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Commuter bike upgrade recommendations

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Commuter bike upgrade recommendations

Old 09-30-14, 09:24 PM
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thiocyclist
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Commuter bike upgrade recommendations

I currently ride a 3-speed IGH that is a tad heavier than I'd like on a 15 mile round trip commute, most days of the work week (I take light rail part of the time, for bad weather or exhaustion). The area I ride is fairly hilly and the roads are not without their potholes and cracks. If I were to work in a $500-1000 budget, including used bicycles, what might be a good upgrade? Or is there nothing out there better for the job than my budget 3-speed (which gets the job done currently, I'm just looking at the guys with the $2K+ bikes training for some marathon a bit enviously)?

I come from a background of never spending more than $400 on any bike. Ever. I've got somewhere between 6,000-7,000 miles on my career odometer as a cyclist, but this is the first time I've thought I could stand to upgrade to something outside my relatively inexpensive stable. However I have so little experience with "nice bikes" I really don't know where to start, hence the post.
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Old 10-01-14, 10:22 AM
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Brother, there is nothing wrong with upgrading, even if you don't like to spend money. You need the right tool to get the job done, correct? If you are a serious rider there is nothing wrong with looking for a more serious bike. I am pretty serious about my biking and have a road bike that cost $750 that I wound up putting another $700 into, I have a carbon fiber that I bought for $1500 and a mountain bike that I bought for $550. I just bought a new commuter and only spent $600 for it, you just have to know what your looking for. You don't have to spend a lot to get a lot. I bought this latest one because I wanted Hydro disc brakes and wider tires to commute, I found a Charge Zester for $600, it's really nice, it's a 2013 and I don't know how I found it but I scoured the internet.
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Old 10-01-14, 11:04 AM
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Thanks -- I guess what I'm looking for primarily is the kind of advice like, "You want to look for certain kinds of [touring/cyclocross/mountain] bike in that price range," or "You're better off with bikes that have [specific feature] for a longer/hillier commute," or else "Nothing in your budget is going to outperform your 3-speed so significantly you will be glad you spent the money,"... etc.
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Old 10-01-14, 11:12 AM
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You can find a number of bikes that will do the job better than your current set up with a $500 to $1000 budget. You can get a bike that is lighter, has better gearing, and has tough tires for your commute.

One possibility is to go with a touring bike. Bikes direct has some good choices in that price range. The fuji touring bike is pretty sweet at an MSRP of $715; that's probably the best deal out there on a touring bike.

If you want something a bit sportier go with a cross bike like this from BD (aluminum frame, steel fork, pretty tough wheels, rack braze ons): Save up to 60% off new Cyclocross Road Bikes - Motobecane Fantom CX Clearance

My vote is the cross bike. They're tough bikes and make very capable commuters.
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Old 10-01-14, 11:33 AM
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At the upper end of your budget range I'd look at something like the Fyxation Quiver. Or a Bikes Direct something, if you currently do your own maintenance you could be riding within minutes of unpacking. At that level I'm not sure just how much lighter it might be, but then I imagine yours is quite heavy. It's accessories that add to commuters weight over the road bikes you see. Racks, bags, lights, fenders and 2.X puncture proof tires all add enough that it's not really worth the effort to worry about bike weight. Unless you commute on the very light side you'll still be riding a lead sled. If all I have to do is work and back I'm around 155lb--bike and rider. If I have to ride the carry-anything bike I can top 180 before I get to the store.

+1 on a cross bike.

Last edited by gregjones; 10-01-14 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 10-01-14, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
You can find a number of bikes that will do the job better than your current set up with a $500 to $1000 budget. You can get a bike that is lighter, has better gearing, and has tough tires for your commute.

One possibility is to go with a touring bike. Bikes direct has some good choices in that price range. The fuji touring bike is pretty sweet at an MSRP of $715; that's probably the best deal out there on a touring bike.

If you want something a bit sportier go with a cross bike like this from BD (aluminum frame, steel fork, pretty tough wheels, rack braze ons): Save up to 60% off new Cyclocross Road Bikes - Motobecane Fantom CX Clearance

My vote is the cross bike. They're tough bikes and make very capable commuters.
That Fantom CX is a pretty awesome deal at $469. I bought it last year for $100 more and am very happy with it. I commute pretty regularly on it. The only thing I changed out was the tires (am running Continental 4 Seasons 28).
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Old 10-01-14, 11:47 AM
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I agree with the CX bike recommendations. Unless you carry a ton of stuff around on your commute, a touring bike isn't necessary. Touring bikes can handle like moving vans, especially when they're not loaded. If you take your time, you will be able to find a used Surly or Soma cross bike in that price range. Those are really well made bikes and usually come with great components.
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Old 10-02-14, 07:18 AM
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CX certainly seems like a great deal. How do you get a bike like that and ride it with a more upright style though? I'm afraid hunching over all the time will start to wear on my back. With my Schwinns I've always found the upright riding to be uncomfortable, favoring the "hunched" position; but those were rides I did once a week, not daily. Very tempted by the yellow, though.
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Old 10-02-14, 10:28 AM
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from a fellow colorado commuter who also started with an upright steel 3 speed.

