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Am I locking correctly?

Old 10-30-13, 03:17 AM
  #1  
ScuzUK
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Am I locking correctly?

This isn't a ego fluff "Oh look at me ain't I such a good boy Mum" post.

I'm poor and I bought the most expensive plain looking bike I could. On my journeys I'm some times forced to lock the bike up outside instead of being able to take it in. I spend the majority of the time running in and out or sitting by a window keeping at eye on it. I lock it to some thing secure and thick (No point locking it to some thing that's easier to cut through then the lock itself).

I'm using a Kryptonite Evolution Mini 7, Kryptonite Kryptoflex 7 ft Cable and Kryptonite Evolution Series 4.



I use the Big U-Lock through the back wheel and seat tube, the mini through the downtube and front wheel and secure the saddle with the cable.

The saddle bag, phone mount and lights come with me.

I think to the best of my knowledge that's correct?
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Old 10-30-13, 03:39 AM
  #2  
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You do a better job than I do. Are instances of bike and bike part theft high in your area?

Better to ask Hal: https://www.streetfilms.org/hal-and-k...-bike-locking/
I think he'd give you an "A+".
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Old 10-30-13, 03:51 AM
  #3  
ScuzUK
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Originally Posted by randomgear View Post
Are instances of bike and bike part theft high in your area?
True story: So I was moving away from the area, the place I was living in came totally unfurnished (In hind site it would of just caused an inviting break in if any thing of value had been left in the house). So we had to get ourselves a cheap electric cooker. We did, we found one of gumtree, heavy thing, it took 3 of us to lift it and get it in place but we managed it. When moving out day came, the 3 of us let out a big sigh and lugged it out of the place onto the street and called the council to collect it.

After no more then 20 mins a strapping, huge woman turned up. Bear hugged the thing and walked up a hill with it. My jaw dropped!

It's just one of those areas. It's not that there are specialized bike thieves with mini gas cutters and a huge arsenal of tools. It's just if you leave it, some one will have it.

I don't like visiting the area too often and I'm trying to convince my friends to rearrange the furniture in some way so I can keep it inside.
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Old 10-30-13, 06:36 AM
  #4  
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Two lock method using good ulocks: looks good to me. I'd recomend (and you probably do this) to fill the ulock shackle (with solid-fixed object, bike frame, wheel & crank) to frustrate jacking.
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Old 10-30-13, 08:23 AM
  #5  
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It is better than I usually have to do.

I have a small cable lock, it lives around/through the seat rails, and the seatstays, securing my Brooks to the rest of the bike.
I also have a hardened square link chain and a mini U-lock, used in a similar fashion to the OP's use of the large U-lock; securing rear wheel and frame to the immovable object.
I have a larger U-lock used the same way as the OP uses his smaller U-lock; securing front wheel and frame to each other.
Well, that is how I envisioned using them, actually, I only have the seat secured to the frame. One of the advantages of living in a relatively rural area is that just about everyone (LEO's, first responders, etc.) knows me and my bike.
Also, my bike is heavy enough that most folks don't want to carry or ride it too far.
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Old 10-30-13, 08:25 AM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
Two lock method using good ulocks: looks good to me. I'd recomend (and you probably do this) to fill the ulock shackle (with solid-fixed object, bike frame, wheel & crank) to frustrate jacking.
That's genius that I just wouldn't of thought of doing!
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Old 10-30-13, 08:55 AM
  #7  
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Go to the Kryptonite web site. The examples of how to lock up are the best.

The best way is to remove the front wheel put it beside the back wheel, and get both wheels the frame, one crank arm, and the thing you are locking to into the D lock.
It fills the space inside the lock. If there is room for a pipe in the lock inner space, it can be levered and broken in some cases. Also this uses only the D lock, and gets both wheels. If the seat post clamp is quick release take the seat. Put a cork in the post to keep rain out. The cable won't slow down someone who plans ahead to steal a bike. If you are forced to use a cable wind it tight and get the lock part of the cable up high so it can not be put on the ground. If the lock mechanism of a cable can be put on the ground, a hammer, rock, etc can be used to slam the mechanism and it comes apart. Don't need to cut the cable. Wind the cable as tight as possible.
The problem with all this is you can't lock to something as big as a phone pole unless you use a not very secure cable. The only way to do get around a phone pole is to buy a hardened Kryptonite chain. The New York Chain will work, but it weighs a ton. But it will slow down most thieves.
Again make sure the lock mechanism on the chain can't reach the ground. If you are caerfull it will do what the D lock will do. Some riders lock the chain around the waist or over one shoulder. If you do this don't go near the water, if you fall in it's over.

Forget locking the bike outside at night.
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Old 10-30-13, 09:02 AM
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good job
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Old 10-30-13, 10:14 AM
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Just found these in another thread. They look pretty good. I own a pair of locking skewers, but they work with a special tool only. They are not heavy either. However I don't use them, because if I lose the one tool, I have a big problem. This is why I think the combination locks are so nice. You can write down the combination, or put it in your cell phone under the name "lock". Or whatever you like. I did this for a relative.

https://www.sphyke.com/how-it-works/
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Old 10-30-13, 10:56 AM
  #10  
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See this: https://www.missinglink.org/page/how-lock-bike
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Old 10-31-13, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by xtrajack View Post
It is better than I usually have to do.

I have a small cable lock, it lives around/through the seat rails, and the seatstays, securing my Brooks to the rest of the bike.
I also have a hardened square link chain and a mini U-lock, used in a similar fashion to the OP's use of the large U-lock; securing rear wheel and frame to the immovable object.
I have a larger U-lock used the same way as the OP uses his smaller U-lock; securing front wheel and frame to each other.
Well, that is how I envisioned using them, actually, I only have the seat secured to the frame. One of the advantages of living in a relatively rural area is that just about everyone (LEO's, first responders, etc.) knows me and my bike.
Also, my bike is heavy enough that most folks don't want to carry or ride it too far.
Mmmm ... Brooks ... Yummy! Which do you have? I am soon to be the proud owner of a Lady B18 in Raspberry with matching grips!

I, too, have found that although I have an aluminum frame, I have put enough crap (all essential) on Lola that, although, appealing to the eye she would (I can only hope) deter a thief, because she is heavy (estimate 35 lbs with everything) and things just look too complicated to steal (at least that is what my bike shop mechanic told me when he helped me put the Reelight 770's on).
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Old 11-01-13, 04:06 PM
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Another video on locking your bike.

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Old 11-02-13, 09:46 AM
  #13  
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That looks good. One improvement would be to get a padlock and run the cable through the seat, around the frame, and around a stationary object. Also, make sure that both front and rear locks go to independent stationary object.

Ideally, anybody who wanted your bike would need to cut three separate locks. Now, if you were to replace one of the U locks with a heavy duty chain, you complicate that job even more since they would require different tools. Bike thieves are less likely to carry tools to break more than one or two kinds of locks.
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