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Headlight Washout

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Old 01-31-19, 06:58 PM
  #51  
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pineal gland? you cannot sleep in your house when the light is not to your liking? don't you have curtains to close?
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Old 02-01-19, 02:10 AM
  #52  
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If you canít see to ride your bicycle at 10mph, imagine how bad it is when youíre driving a 2 ton 7 ft wide car at 75mph
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Old 02-01-19, 06:13 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
pineal gland? you cannot sleep in your house when the light is not to your liking? don't you have curtains to close?
sure. not with my house, but on some houses, the street lamp is directly at the window and is very difficult to block out.

like this:

https://www.google.com/maps/@50.7903...7i16384!8i8192

that's what £225K / $300k gets you over here.
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Old 02-01-19, 10:00 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
sure. Not with my house, but on some houses, the street lamp is directly at the window and is very difficult to block out.

Like this:

https://www.google.com/maps/@50.7903...7i16384!8i8192

that's what £225k / $300k gets you over here.
nice!
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Old 02-01-19, 10:08 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by davei1980 View Post
nice!
Maybe I'm slightly high on the price with the Brexit stagnation and all.

https://www.zoopla.co.uk/property-hi...4-0eu/42608119
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Old 02-01-19, 10:43 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by davei1980 View Post
It's dark on my commute both directions so I rely heavily on my headlight this time of year.

Most of my commute is on a dedicated bike lane next to a two-lane road. When it's really dark, the headlights from oncoming traffic wash out my headlight and I can't see anything until they pass. There are very few street lights to mitigate this problem.

Any suggestions?
are the cars coming up behind you and washing the light out or coming at you? i have had good luck with cygolite for bike lights. I have 850 lumens and want to upgrade to the 1100 lumens light.

i think cars headlights have gotten brighter as well. if you are using AA batteries you should probably consider a light that is usb rechargeable.
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Old 02-01-19, 10:46 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Wearing a brimmed cycling cap you might avoid being dazzled by the oncoming headlight, and so still able to see where you are going..
The plan ; just drop your head, lower your view the cap brim will block the lights so you can see again after they pass..
now back to the home shopping channel...
zactly! the problem isn't lack of illumination, it's being blinded. I would suggest a helmet with a visor so that the OP can look down at the pavement without being blinded, or a cycling cap which has a bigger brim. gotta stay away from the shopping channel, got a problem ...;-)
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Old 02-01-19, 11:29 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by davei1980 View Post
Ok sorry I didn't know there was an electronics forum! Commuters are my peeps so I post nearly everything here (including a thread about whether or not to wear standard underwear under your lycra pants, watch for that one soon!)
There is, and you'll find everything from zealots preaching the wonders of dim dynamo lights to people who can actually see where they are going.
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Old 02-01-19, 11:34 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
There is, and you'll find everything from zealots preaching the wonders of dim dynamo lights to people who can actually see where they are going.
It's not a dim dynamo light, it's the horrible infrastructure that you ride upon.

I should've guessed that E Wa was in the US and not participated in this discussion.
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Old 02-01-19, 11:35 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
no.
Originally Posted by Spoonrobot View Post
Lumens aren't going to make a difference if they're not directed properly. Throw/Lux is more important than overall brightness.
Interesting that you 2 think less light is going to be better. While reality doesn't work that way, I'm sure you'll enlighten us (pun intended) as to how that's going to help.
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Old 02-01-19, 11:49 AM
  #61  
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FWIW ~ I use an original Magicshine w/ a wide angle diffuser & I added a beam cutoff hood (so I don't blind "them"). seems to do pretty well even w oncoming traffic



however, past cpl months been riding off road. took the beam cutoff hood off. when aimed higher it's great off road.



but at perpendicular traffic (riding to the trails) it's pretty formidable


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Old 02-01-19, 12:23 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by davei1980 View Post
I just got back from a business trip in Humboldt Co. Beautiful area you got down there.