I upgraded in 2011 to a torker graduate, IGH 5 speed with drum brakes.

If I had a need to upgrade right now I would go for a 2014 graduate with disk brakes and new 9spd drive train. About 630 bucks.
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Old 10-02-14, 06:08 PM
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Can anyone tell me how long the crank arms are on the Fantom CX? I can't find it on BD or Moto's website. Hoping for 170 mm (54 cm).

Originally Posted by jdswitters View Post
from a fellow colorado commuter who also started with an upright steel 3 speed.

I upgraded in 2011 to a torker graduate, IGH 5 speed with drum brakes.

If I had a need to upgrade right now I would go for a 2014 graduate with disk brakes and new 9spd drive train. About 630 bucks.
I can't find the IGH 5-speed version. Is it heavy?
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Old 10-02-14, 06:55 PM
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Nothing wrong with the Pragmatic 3 speed IGH .. maybe a nicer steel frame made from a lighter steel alloy tubeset.

nicer rims and tires crank seat and bars .. your wider cogs and chain last a very long time compared vs the narrow ones to pack in 9 cogs .
There are also the Shimano 8 speed IG hubs too ..

Last edited by fietsbob; 10-02-14 at 07:03 PM.
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Old 10-02-14, 11:54 PM
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You could just upgrade to an 8 speed hub if you find yourself ergonomically in agreement with this ride you have now.

If you really wanna go lighter i can recommend this:

Fuji Bikes | LIFESTYLE | FITNESS | ABSOLUTE 2.3

Good luck & keep us posted!

- Andy
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Old 10-03-14, 06:27 AM
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I'm just trying to find a way to keep from getting so exhausted after 2-3 consecutive days of these hills and this mileage. My old commute was shorter and flatter. This one's taking a toll on me -- I sweat a lot more so I have to replace lots more fluids, and if I'm being honest I think it has kind of made me constipated from the fluid loss (or that is my best guess). Sorry if that's TMI. But I love bike commuting so whatever I can do to ease the burden and keep doing it more often is my goal. If that means a lighter bike, so be it. Or maybe an 8-speed IGH *is* the way to go, but my understanding is my dropouts aren't right for it and it would add some weight. Still the 3-speed IGH could benefit from at least a couple more speeds (both directions) so it would help there.
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Old 10-03-14, 06:46 AM
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Mid-to late 1980's Sport/Touring bike with mounts for fenders/rack and water bottles. You can find a really nice bike used, if you educate yourself a bit. Hang over in the Classic & Vintage section. Lots of nice folks over there who would be glad to answer questions and weigh in on suggestions. You will need to know what size frame you ride.

Some good basic info here: Learn About Bikes with Rivendell Bicycle Works on fitting older bikes. I have pruchased many, really nice bikes for well under $400 each.
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Old 10-03-14, 06:55 AM
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Originally Posted by thiocyclist View Post
Thanks -- I guess what I'm looking for primarily is the kind of advice like, "You want to look for certain kinds of [touring/cyclocross/mountain] bike in that price range," or "You're better off with bikes that have [specific feature] for a longer/hillier commute," or else "Nothing in your budget is going to outperform your 3-speed so significantly you will be glad you spent the money,"... etc.
I honestly don't think so. It's a matter of what you like, not what's more appropriate, given your hilly 15 miles round trip. So I recommend that you upgrade to a bike that you like better, that you'd really like to ride even when you're not commuting (whatever kind of rides you do), and use that for the commute when the mood strikes you.
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Old 10-03-14, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by thiocyclist View Post
Can anyone tell me how long the crank arms are on the Fantom CX? I can't find it on BD or Moto's website. Hoping for 170 mm (54 cm).



I can't find the IGH 5-speed version. Is it heavy?

They quit making the 5 speed a few years ago and it is heavy-ish at about 40lbs. I have racks, folding basket and dyno hub, so my typical ride weight with lock is around 45. I dont know how much lighter the new ones are.
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Old 10-03-14, 08:06 PM
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Anyone know how I can convert the QR axel to a regular nut? I hate the relative insecurity of QRs, I always carry a tool. I either need to convert it or I need to get a second lock just to keep the wheel locked to the frame, since I do the Sheldon Brown method (rear triangle lock).
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Old 10-03-14, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by thiocyclist View Post
Can anyone tell me how long the crank arms are on the Fantom CX? I can't find it on BD or Moto's website. Hoping for 170 mm (54 cm).
Not at all intended to be demeaning, but it's probably between 165-175mm and I would be surprised if you could tell the difference from one extreme to the other.

