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On Paraffin Wax...

Old 09-28-12, 02:43 PM
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On Paraffin Wax...

New to this forum thought I'd share my method of paraffin waxing my chain. First I clean my brand new chain once to remove all the oil of course. After that and for the rest of the chain's life I simply dip my chain into a bath of hot paraffin wax (common cheap wax purchased at local grocery store) every 200 miles.

I think my process is unique because I wax without splitting the chain and the whole process takes about 5 minutes. Simply place a small 4" tall pot of melted wax under your bike near the rear wheel. Shift to the 2nd smallest cassette cog and then remove the chain from the smallest inner crankset ring. With your left hand create a large amount of slack in the chain by tweaking the derailleur cage. This should allow about 7 chain links to drape into the pot of melted wax. Leave those 7 links in the hot wax for about 10 FULL seconds--you want the hot wax heat the draped section of chain's metal enough to melt away all the old wax. Then simply move the chain forward to the next section of seven links making sure the exiting links are clean and shiny with fresh hot wax. If you see a white clumpy wax build-up you didn't leave the chain in the wax long enough to melt away the old wax.

When the chain is completely waxed around, quickly install the chain on the smallest crankset ring and allow to cool. The chain should be very stiff and perfectly clean. The chain will loosen up after only a few pedal revolutions.
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Old 09-28-12, 02:54 PM
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I have always liked the clean look of waxed chains that I see in pictures, but I would be doing that every week using 200 mile intervals. I don't clean my chains at anywhere close to that frequency. I just add some more lube and maybe wipe them down. They come off the bikes and get a mineral spirit bath every once in a while (every 2 or 3 months). They get replaced every year or two. The waxing process just seems like too much added work for my purposes.
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Old 09-28-12, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Alupang
New to this forum thought I'd share my method of paraffin waxing my chain. First I clean my brand new chain once to remove all the oil of course. After that and for the rest of the chain's life I simply dip my chain into a bath of hot paraffin wax (common cheap wax purchased at local grocery store) every 200 miles.

I think my process is unique because I wax without splitting the chain and the whole process takes about 5 minutes. Simply place a small 4" tall pot of melted wax under your bike near the rear wheel. Shift to the 2nd smallest cassette cog and then remove the chain from the smallest inner crankset ring. With your left hand create a large amount of slack in the chain by tweaking the derailleur cage. This should allow about 7 chain links to drape into the pot of melted wax. Leave those 7 links in the hot wax for about 10 FULL seconds--you want the hot wax heat the draped section of chain's metal enough to melt away all the old wax. Then simply move the chain forward to the next section of seven links making sure the exiting links are clean and shiny with fresh hot wax. If you see a white clumpy wax build-up you didn't leave the chain in the wax long enough to melt away the old wax.

When the chain is completely waxed around, quickly install the chain on the smallest crankset ring and allow to cool. The chain should be very stiff and perfectly clean. The chain will loosen up after only a few pedal revolutions.
Very interesting. Would be cool to see pics or a video.
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Old 09-28-12, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by hubcap
I have always liked the clean look of waxed chains that I see in pictures, but I would be doing that every week using 200 mile intervals. I don't clean my chains at anywhere close to that frequency. I just add some more lube and maybe wipe them down. They come off the bikes and get a mineral spirit bath every once in a while (every 2 or 3 months). They get replaced every year or two. The waxing process just seems like too much added work for my purposes.
The benefit is I don't ever clean my chain and there is never any black oil/gunk on the chain, pullys or cassette (and my clothes). I quick 5 minute dip into fresh wax once a week and you're good to go for the entire 200 mile week--about the same time as wiping down a dirty oily chain and reapplying lube you think?

Once you get the process down it's less work overall I believe. Again I can wax my chain about as fast as I can wipe it down and reapply lube. Simply wiping down a dirty oiled chain does not remove the grit between links and rollers...
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Old 09-28-12, 04:18 PM
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The wax method has a cleanliness appeal, for sure. How long do your chains last before they stretch to 12-1/16", though, Alupang?
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Old 09-28-12, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
The wax method has a cleanliness appeal, for sure. How long do your chains last before they stretch to 12-1/16", though, Alupang?
I believe a heck of a lot longer than a grit filled oiled chain that is simply wiped down and lubed on occasion; even with a monthly solvent bath too. Perhaps a perfectly clean and oiled chain (what was broken and soaked in stinky solvents) in a perfectly clean sterile environment will last the longest? Not sure but when you add real world grime into the equation the clean waxed chain will come WAY out on top--this is my belief anyway. My chain is silky smooth and quiet every day, all of the time--this is hard to do with oiled chains and real world dirt.

