while riding in traffic. Though the guy in this pic does have one, and we can count the chain as a second if he’s riding fixed gear.

But yea...no handlebars or no front break IS nonsense.
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Old 03-12-18, 06:05 PM
  #27  
Jim from Boston
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Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
There are accounts the bicycle was developed as a replacement for horse travel. Human propelled transportation seems to me the most reasonable explanation for why the bicycle developed and exactly what these commuters here are doing.
FYA, I had read this interesting factoid about the invention of the Bicycle, and here is a verification.
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
The first verifiable claim for a practically used bicycle belongs to German Baron Karl von Drais, a civil servant to the Grand Duke of Baden in Germany. Drais invented his Laufmaschine (German for "running machine") in 1817, that was called Draisine (English) or draisienne (French) by the press.

Karl von Drais patented this design in 1818, which was the first commercially successful two-wheeled, steerable, human-propelled machine, commonly called a velocipede, and nicknamed hobby-horse or dandy horse.It was initially manufactured in Germany and France.

Hans-Erhard Lessing (Drais' biographer) found from circumstantial evidence that Drais' interest in finding an alternative to the horse was the starvation and death of horses caused by crop failure in 1816, the Year Without a Summer following the volcanic eruption of Tambora in 1815).

On his first reported ride from Mannheim on June 12, 1817, he covered 13 km (eight miles) in less than an hour. Constructed almost entirely of wood, the draisine weighed 22 kg (48 pounds), had brass bushings within the wheel bearings, iron shod wheels, a rear-wheel brake and 152 mm (6 inches) of trail of the front-wheel for a self-centering caster effect.

[and]

The velocipede's renaissance began in Paris during the late 1860s. Its early history is complex and has been shrouded in some mystery, not least because of conflicting patent claims: all that has been stated for sure is that a French metalworker attached pedals to the front wheel; at present, the earliest year bicycle historians agree on is 1864.

The identity of the person who attached cranks is still an open question at International Cycling History Conferences (ICHC). The claims of Ernest Michaux and of Pierre Lallement, and the lesser claims of rear-pedaling Alexandre Lefebvre, have their supporters within the ICHC community.
The Southwest Corridor Bikepath in Boston is officially named for P. Lallement, who "died in obscurity in 1891 in Boston at the age of 47." (Wikipedia)

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Old 03-12-18, 08:35 PM
  #28  
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Are "true cyclists" the commuting equivalent of road "serious cyclists"?
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Old 03-13-18, 04:32 AM
  #29  
Chuck Naill
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Good point. I also notice that bike dogmatism creeps in even among commuters, such that you'll read posts in this forum declaring that you can't be a real commuter unless your bike has fenders and racks. When in fact, any bike that gets ridden to work is by definition a commuting bike and the ethos should be "do what works for you."



Yes, I find the dogmatism silly.


If you are using a bicycle to tour your local neighborhood on a Sunday afternoon, as fare as I am concerned, you are doing the same thing as someone coming from 500 miles away.


If you are enjoying a spirited ride using Strava, how can someone seriously say you are not a road cyclists?


If you are going to the grocery on your carbon fiber using a back pack to haul the beer back to watch March Madness, how are you not commuting?
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Old 03-13-18, 04:44 AM
  #30  
ptempel
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That’s a handsome compliment. I also give a thumbs up to anyone on two wheels. I have been using older race bikes for commuting. So you can indeed use any bike you like. There’s nothing like feeling great and fit. Cycle commuting gives me that.

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Old 03-13-18, 10:28 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
What exactly is the nonsense here?
Ride above 10mph with the insides of both hands in as far as they can go, practically touching the stem. Tell me how you feel about maneuvering at that speed. Maybe you get used to it, but I tried it for a few minutes last night and felt less than comfortable/safe.


Originally Posted by ptempel
I also give a thumbs up to anyone on two wheels. I have been using older race bikes for commuting. So you can indeed use any bike you like. There’s nothing like feeling great and fit. Cycle commuting gives me that.
I spent quite a few years with a motorcycle as my only means of transportation. No car, limited public transport, and not even a bicycle. It was never a serious thing, but the guys that would only ride their motorcycles on sunny, warm days definitely didn't seem to warrant the moniker of "real bikers." I was also commuting on a bike that was definitely not intended for that role, but it still did the job quite well and showed that most bikes can break out of their "category" and be versatile, at least as long as you are young enough to put up with occasional discomfort.
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Old 03-13-18, 12:18 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
No gears no problem. No gears OR brakes and I hold it against them.

It's just stupid. And increasingly common.
Wait, what? I thought that stopped being cool back in 2009. Someone's gotta tell these kids that bikes with no brakes and one gear are soooo last decade.

On that note, it always cracked me up when I'd see "broken fixies" (i.e. bikes with a single speed and freewheel) with one brake, or better, none at all.
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Old 03-13-18, 01:58 PM
  #33  
caloso
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Originally Posted by robertorolfo View Post
Ride above 10mph with the insides of both hands in as far as they can go, practically touching the stem. Tell me how you feel about maneuvering at that speed. Maybe you get used to it, but I tried it for a few minutes last night and felt less than comfortable/safe.


You mean like this?



As for the kid in the big picture, meh. It's fashion driven for most (emulating messengers, who have a functional need for squeezing through traffic), and it's probably uncomfortable for long rides since you've only got one hand position, but it doesn't seem particularly unsafe to me, especially if you've got a brake lever right there. You mostly steer a bike with your butt, rather than your hands.
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Old 03-13-18, 02:09 PM
  #34  
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I don't think OP was out to demean anyone. Thanks Chuck.
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Old 03-13-18, 07:12 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
You mean like this?



As for the kid in the big picture, meh. It's fashion driven for most (emulating messengers, who have a functional need for squeezing through traffic), and it's probably uncomfortable for long rides since you've only got one hand position, but it doesn't seem particularly unsafe to me, especially if you've got a brake lever right there. You mostly steer a bike with your butt, rather than your hands.
Yeah, just like a pro rider climbing on a closed course, during a race. Exactly the same as urban riding conditions. I'd also like to see him steering through heavy traffic, using mostly his butt.
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Old 03-14-18, 04:17 PM
  #36  
Chuck Naill
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Originally Posted by Tombaatar View Post
I don't think OP was out to demean anyone. Thanks Chuck.


Absolutely,
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Old 03-14-18, 06:55 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
i'm lucky i get to enjoy my commutes on bike. Delivery bike people have hard lives which i don't envy. We can save the badass labels for them.
+1
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Old 03-14-18, 07:00 PM
  #38  
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I get the Jones every time I see someone commuting... or riding in general. Alas, impossible to commute when I do outside sales call and drive an average of 100 miles per day.
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Old 03-14-18, 07:21 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by look566 rider View Post
I get the Jones every time I see someone commuting... or riding in general. Alas, impossible to commute when I do outside sales call and drive an average of 100 miles per day.
For sure. There are certain jobs in which you cannot commute by bike. Sales is one of those. I count myself fortunate that I have a job where I don't need to be travelling, nor do I have a strict dress code.
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