I can't find the IGH 5-speed version. Is it heavy? Of course it is. An IGH hub alone weighs what a lightweight wheelset weighs. If weight is a concern, forget how to spell IGH.
Originally Posted by thiocyclist View Post
Anyone know how I can convert the QR axel to a regular nut? I hate the relative insecurity of QRs THERE ARE NO POBLEMS WITH A QR THAT SHOULD TRIGGER ANY FORM OF INSECURITY. Adjust it correctly and go. That's not even a topic of debate. If you are worried that much, do a search in the Bicycle Mechanics forum and you will find an answer. I did a few days ago, and found an answer, but the search was not related to any insecurity issues.
Good luck, and it will come faster if you worry about problems that actually exist.
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Old 10-03-14, 09:45 PM
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Probably a bit on the high end of your budget, but I went from an 80's Schwinn High Plains with road tires to a Motobecane Fantom Cross Ti pro last December and now have over 2500 miles on the bike.

I never rode the OEM saddle and equipped it with a Brooks Imperial right from the start.

The difference between my commute time by bike vs car is now down to 3-5min. (19-20 min bike-15-18 min car)

175 mm crank arms, but I think the smaller size frames come with 170's

You should be able to buy a solid axle to replace a QR at about any bike shop. Other than theft issues I don't know why that would be advantageous.
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Old 10-03-14, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
Good luck, and it will come faster if you worry about problems that actually exist.
I know you probably don't mean to but you come off a bit mean in that post. In any case if you feel like pointing me to "correct" QR adjustment guidelines that somehow make it as hard to loosen as something that requires a wrench 100% of the time I'm genuinely interested, as it's news to me.

Am I an idiot? Maybe, but I'm willing to learn. Be gentle.

EDIT: Also, I don't know if it was clear but my use of insecurity referred to theft, not while riding.

Last edited by thiocyclist; 10-03-14 at 10:57 PM.
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Old 10-03-14, 11:29 PM
  #21  
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For $500 you can get a used road bike of high quality, with wide range derailleur gearing, that is quite light. The gearing and light weight will be helpful on the hills. The road bike position and tires will be more efficient on the flats. And it will whistle on the downhills.

It will be older. No problem. My daily commute bike is a 1980 road bike. I've ridden it on two centuries as well.
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Old 10-04-14, 02:02 PM
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You can definitely get a faster bike for the money you're looking for.

A good place to start would be the Specialized Secteur, it's $850 for the base model:
Specialized Bicycle Components

If you get an "endurance road" bike, they're more upright and generally handle bumpy road better.

A crosscheck or touring bike is not a bad idea either, as they're road bikes that can take a larger tire. But they tend to get more expensive.

Biggest question is whether you can be comfortable on a road bike. Obviously lots of people do ride road bikes, but it's easier to find a comfortable position on an upright bike. Still, the road bike is going to be faster and less exhausting.

P.S. If you don't like quick release for some reason, you can replace them with something like this (Delta Axlerodz Bolt On Bicycle Skewers
):
Robot Check

Usually that's just done for "more work to steal" reasons though.
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Old 10-04-14, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Usually that's just done for "more work to steal" reasons though.
That'd be my logic exactly, and it's why I have been happier without QRs on my Windsor. It makes locking up Sheldon Brown style safe, fast and simple. Nobody's ever messed with my front wheel, as they would need a 15 mm wrench. Granted I don't leave it parked overnight anywhere outside.
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Old 10-04-14, 10:31 PM
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Go to LBS, look at bikes, ask questions, test ride a drop bar road bike and something claimed to be flat bar road bike. Once you start narrowing down your requirements, people will have suggestions. That Fantom CX looks like a great bike for the price. If you consider this route, you might want to consider letting your LBS assemble it for the $60-$75. Even adding that cost in, I think it's still a decent deal.

In the brand name department, Giant and Fuji offer better value for your dollar than the big three (Specialized, Trek, Cannondale).

I used to have the $400 rule for tvs. The last one I bought, though, was a 46" Sony LCD for $800 back in 2010. I could not be happier!
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Old 10-04-14, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
If you want something a bit sportier go with a cross bike like this from BD (aluminum frame, steel fork, pretty tough wheels, rack braze ons): Save up to 60% off new Cyclocross Road Bikes - Motobecane Fantom CX Clearance

My vote is the cross bike. They're tough bikes and make very capable commuters.
BD for the win! That's what I did and I don't regret it one bit. You can spend the same money for some used PoS on Craigslist, some overpriced PoS at an LBS or get a lot more bang for your buck from BD.
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