My method is hugely significant in that the chain never has to be broken to be properly soaked and cleaned in hot wax--this drastically reduces the time to apply new fresh wax to about 5 minutes. That's about than the time it takes for me to shave each morning...


Once you practice a little and get the method down...like your pot of wax is ever-ready (of course you reuse it over and over...) to throw on the stove and you know how to cycle/move the chain through the hot wax it becomes such a quick and simple procedure--I can't see how anyone could disagree. No more black grime infested chains and cassettes, no more stinky solvents and black stained rags and toothbrushes, no more black globs of grime flying all over your stays and staining your cloths, silky smooth and quiet drivetrain...the advantages are enormous.
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Old 09-28-12, 06:35 PM
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For what little it's worth, when I tried waxing chains, they lasted about 2,000 miles. When I use oil, they last about 2,000 miles. The difference, now that I'm commuting, is that I don't have to play with the wax bucket every other week and can go for a long bike ride.
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Old 09-28-12, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb
For what little it's worth, when I tried waxing chains, they lasted about 2,000 miles. When I use oil, they last about 2,000 miles. The difference, now that I'm commuting, is that I don't have to play with the wax bucket every other week and can go for a long bike ride.

There is a guy in this article respond thread getting 5000 miles out of a paraffin waxed modern slim chain (10000 miles on older chains!). Note that the article states the chain needs to be broken and soaked for 20 minutes--that is false if you use my drape method.
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Old 09-28-12, 07:00 PM
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Whoops forgot to add the link sorry. Here it is:

https://www.ecovelo.info/2011/01/08/f...ng-re-visited/
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Old 09-28-12, 07:09 PM
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My chain has what appears to be a KMC Missing Link. It is very easy to remove the chain. So would it be easier to just pull it off and drop the whole thing into the wax, or maybe just drape it through the wax? I guess it would be better to use your method and leave it on since I wouldn't have to actually touch the chain.
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Old 09-28-12, 08:14 PM
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No offense, it would be nice if there was more concrete evidence for the mileage rather than "they must last longer than oiled chains, look at how dirty they get!" The guy on EcoVelo is estimating as well, and lives in about the perfect environment to use waxed chains.

The solvent-and-oil process needn't be as messy as most people make it, either -- the thing is to wipe the chain thoroughly after oiling, then wipe it periodically to remove the oil that works its way out. I'll succumb and try waxing a chain someday, but I'll probably use a greater proportion of beeswax and throw in a little grease for better lubrication when I do.
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Old 09-28-12, 11:30 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
No offense, it would be nice if there was more concrete evidence for the mileage rather than "they must last longer than oiled chains, look at how dirty they get!" The guy on EcoVelo is estimating as well, and lives in about the perfect environment to use waxed chains.

The solvent-and-oil process needn't be as messy as most people make it, either -- the thing is to wipe the chain thoroughly after oiling, then wipe it periodically to remove the oil that works its way out. I'll succumb and try waxing a chain someday, but I'll probably use a greater proportion of beeswax and throw in a little grease for better lubrication when I do.
What's the perfect environment for waxed chains? On Guam it rains just about everyday during the wet season--I get soaked twice a week usually. Under these extremely harsh conditions, I wax a little more often. If I was using oil I can't imagine all the road grime getting inside the cassette and chain... horrible mess to deal with on rainy days.

I dip my water soaked chain in hot wax and it comes out good as new.

Your other comment about adding grease to the wax--I think that would defeat the grime repelling properties of using pure paraffin.
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Old 09-28-12, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94
My chain has what appears to be a KMC Missing Link. It is very easy to remove the chain. So would it be easier to just pull it off and drop the whole thing into the wax, or maybe just drape it through the wax? I guess it would be better to use your method and leave it on since I wouldn't have to actually touch the chain.

I use a road bike with a Dura Ace chain--I thought Shimano had problems with their removable link I'm not sure. I suppose if I had that option I would consider removing the chain...but the more I think about, I see no real advantage just more steps in the process (taking the chain on and off the bike).
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Old 09-29-12, 04:58 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
No offense, it would be nice if there was more concrete evidence for the mileage rather than "they must last longer than oiled chains, look at how dirty they get!" The guy on EcoVelo is estimating as well, and lives in about the perfect environment to use waxed chains.
There's an experiment of one that this guy did with running a dry chain, cleaning only with WD-40 when his chain was dirty. Search for wd-40, it's about 3/4 of the way down on the page. There's a growing following of people that are experimenting with running a dry chain, cleaning with WD-40 only when necessary.

