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Anyone use these solid-core/no-inner-tube tires?

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Anyone use these solid-core/no-inner-tube tires?

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Old 11-02-04, 11:31 AM
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mwbirren
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Anyone use these solid-core/no-inner-tube tires?

I was at a local auto tire store yesterday and saw this display for solid-core/no-inner-tube tires (for wheelbarrows and such), but noticed they are offering them for bicycles.
Here's the link:
http://www.marathontires.com/

Anyone have any experience with these?

Thanks,
MikeB
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Old 11-02-04, 12:00 PM
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Only when I wanna lose a filling or two.
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Old 11-02-04, 12:21 PM
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I have tried a couple of Greentyres which are similar. The size that was described as a 23mm 100 psi equivalent was ok except, as Dobber suggests, it is a bit of a hard ride. When that one wore down I tried a wider version, either 32 or 35 mm, 85 psi equivalent. The first ride I thought my legs were really tired. During the second one I realized it wasn't my legs but the tire. Picture feeling like you are riding on rain-softened ground or pedalling up a slight incline - all the time. No momentum at all, just constant effort. I snatched it off after that second ride and probably threw it away. Makes me shudder just thinking about it. As I said, though, the narrower, firmer one was tolerable. I just decided I could manage almost as well with thorn-resistant tubes, Tuffy liners, and kevlar belted tires.
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Old 11-02-04, 03:34 PM
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Yeah, word. I tried Greentyres and it really took me back to the good old days of iron-rimmed bicycles with wheels wrapped in strips of leather. Not comfortable.
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Old 11-02-04, 04:16 PM
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I have not tried them.
Somebody on the Icebike list did try them, and remarked that the Airfree tires are made of some non-rubber elastomer and have zero traction in rain and snow. That is to say: these tires are only for fair weather.

I've gone about 2,000 puncture-free miles on my Schwalbe Marathon Plus this year -- why should I give up the well-documented virtues of pneumatic tires when I already have had a puncture free year?

The idea of a tire that will never flat is appealing, but there are less drastic ways to approach that goal.

Paul
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Old 11-03-04, 05:26 AM
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What RainmanP said. I had solid tyres for a while and they're really not worth it. HARD riding, wear down quickly, and work out more expensive than pneumatic tubes anyway.
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Old 11-03-04, 12:13 PM
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I used something similar when I was a kid. I lived in El Paso, Tx then and I guess my parents got tired of fixing my flats. Dont remember details but I never got a flat after that...
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Old 11-03-04, 02:13 PM
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Caution many flat-proofs do not handle well in the rain at even at medium and low speeds. Handle-well = hard falls due to loss of traction.

Brands I have tried, Gr##nTire, A#rFree. Proceed at your own risk.
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Old 11-04-04, 11:59 AM
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If you're having problems with flats, try riding only on clean pavement. Avoid areas where any sand or fine gravel has accumulated, because that's where you'll also find glass and other sharpies.
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Old 11-04-04, 01:26 PM
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If you're having problems with flats, try riding only on clean pavement. Avoid areas where any sand or fine gravel has accumulated, because that's where you'll also find glass and other sharpies.
I'm a little puzzled by this answer. As people that ride for transportation, we don't have very much control over whether we ride on dirty pavement. I try to ride a little to the left of most of the debris on the road is, but on a 50mph road I try to make it easy for cars to pass me, too, so that they don't squish me while I'm avoiding small amounts of debris on the shoulder that they can't see. meaning: lots of debris, I avoid. little bits of debris, I don't swerve towards traffic to avoid because I don't want to get hit.
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Old 11-04-04, 02:48 PM
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I've seen the airless tires and tire tube (solid foam) inserts used for another application, and that is for horse drawn show/pleasure carts. Although cart wheels are spoked the construction is a bit different. Generaly the cheaper ones do not use the traditional nippled spokes. However the probelm arises with wheel strength when used with airless tires or the foam airless tubes. A rim with a properly inflated pneumatic tire will withstand far more abuse (potholes, tight turns, uneven terrain, etc) far better and without warping than one equipped with with the airless type. For this reason I would be suspect of using the airless stuff on any of my bikes. Just my 2 cents worth of experience using spoked wheels in another application.

'bent Brian
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Old 11-04-04, 10:38 PM
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[looks around for vl*d, and then quietly tiptoes away.]
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Old 11-04-04, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by UncaStuart
[looks around for vl*d, and then quietly tiptoes away.]
You remember that clown too eh?
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Old 11-05-04, 05:04 AM
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Thx for the feedback, I was a little skeptical (felt the ride might be different too). I've had pretty good luck with the puncture resistant tires (watch, now that I've said that I'll probably have a flat! ).

who is Vl*d?

MikeB
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Old 11-11-04, 08:14 PM
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I've been using Greentyres for the last couple of years, and I'm ready to go back to pneumatics. I really, really liked not having to worry about broken glass, and never having to top off my tires, and even the higher rolling resistance gave me some extra exercise, which I need.

Here, however, are the two reasons I'm giving up on them, in order of importance:

1) They really have a lot less shock absorption than pneumatics, which has led to several broken spokes over the years (I weigh about 220 pounds). Flat tires are a hassle, but broken spokes are a much bigger hassle.

2) They turn a fun ride into a long slog, and it's really hard to keep up with friends on social rides. I'm ready to get a little less exercise, and have a little more fun.

So, now that I'm re-entering the world of pneumatics, what's my best choice of tire, tube, goop, and/or liners to avoid flats? There must be a whole topic on that in here somewhere...
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Old 11-11-04, 08:33 PM
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I used those hard foam innertubes many years ago. I have nothing good to say about them. I will say, however, that those Bell "Flatblocker" tires and tubes they sell everywhere DO work, though.They're basically extra thick tires and innertubes. It's a HUGE weight penalty, but if it's your beater, commuter, kid's bike, etc. It will definitely block flats.
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