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Rigid Fork for 1998 Stumpjumper

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Rigid Fork for 1998 Stumpjumper

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Old 07-12-18, 04:18 PM
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Trekathlete
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Rigid Fork for 1998 Stumpjumper

If I can't sell my stumpjumper I am going to turn it into my commuter with roadish tires and a rigid fork. After a quick look on ebay I couldn't find a carbon fork for V-Brakes. Any ideas on where to look? I've never replaced a fork so this will be my first time any pitfalls I should know about? I guess there are different tube sizes so how would I measure that so I can be sure to get the correct size? Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
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Old 07-12-18, 05:35 PM
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Your steerer tube will either be a 1in r 1-1/8. Most likely 1-1/8 given you have front suspension. You'll also have to think about the geometry so make sure you get the right length of fork. Try to find a threadless fork ( I'm assuming the sus fork you have now is threadless) so it will make installation easier,parts-wise.
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Old 07-12-18, 09:08 PM
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Your steer tube is 1 ⅛. The tricky part is finding a fork that will approximate the fork length of the suspension fork you’re replacing and has the brake mounts you need. If you don’t get a fork with a similar over all length, a standard 26” front fork will be too short. Way too short. Your front end will be too low, head angle too steep and bottom bracket too low. Your seat tube angle will also get a bit steeper too. Measure the axle-to-crown and try to find something close. It doesn’t have to be exact. You have a better chance at winning the lottery than finding an exact matching length rigid fork for a 1998 Stumpjumper. The angles on those old MTBs are pretty slack, so if you find something that comes up only a little short it might be close enough.


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Old 07-12-18, 10:39 PM
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Thanks for your reply’s. I was hoping for a carbon fork for the weight but I am having difficulties finding one with studs for the V-brake. I am glad you guys suggested measuring the crown to the hub that is a great idea that I totally wouldn’t have thought about! I also thought maybe a new fork/shock with a lock out might be ok but prefer the rigid since I have a new mountain bike and will just be using this one as a commuter bike, so no need for suspension... Anyways I will keep looking and super appreciate your insite, super helpful, thanks!
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Old 07-12-18, 10:52 PM
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I had a circa 2000 Hardrock with a 80mm travel 1 1/8" threaded Suntour fork. I replaced it with the Big Dummy fork and converted to threadless. Did GAP and C&O on it. That fork definitely fits well there, and it has cantilever mounts. Here is the link to my thread: fork replacement, need help
I understand that the Big Dummy fork is the opposite of "lightweight" and it is not carbon
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Old 07-12-18, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by csport View Post
I had a circa 2000 Hardrock with a 80mm travel 1 1/8" threaded Suntour fork. I replaced it with the Big Dummy fork and converted to threadless. Did GAP and C&O on it. That fork definitely fits well there, and it has cantilever mounts. Here is the link to my thread: fork replacement, need help
I understand that the Big Dummy fork is the opposite of "lightweight" and it is not carbon
what is GAP and C&O?
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Old 07-13-18, 06:47 AM
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Check Surely, they have some good suspension corrected forks, though I don't remember the brake configurations. I am running an aluminum mosso fork (ebay) on my commuter. Thin stuff. I would not recommend them to a friend, they do visibly flex (at least my disc brake version). It has survived some pretty harsh road treatment, but eventually I am going to replace with a surly or salsa fork.
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Old 07-13-18, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto View Post
Your steer tube is 1 ⅛. The tricky part is finding a fork that will approximate the fork length of the suspension fork you’re replacing and has the brake mounts you need. If you don’t get a fork with a similar over all length, a standard 26” front fork will be too short. Way too short. Your front end will be too low, head angle too steep and bottom bracket too low. Your seat tube angle will also get a bit steeper too. Measure the axle-to-crown and try to find something close. It doesn’t have to be exact. You have a better chance at winning the lottery than finding an exact matching length rigid fork for a 1998 Stumpjumper. The angles on those old MTBs are pretty slack, so if you find something that comes up only a little short it might be close enough.


-Kedosto
This should be exactly what you are looking for. https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...rk-ns-rmf-base. Hrm, on second thought reading through the reviews it appears this is not suspension corrected as the description indicates. Probably not such a good option. Perhaps another option is a 29" carbon fork, you can build a 69er.

