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Speaking of flatting - techniques for rapid recovery and back on the road?

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Speaking of flatting - techniques for rapid recovery and back on the road?

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Old 11-01-14, 11:36 AM
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Speaking of flatting - techniques for rapid recovery and back on the road?

As long as we are on another run of tire recommendations, how about recommendations or techniques that get us back on the road as quickly as possible after a flat?

A couple of things I'm thinking of trying are pulling the rear wheel just enough to remove the tire and tube from the ND side instead of completely taking the wheel out of the drive train and off the bike. The other is attempting to fix the flat without even doing that much - slip the tube out of the tire, find the hole, patch it, and remount the tire.

Getting that rear wheel out of the drivetrain always seems to be a pain and greasy mess for me, and as I am very inexperienced with flats carry a spare folding tire so I don't have to search out the puncture source in the tire until I get home. Just flip in the replacement tire and tube and back on my way.
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Old 11-01-14, 12:35 PM
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Flip the bike upside down, resting on seat and bars. Shift the rear derailleur until you are on the smallest gear, then use a tool, or glove, if you were smart enough to pack work gloves, to flick the chain off to the side while you pull the wheel. Reverse to install. I still think the best solution is to not get flats. I pick tough tires (Sirrus Armidillos, or Panaracer RiBMos) and really have about one flat per every 5,000 mile year.
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Old 11-01-14, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
A couple of things I'm thinking of trying are pulling the rear wheel just enough to remove the tire and tube from the ND side instead of completely taking the wheel out of the drive train and off the bike. The other is attempting to fix the flat without even doing that much - slip the tube out of the tire, find the hole, patch it, and remount the tire.
Good luck with that.

At least on my commuters that would mean I'd have to work around the fenders, fenderstays, rack, and panniers in addition to the seatstays and chainstays. Just too much fussing around and interference in tiny spaces for me.

Of course, that's before considering that trying to work on the NDS with the bike laying down means the DS is on the ground, potentially bending the RD or RD hanger.

IMHO, it's far, far easier to just take the wheel out, find a nice place to sit and work on it without interference.
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Old 11-01-14, 01:07 PM
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Patching on the road is futile and frustrating.

Carrying a good tube and swapping it out is the fastest way to go.

If you take more than 4 minutes, you pretty much suck and need more practice.

How to Change a Bicycle Flat Tire Without Hands.Inspiring and amazing - YouTube
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Old 11-01-14, 01:11 PM
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However, if you just put in a new tube, you may get another flat from whatever caused the first flat. No real shortcuts, but a co2 inflator makes the inflate time faster and easier. A pair of disposable gloves makes the job much cleaner.
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Old 11-01-14, 01:29 PM
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Practice, practice, practice. Yeah that's right practice changing flats in front of the tv at night when you are home watching or some other moment when you have time.
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Old 11-01-14, 01:41 PM
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Flip the bike upside down, resting on seat and bars.
I don't get why people do this instead of just laying the bike down. What's the point? Seems like there's more liklihood of damage from tipping over, cracking handlebar electronics and accessories, and harder to work on.

Most of the people I see doing this don't really seem to know what they're doing... I'm sure you're the exception GD.
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Old 11-01-14, 01:55 PM
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Nail still in the tire you know where the hole will Be.
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Old 11-01-14, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Nail still in the tire you know where the hole will Be.
You must work at M1cros0ft
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Old 11-01-14, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by bruin11 View Post
Practice, practice, practice. Yeah that's right practice changing flats in front of the tv at night when you are home watching or some other moment when you have time.
+1. Best way to get faster at something is to keep practicing it until it's NBD.
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Old 11-01-14, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
I don't get why people do this instead of just laying the bike down. What's the point? Seems like there's more liklihood of damage from tipping over, cracking handlebar electronics and accessories, and harder to work on.

Most of the people I see doing this don't really seem to know what they're doing... I'm sure you're the exception GD.
Not really. I've done it this way literally hundreds of times. Besides, if you have to deal with discs IMO it's much easier to line the rotor up this way.
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Old 11-01-14, 02:21 PM
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I got the F**k out of the Bay Area 20 years plus, ago . because I dont Write Computer Code or own Yachts ..
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Old 11-01-14, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Patching on the road is futile and frustrating.

Carrying a good tube and swapping it out is the fastest way to go.
This.

