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Flats!!!!!

Old 02-06-19, 12:54 PM
  #1  
liampboyle
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Flats!!!!!

So yesterday before I leave for work I top off both my tires. They take 45-65 psi and I inflated both to 60 psi. Everything was fine on my ride in, I get five minutes into my ride home and notice both tires have gone flat (front is just too low too ride on back is truly flat). The end result us my having to walk five miles home.

I just replaced my worn out tires with these about two weeks ago: Schwinn Bike Replacement Tire...
and they're paired with Schwinn self-sealing tubes.

Now, I still need to see exactly what caused this set of flats. (I was seriously too frustrated last night to deal with it by the time I got home.) But what's everybody's advice on a decent "Iron tire" type setup? Also, would going tubeless help prevent the near constant flats of commute city riding?

Last edited by liampboyle; 02-06-19 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:20 PM
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Likely just coincidence that they both went flat at the same time, or maybe your ran over sharp debris both front and back. Either way, sucks.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:26 PM
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I'm thinking coincidence (lose valve core on one, and possible cat involvement on the other - our new kitten thinks my tires make a good scratching post) but this has me thinking that tubeless conversion might not be a bad idea.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:30 PM
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Continental makes some urban tires with several protective layers, like the City Ride. Heavy though, and not particularly fast, but great flat protection:



I think you really owe it to yourself though to figure out what caused the other tires to go flat. It could have been something as simple as pinched inner tubes. Or it might be glass, tacks, goat heads, or who knows what?

I like to sit under a nice bright light and feel the inside of the tire where it contacts the tube, checking for anything poking through. Then use a knife blade and tweezers to completely remove it like you would a sliver in your finger. Once you figure out exactly what caused the flats, you'll have a much better chance of avoiding future ones, otherwise you're just throwing money around trying different tires and tubes.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:34 PM
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I do need to figure that out. I'll take a close inspection tonight after I get home. I just get really frustrated when I end up walking.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:37 PM
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Budget aside, I’d avoid anything accessories wise that bear the “Schwinn” brand. It’s all brand x stuff licenced to use the brand name. The sealant in the tubes is bad for wheel balance, and can leak out of/clog the valves. Has happened to me.

I can confidently recommend these:
https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...-tires/contact


- Andy

Last edited by TransitBiker; 02-06-19 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:45 PM
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I usually put the minimum required psi into a tire. I almost never get a flat tire. And I always use cheap tires like Kenda and Chenshin and other no-brand tires.

Here's my theory...which I learned from my motobike days...I was taught by enduro riders that max psi gets more flat tires...the logic was the moto tire that softer (less air)...will more likely flex more and allow nails and other sharp stuff some chance to deflect away from the tire...a nail will punch into a stiffer (more air) tire because it is stubborn won't give any chance for the nail to find a way away.

Last edited by mtb_addict; 02-06-19 at 01:54 PM.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:51 PM
  #8  
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Steps to eliminating the problem:
  1. Find the source; where it is leaking.
  2. Identify what part of the wheel and/or tire was adjacent to the hole in the tube.
  3. Feel around inside the tire and wheel for something sharp. If it's the tire, you may feel glass or a goat head sticking through. If it is the wheel, you may find worn-through rim tape, or a spec of metal debris, or no rim tape at all, or a rough spot near the valve hole.
  4. Rectify the source of the problem -- remove the goathead thorn, or the glass. File off the rough spot inside the wheel. Install fresh rim tape. Those sorts of remedies.
  5. Patch (or replace) the tube.
  6. Re-mount the tube and tires. Pay careful attention to not pinching the tube between the tire and the rim, or slicing it with tire levers.
  7. Re-fill the tires with air.
  8. Ride
Since it happened to both tires, one of the following probably happened:

You rode through a bunch of goathead thorns.
You rode through a bunch of glass.
Your tubes were old, with deteriorating rubber. (When this happens you often get failures at the valve stem or along a seam.)
Your rim tape is too old.
Your rims are both damaged in the same way.
Your weight and load was too much for the width and tire pressure used (pinch flat)

I've had tubes fail catastrophically at the stem, brand new. Riding along and suddenly "poof." I've had them become punctured because rim tape wasn't providing adequate protection. I've seen them punctured by getting pinched while installing really difficult tires. I've had as many as five goat heads on one ride. I've had glass cause a flat. I never have had a pinch flat, except when I wrecked and destroyed the rim too. But they can happen if you run your tires close to minimum pressure for your weight and tire width. All of these things *can* happen to both tires on the same ride, on a bad day.