I'm currently performing the same experiment on my new trike and my commuter. I'm cleaning with WD-40 when the chain is visibly dirty.. if I ride in the rain and I remember, I clean out the water with WD-40 (which is probably better than I previously did leaving it wet).
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Old 09-29-12, 05:09 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
No offense, it would be nice if there was more concrete evidence for the mileage rather than "they must last longer than oiled chains, look at how dirty they get!" The guy on EcoVelo is estimating as well, and lives in about the perfect environment to use waxed chains.

The solvent-and-oil process needn't be as messy as most people make it, either -- the thing is to wipe the chain thoroughly after oiling, then wipe it periodically to remove the oil that works its way out. I'll succumb and try waxing a chain someday, but I'll probably use a greater proportion of beeswax and throw in a little grease for better lubrication when I do.
Good points.

One thing I think we all are forgetting is that its whats inside the chain that matters, not the outside as much. So what we see on the outside may only represent a little in what is going on inside of the chain.
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Old 09-29-12, 05:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Alupang
I use a road bike with a Dura Ace chain--I thought Shimano had problems with their removable link I'm not sure. I suppose if I had that option I would consider removing the chain...but the more I think about, I see no real advantage just more steps in the process (taking the chain on and off the bike).
Can you take pics of the process you use?
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Old 09-29-12, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by chandltp
There's an experiment of one that this guy did with running a dry chain, cleaning only with WD-40 when his chain was dirty. Search for wd-40, it's about 3/4 of the way down on the page. There's a growing following of people that are experimenting with running a dry chain, cleaning with WD-40 only when necessary.

I'm currently performing the same experiment on my new trike and my commuter. I'm cleaning with WD-40 when the chain is visibly dirty.. if I ride in the rain and I remember, I clean out the water with WD-40 (which is probably better than I previously did leaving it wet).
Interesting but I like the feeling of a waxed chain--so silky smooth and quiet. Plus I get a nice buildup of wax on my expensive Dura Ace crankset rings I figure it helps reduce wear. WD40 gives off a strong solvent smell and my bike sits in my living room so not for me. I would imagine it's cleaner than oil though--interesting idea.
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Old 09-29-12, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by chefisaac
Can you take pics of the process you use?
I'll try when I wax again.
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Old 09-29-12, 10:41 PM
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Rule of thumb: the folks that make chain know how to lubricate them. They have a strong economic incentive in making them last as long as they can, so they're likely to tell end users how to take care of them. How many of them wax them?
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Old 09-29-12, 10:56 PM
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Really? The folks who make a consumable item "have a strong economic incentive in making them last as long as they can" ?
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Old 09-30-12, 02:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Alupang
Interesting but I like the feeling of a waxed chain--so silky smooth and quiet. Plus I get a nice buildup of wax on my expensive Dura Ace crankset rings I figure it helps reduce wear. WD40 gives off a strong solvent smell and my bike sits in my living room so not for me. I would imagine it's cleaner than oil though--interesting idea.
As I understand it, WD40 is largely kerosene or something very similar - it might be good for some applications like displacing water but probably not a very suitable lube for bike chains.
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Old 09-30-12, 02:07 AM
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Originally Posted by RickB.
Really? The folks who make a consumable item "have a strong economic incentive in making them last as long as they can" ?
Their incentive is to make you believe their product lasts longer than their competitor's products.
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Old 09-30-12, 02:58 AM
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I might give this a try. 2 of my bikes are fixed gear, so I'd have to take the back wheel off to get enough slack, but it may be worth it if it solves my problem with dropping stuff like gloves and hats onto the nasty black chain. And why is it that something dropped always seems to land on or bounce off of the chain?

So for the simple minded folks like me, who stand baffled by the selection, which candle do we get? Or is it not a candle I should be looking for? This is what confronted me when I went to try to find paraffin.



I never saw anything like what is described in that EcoVelo link. Maybe I missed it?
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Walmart candle aisle.jpg (100.7 KB, 100 views)

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Old 09-30-12, 03:13 AM
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LOL that pic made me laugh. I always buy the cheap stuff that comes in a brick shaped cardboard box. Inside are several slabs of white/clear pure paraffin wax. The brand box is labeled "Parowax Household Wax" in a simple blue and white box. Buy two boxes and it will last you years and years...
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Old 09-30-12, 03:21 AM
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Originally Posted by dscheidt
Rule of thumb: the folks that make chain know how to lubricate them. They have a strong economic incentive in making them last as long as they can, so they're likely to tell end users how to take care of them. How many of them wax them?
Yep under ideal conditions and unlimited time to properly solvent clean your chain and/or you have a pro mechanic do all your dirty work for you I'm sure oil is the ultimate best. We have a winner here.

But for me and my real world... I need an alternative to riding a stinking grime filled oiled chain. I simply don't have the time and/or want to deal with breaking chains and soaking in solvents. Wax works for me.
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