If you're really lazy and impatient, inflate with co2.
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Old 11-01-14, 03:00 PM
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I've had to swap a couple of sets of tires over the last few weeks, just maintenance stuff. Even patched one inner tube. I can probably do it in about five minutes, so yeah, practice doing it at home so you can do it quickly on the side of the road.
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Old 11-01-14, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
The other is attempting to fix the flat without even doing that much - slip the tube out of the tire, find the hole, patch it, and remount the tire.
And how exactly would you do that if it's freezing cold outside, snowing or raining and dark ??
Seriously it's a lot faster and easier to take the wheel off, remove the tube and install a new tube, instead of screwing around and trying to find the hole and then trying to patch it.
I patch my tubes when I get home.
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Old 11-01-14, 04:16 PM
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Bike positioning - both laying it down and sitting upside down have always worried me - scratching the frame or hoods while trying to get the rear wheel out. Maybe I can learn to pull the rear wheel while holding the bike upright, then laying it down.

Seems like the whole process should be one smooth sweep either getting the rear wheel out or back in, but seems the RD is always in my way and I have to fiddle with it a little. Pulling and patching when conditions are perfect is NBD, just get the Nitrile gloves out and take my time. Even had to patch once earlier this fall on a nice sunny day, 4 miles from my car. (Hey, that's the first flat I remember having when riding. Ever. And it was on a commute.)

I'm ok with patching - ya, I practiced last year. My boys had tubes sitting around from flatting, so I practiced. Kit includes spare tube, spare tire, CO2, levers, glue on patches and mini pump as f*Up backup.

I really sound like a Princess in this thread. Now I'm embarrassed for asking. .

Buy hey - this thread is about Indy-style-back-on-the-road speed, without scratching the bike.
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Old 11-01-14, 04:36 PM
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I'll quote wolfchild here:
Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Seriously it's a lot faster and easier to take the wheel off, remove the tube and install a new tube, instead of screwing around and trying to find the hole and then trying to patch it. I patch my tubes when I get home.
That's why I carry the tire - so if anything but fietsbob's nail is in the tire, I don't have to search for it or risk re-flatting because the invisible wire or glass is still in the tire.
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Old 11-02-14, 08:10 AM
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get better tires and you won't have flats.

Having trouble wrestling with getting the tire back on the rim. Here is the easy way.

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Old 11-02-14, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by scoatw View Post
get better tires and you won't have flats.
Probably true - the Michelin Pro 4 Service Course aren't designed for commuting and flat protection, though the 25's give a really nice ride. If I get more flats than I am comfortable with, I'll pick up new tires. (but that's for another tire thread or twenty. heh)

Thanks for the vid, I will check it out. Always something new to learn.
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Old 11-02-14, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
The other is attempting to fix the flat without even doing that much - slip the tube out of the tire, find the hole, patch it, and remount the tire.

This works fine if the puncture is obvious and easy to find - like the object is still in the tire. I do it when I can, but probably only 10% of my flats are that obvious.
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Old 11-02-14, 09:27 AM
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Keep a spare inner tube at work. If you flat on the way in, you sill have a spare for the ride home.
I could patch the tube in some workplaces, but others frown on turning a desk into a workshop.
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Old 11-02-14, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
Keep a spare inner tube at work. If you flat on the way in, you sill have a spare for the ride home.
I could patch the tube in some workplaces, but others frown on turning a desk into a workshop.
Actually that's a really good idea, for more reasons than that. You never know, my patch kit could be dry. Or forgotten.
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Old 11-02-14, 10:18 AM
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I just carry a spare bike...

Actually I swap tubes and pump, and patch it later. But if I wanted to fix it quick I'd get one of those inflators that injects sealant. There are a few brands, Vittoria makes one and so do Geax and Hutchison.
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Old 11-02-14, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
I really sound like a Princess in this thread. Now I'm embarrassed for asking. .
No, not really. I think everyone wishes it was a bit easier. And everyone I know--and I have myself--has tried cheater methods.

Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
Buy hey - this thread is about Indy-style-back-on-the-road speed, without scratching the bike.
That's easy. All you need a team car following.

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Old 11-02-14, 11:41 AM
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Next time you eat at one of the places that offer the foil sealed moist towels take and extra one and put in your bike pouch. This way after to fix the flat you can clean your hands. Do not litter.

Practice is best. I can pull wheel, pull tire and tube. Find hole in tube and mark. Check inside of tire for object still stuck in there. Then fit new tube, reinstall wheel, pump up. I then stow the old tube, repack the bag and pump. Then I clean my hands. This takes maybe 5 minutes.

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