I was in the south part of the county, Garberville, though.
Cool. It's beautiful here on Humboldt Bay; it's all flat, surrounded by the Trinity Alps, or at least their foothills, so you can pick your terrain. Lots of hiking, cycling, mtb, kayaking, and more artists per square foot than I've ever seen.
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Old 02-01-19, 12:24 PM
  #63  
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I’ve found the worst situation is where the bike lane or path is below the grade of the road, there is no overhead lighting, and you are on the same side of the road as oncoming traffic. The light from cars in your eyes, the shadow on the ground in front of you, and oncoming bikes on the left make it nearly impossible to see. This is where really bright lights help the most. Adding rain and twists and turns to the path make it even more difficult.
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Old 02-01-19, 12:52 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Iíve found the worst situation is where the bike lane or path is below the grade of the road, there is no overhead lighting, and you are on the same side of the road as oncoming traffic. The light from cars in your eyes, the shadow on the ground in front of you, and oncoming bikes on the left make it nearly impossible to see. This is where really bright lights help the most. Adding rain and twists and turns to the path make it even more difficult.
This is where I am at exactly except there is a lane of same-direction traffic between me and the oncoming traffic.

The tricky part is berms of snow and pine needles collect in the bike lane, making the rideable area that much narrower as well. My commute times jump up when it's warmer, I bet, because I am not as tentative!
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Old 02-01-19, 01:49 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I take all the visors off of my bike helmets.

I ride drop bars, and I discovered that I tended to look up, and the visors were restricting my field of view (in the daylight).
You said ' helmet visors ', I did not..

Traditional Bike caps cleverly let you flip up the brim for those occasions ... + you can wear them under your helmet..




...
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Old 02-01-19, 03:59 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Iíve found the worst situation is where the bike lane or path is below the grade of the road, there is no overhead lighting, and you are on the same side of the road as oncoming traffic. The light from cars in your eyes, the shadow on the ground in front of you, and oncoming bikes on the left make it nearly impossible to see. This is where really bright lights help the most. Adding rain and twists and turns to the path make it even more difficult.
Part of my trip home involves a short uphill section with bumps and some small curves that's across a busy street from an apartment complex that has a security light that shines into my eyes. I've used different lights over the years including a Magicshine with the wide angle lens and the only thing that works there is more lumens.
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Old 02-01-19, 04:13 PM
  #67  
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You getting out the Skidoo for the arctic weather, there?
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Old 02-01-19, 04:20 PM
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I added a little tab to the front of my helmet so the tab drops down over my left eye. It stays out of the way above the eye unless I lower my head and turn it to the right a little, then it blocks really bright light coming from that side. It works pretty well for most cases I run across, which is cars coming from the opposite direction on two-lane roads. It also did OK for sunset yesterday when the sun was peaking out from under the cloud deck and spearing me in the eye. It's better than not having it. It wouldn't do as well on a four-lane road or with a long line of on-coming traffic when on a bike path because then the light wouldn't be a point source and would be more spread out.


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Old 02-02-19, 09:51 AM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
You getting out the Skidoo for the arctic weather, there?
I stayed indoors for most of it - too cold for me.
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Old 02-02-19, 11:41 AM
  #70  
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
If that's a true 1500 lumens, I'd say that's a plenty bright light and HTFU, learn to look away from oncoming headlights.
OK I have to amend my previous answer.

My headlight is the same as this (I don't believe the claimed 2000 lumen rating), and I usually run it on medium, aimed so I get an ellipse on the ground with a size and position that shows me as much as I need to see, and it works great.

But last night I was riding on a mup that was on the 'left' side of the road so I was against traffic. The mup is even elevated 5-10ft above the road, so in theory car headlights should not be an issue, but I was seriously blinded. It was a problem, because that path in particular is riddled with sharp bumps from tree roots that you need to watch out for, or they could potentially throw you.

I found if I put my light on high instead of just medium, and also tilted my head to block out some headlight glare with my helmet visor, vision was acceptable.

I was only on that mup last night because I took a different route than usual, for the sake of variety. I will avoid that route at night in the future
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Old 02-03-19, 02:33 AM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
Interesting that you 2 think less light is going to be better. While reality doesn't work that way, I'm sure you'll enlighten us (pun intended) as to how that's going to help.
I apologise and have forgotten that you don't have dedicate infrastructure where you don't ride into on coming headlights like we do.

Thus, I'll rephrase, where people have adequate structure, minimum being segregated cycleways in the same direction of traffic, a proper StVZO-approved headlight is optimal.

If you're riding under less adequate conditions, blazing everything in front of you might be useful.