Find the problem, fix, ride.
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Old 02-06-19, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by TransitBiker View Post
Budget aside, I’d avoid anything accessories wise that bear the “Schwinn” brand. It’s all brand x stuff licenced to use the brand name. The sealant in the tubes is bad for wheel balance, and can leak out of/clog the valves. Has happened to me.

What exact model tires are these? 65 psi sounds like a fatter tire? There are higher quality 2.5 inch width tires that can be filled to 80 psi. Much lower rolling resistance in general. Without knowing exact model & sizes, I can’t really make any product suggestions or recommendations. My bike has a 2.5 tire on front, and because it’s rated to 55 lbs on the rear rack, I got a 2.75 inch tire on back. That one gets 58 psi max, and the portly profile really helps with shock absorption with a loaded rack. Also helps keep drive traction on the road when cornering - wider contact patch.

- Andy
They're 26 x 1.95 - the bike is from '95 and I think these are still the original rims.

Last edited by liampboyle; 02-06-19 at 02:08 PM.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:00 PM
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wow...that is very wide to commute on...it must be very tireing.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by liampboyle View Post
They're 26 x 2.95 - the bike is from '95 and I think these are still the original rims.
I couudht get the link to work. Updated my post. To find leak, use soapy water & put pressure in.

to summarise... my recommendation:

https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...-tires/contact

- Andy
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Old 02-06-19, 02:01 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
Steps to eliminating the problem:
  1. Find the source; where it is leaking.
  2. Identify what part of the wheel and/or tire was adjacent to the hole in the tube.
  3. Feel around inside the tire and wheel for something sharp. If it's the tire, you may feel glass or a goat head sticking through. If it is the wheel, you may find worn-through rim tape, or a spec of metal debris, or no rim tape at all, or a rough spot near the valve hole.
  4. Rectify the source of the problem -- remove the goathead thorn, or the glass. File off the rough spot inside the wheel. Install fresh rim tape. Those sorts of remedies.
  5. Patch (or replace) the tube.
  6. Re-mount the tube and tires. Pay careful attention to not pinching the tube between the tire and the rim, or slicing it with tire levers.
  7. Re-fill the tires with air.
  8. Ride
Since it happened to both tires, one of the following probably happened:

You rode through a bunch of goathead thorns.
You rode through a bunch of glass.
Your tubes were old, with deteriorating rubber. (When this happens you often get failures at the valve stem or along a seam.)
Your rim tape is too old.
Your rims are both damaged in the same way.
Your weight and load was too much for the width and tire pressure used (pinch flat)

I've had tubes fail catastrophically at the stem, brand new. Riding along and suddenly "poof." I've had them become punctured because rim tape wasn't providing adequate protection. I've seen them punctured by getting pinched while installing really difficult tires. I've had as many as five goat heads on one ride. I've had glass cause a flat. I never have had a pinch flat, except when I wrecked and destroyed the rim too. But they can happen if you run your tires close to minimum pressure for your weight and tire width. All of these things *can* happen to both tires on the same ride, on a bad day.

Find the problem, fix, ride.
We don't have goathead thorns in this area but broken glass is a near constant for me, I also have multiple construction zones I've been dealing with the past few months.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:08 PM
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I'd rather sit on the sidewalk 15 - 30 min. & change 2 tubes or patch small punctures before walking 5 miles. I know changing tubes or patching small punctures out in the field stinks, but it's not as bad as walking 5 miles

also, maybe you just had a leak? do you carry a pump or CO2 so that you can limp home & do the changeover later? meaning pump, ride, pump, ride etc ...? sometimes it's an option

fwiw ~ someone once suggested using a cotton ball to slide around the inside of the tire to find the small perpetrator

good luck!