Last edited by danmyersmn; 07-13-18 at 07:04 AM. Reason: Updated Info
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Old 07-13-18, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by danmyersmn View Post
This should be exactly what you are looking for. https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...rk-ns-rmf-base. Hrm, on second thought reading through the reviews it appears this is not suspension corrected as the description indicates. Probably not such a good option. Perhaps another option is a 29" carbon fork, you can build a 69er.
Yeah, close but no cigar. People are apparently missing the first line of their description --

"The 385mm axle-to-crown height is just right for bikes that originally came with full rigid forks, or forks with less than 80mm of travel"

Most forks back then were 80 - 100mm travel. 385mm is not enough length. I can't recall off the top of my head, but the number is probably more like 465mm. The problem with trying to use a 29'er is that the brake bosses don't line up with the rim. He could go with a 29'er disc fork and run a 26" mechanical front disc and rear V brake. It's almost certain that any replacement will be shorter than the original axle-to-crown, but when you figure the original travel, minus the sag setting, getting something close should give him something rideable.

Happy hunting!

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Old 07-13-18, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Trekathlete View Post
what is GAP and C&O?

From the website Great Allegheny Passage & C&O Canal Trail Trail Maps, Businesses, Events, Mileage, and more

About the C&O Canal Trail
The C&O Canal Towpath trail runs 185 miles along the Potomac River, from Washington DC to Cumberland Maryland. These tools will help you plan your next cycling, hiking, running, or canoeing trip along the C&O Canal or the Great Allegheny Passage.

About the Great Allegheny Passage
The Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) trail runs 150 miles through the heart of Pennsylvania, from the Point Park in downtown Pittsburgh to Cumberland Maryland. There it connects to the 185 mile long C&O Canal Trail.
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Old 07-13-18, 08:36 AM
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Yea the main reason I am trying to not go 29er or disc is because then I’d have to get more parts like a new wheel and all the components for a disc brake. I want to try and keep it simple. I found some UK company that sells forks at different sizes and I might give them a go... They are called exotic cycles or something like
that. I just need to measure my fork and sag and go from there! Thanks for your inputs!
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Old 07-13-18, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Trekathlete View Post
what is GAP and C&O?
Great Allegheny Passage and C&O Canal towpath, gravel/dirt trails from Pittsburgh to Washington, DC.
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Old 07-17-18, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto View Post
Most forks back then were 80 - 100mm travel. 385mm is not enough length.
That is incorrect. My 1998 Stumpjumper Pro came with an 80mm Manitou SX. 80mm was about the top of fork travel for that era. 100mm forks were still about 5 years in the future.

I don't disagree that the Nashbar fork is a bit short, however.

Originally Posted by Trekathlete View Post
If I can't sell my stumpjumper I am going to turn it into my commuter with roadish tires and a rigid fork. After a quick look on ebay I couldn't find a carbon fork for V-Brakes. Any ideas on where to look? I've never replaced a fork so this will be my first time any pitfalls I should know about? I guess there are different tube sizes so how would I measure that so I can be sure to get the correct size? Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
I don't think you looked hard enough. This one is a lot cheaper than the Nashbar fork. It's longer as well which won't hurt.
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Old 07-17-18, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I don't think you looked hard enough.
I'd agree.
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
This one is a lot cheaper than the Nashbar fork. It's longer as well which won't hurt.
Just for the sake of completeness: please also read my post from above in this context. A Surely Troll fork would likely work: https://surlybikes.com/parts/forks/troll_fork

@cyccommute: have you tried Mosso yourself? If so, what are your thoughts? (maybe PM, if too off-topic).
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Old 07-17-18, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by alias5000 View Post

@cyccommute: have you tried Mosso yourself? If so, what are your thoughts? (maybe PM, if too off-topic).
No I haven’t. I was considering it for a mountain bike my wife has but other solutions presented themselves. Small bikes are rare but every once in a while one shows up at my co-op.
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Old 07-17-18, 08:46 PM
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I saw the Mosso fork on eBay but I was really hoping for a carbon fork... but I have a few people looking at the bike to buy it so I might hold off on the fork for now... we’ll see though. It would be a perfect commuter for me so maybe if I don’t sell it I will convert it. I was going to sell pretty much all my bikes for one of the new gravel bikes out there but we’ll see....
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