Also, you need to adjust your tone with me, should you ever want a response again.
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Old 02-03-19, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
I apologise and have forgotten that you don't have dedicate infrastructure where you don't ride into on coming headlights like we do.

Thus, I'll rephrase, where people have adequate structure, minimum being segregated cycleways in the same direction of traffic, a proper StVZO-approved headlight is optimal.
Really? Europe has lights everywhere that are bright enough so that you donít need bicycle lights? Or do your cities have so few lights that a dim light isnít washed out by other light sources?

Your arguments just donít hold water. There is as many light sources in large cities in Europe as there are in the US. Youíve made the same illogical leap that many people make in that you think you need less light in cities than out in the sticks. The opposite is actually true. Count the number of light sources within eyesight of you some time at night and then think about competing with all those lights. A dim light designed to annoy no one gets lost in the sea of light youíll find in every city on the planet. A StVZO light isnít optimal.

If you're riding under less adequate conditions, blazing everything in front of you might be useful.
Confusing drivers as to what is coming at them goes a long way towards increasing a bicyclist safety. Surprising them (because they canít tell you are there) doesnít usually end well. Having a ďpolite lightĒ...ĒExcuse me, sir but Iím over hereĒ...may be nice but ďpoliteĒ be damned when it comes to personal safety.

Also, you need to adjust your tone with me, should you ever want a response again.
Really? You run down an entire nation and you want civility towards you? Log in your eye, maybe?
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Old 02-03-19, 01:43 PM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by davei1980 View Post
1,500 lumens; uses 3 AA batts.

Mom bought it for me for xmas at Dicks.

Pretty cheap to get a USB rechargeable light with 2,400 lumens, like under ~$30... seriously considering....
There are lights that just straight up lie about their lumen ratings. It sound like that's what you are running into. A 4AA battery light typically gets you around 200 lumens. Frankly...I wish this wasn't the case, but no AA battery lights are going to be bright enough to overcome oncoming headlights with streetlights.

I bought my brother the Fenix BC30R ($130)
https://www.fenixlighting.com/produc...ix-bike-light/

If that's to expensive you could buy a niterider 1000 for $60:
https://www.amazon.com/NiteRider-Rec...dp/B07DG9MXFN/

That's the lowest I would recommend going. A "1500 lumen" light that runs off 3 AA's is simply lying about it's lumen capacity.

If you wanted to throw an endless amount of money at the problem a Lupine makes a 900 lumen shaped beam light with high mode and a very nice led for $600:
https://www.lupinenorthamerica.com/S...Bike_Light.asp

But that would be rediculous for your needs. You be able to see substantially better with a 1,000 lumen Niterider light compared you have now, for $60 or so.

Last edited by PaulRivers; 02-03-19 at 05:17 PM.
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Old 02-03-19, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
There are lights that just straight up lie about their lumen ratings. It sound like that's what you are running into. A 4AA battery light typically gets you around 200 lumens. Frankly...I wish this wasn't the case, but no AA battery lights are going to be bright enough to overcome oncoming headlights with streetlights.

I bought my brother the Fenix BC30R ($130)
https://www.fenixlighting.com/produc...ix-bike-light/

If that's to expensive you could buy a niterider 1000 for $60:
https://www.amazon.com/NiteRider-Rec...dp/B07DG9MXFN/

That's the lowest I would recommend going. A "1500 lumen" light that runs off 3 AA's is simply lying about it's lumen capacity.

If you wanted to throw an endless amount of money at the problem a Lupine makes a 900 lumen shaped beam light with high mode and a very nice led for $600:
https://www.lupinenorthamerica.com/S...Bike_Light.asp

But that would be rediculous for your needs. You be able to see substantially better with a 1,000 lumen Niterider light compared you have now, for $60 or so.
Thanks for all the info! After giving this one a day in court (thanks Mom!) I think it's going to get relegated to duty on my weekend rec bike and my commuter will get one of these rechargeable options (or a dynamo someday!)
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Old 02-03-19, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
Interesting that you 2 think less light is going to be better. While reality doesn't work that way, I'm sure you'll enlighten us (pun intended) as to how that's going to help.
Obvious low information poster. I never said any such thing, read it again:

Originally Posted by Spoonrobot
Lumens aren't going to make a difference if they're not directed properly. Throw/Lux is more important than overall brightness.
Then, educate yourself: ANSI FL1 Standard - LED-Resource
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