p.s. maybe a smooth tread tire would be less likely to pick up something that can puncture the tires
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Old 02-06-19, 02:09 PM
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Damnit I typo'ed 26" x 1.95" I not riding a fatbike
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Old 02-06-19, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
I'd rather sit on the sidewalk 15 - 30 min. & change 2 tubes or patch small punctures before walking 5 miles.
So would I but it was already dark out, and there aren't any really good spots for that on my route. I do normally carry a frame pump, spare tube, and patch kit but the pump is broken and needs replaced.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:19 PM
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This in the one I use on the rear wheel. I have legit run over broken bottles and auto glass shards & no puncture. In fact, before I changed to this tire, in 6 months I got 3 flats. 5 years later on this same tire, no problems. Both models have that reflective strip, which very much saved my butt several times.

https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...s/contact-plus

Tell me, what local resources do you have? I have access to 4 bike shops, two with outstanding service departments.

- Andy
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Old 02-06-19, 02:39 PM
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I definitely don't work for Vittoria or profit from sales of their products in any way, and I hesitate to write this for fear of jinxing it, but ever since I started using some of their G+ (graphene) branded products, I haven't had a flat yet. I'm mostly riding in Manhattan, which is about as urban as it gets, but also a fair bit in Queens, and both areas have plenty of construction going on. I know I'm just one person and miles away from a significant sample size, but I think their stuff is pretty good.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:46 PM
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Two local bike shops directly on my route, and the one, Middletown Cycling, is who I normally go to for repairs (Ross gives me priority since the bicycle is my "primary mode"). I should ask them about getting some of those continentals.
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Old 02-06-19, 03:27 PM
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Flat resistence cannot have yur cake and eat it too.

The price for anti puncture tire:
  • less "road feel"
  • heavier
  • more rolling resistence

Last edited by mtb_addict; 02-06-19 at 03:30 PM.
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Old 02-06-19, 03:35 PM
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Schwalbe Marathons = no flats (well OK, hardly any). Little heavy, but roll well, last forever and have reflective stripes.
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Old 02-06-19, 04:25 PM
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Had Conti Travel Contacts on a Trekking bike when I got it 26 x 1.75 rolled nice, slick center band.. gatorskin mesh reinforced casing too..
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Old 02-06-19, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by liampboyle View Post
So would I but it was already dark out, and there aren't any really good spots for that on my route. I do normally carry a frame pump, spare tube, and patch kit but the pump is broken and needs replaced.
What is wrong with the pump? Sometimes it is as simple as greasing the plunger, although I'e also broken pump heads, or worn out parts.
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Old 02-06-19, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
What is wrong with the pump? Sometimes it is as simple as greasing the plunger, although I'e also broken pump heads, or worn out parts.
My son cracked the body of it.

Anyway, I think I found the culprits, VALVE CORES!!!! The cores in the Schrade valves, the one in the front wheel was loose as I had suspected, and the back tire just had a straight bad valve core, I replaced it with a spare I had and no more hissing air under pressure.
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Old 02-06-19, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
wow...that is very wide to commute on...it must be very tireing.
Pun intended?

But still, the idea that wider tires are slower is a misconception from long ago. Of course tires can vary in a number of ways, but a broad generalization is that among tires of similar tread and construction, wider tires actually have less rolling resistance at a given pressure because they deflect less under load. Many people, including myself, who swore that "skinny tires are fast" have discovered the pleasure of riding on wider tires.

As an alternative to having lower rolling resistance, wider tires can also be run at lower pressure for the same rolling resistance, resulting in a more comfortable ride.

So for instance where I might once have insisted on riding 25mm tires at 100 psi, today I ride my longest distances on 38mm tires at 60 psi, and I'm convinced they're my fastest tires ever.
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Old 02-06-19, 08:29 PM
  #25  
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Whatever the cause, flat tires happen in a somewhat random manner. You can have ten in a week .You can have two in a year. There may be an explanation, or not .Do the due diligence and find the cause if you can, but if you can't, carry on . Get good at fixing them and they will cease to be an issue.
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