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Quick release connections for dynamo hub

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Quick release connections for dynamo hub

Old 01-08-19, 01:21 PM
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Quick release connections for dynamo hub

i have several bikes with dynamo hubs, both Schmidt and SP. The spade connectors at the hub are tight and difficult to reach, and I am afraid that I will damage them if I need to take the wheel off. I would like to find a good quick-release connector to put in the wires. What would you recommend?
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Old 01-08-19, 01:40 PM
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Originally, my first thought was the Shimano dynamo hub plug, but then I remembered that although it will slide over the prongs of the Schmidt, the plug is too fat/blades too thin for good contact.

What you can do is leave the spade connectors connected to the hub and then install some other connectors several inches down the line that are intended to be seperated/reconnected easily. If you had the proper crimper, Anderson Power Pole® would be my go-to since, my other hobby is HAM radio, I have drawers full of 'em. But any waterproof automotive electrical connector along those lines would work just as well.

I would take the time to solder and then shrink wrap whatever connection terminals you decide on for durability, in any case.
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Old 01-08-19, 01:58 PM
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Great. Thank you, base2.

I do a fair amount of wiring and I do solder and shrink wrap the connections (And I shrink wrap the shrink wrap as well, for extra support). Even so, those spade connectors are just not up to it.
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Old 01-08-19, 02:09 PM
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Lightbulb Diy..

With SON hubs you make the spade connectors easier to reach by how you orient them when you put the wheel in.. that's free..
How often to you have to pull the front wheel?

There are Inline power supply plugs you can solder in yourself Schmidt Co Ax cable makes that a bit more difficult...

with no Radio shack locally you can try this company Parts-express ..I use their services..






...

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-08-19 at 02:13 PM.
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Old 01-08-19, 03:08 PM
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The Shimano and SP connectors are the same. I can't imagine you could damage anything on the SP hubs with one of those connectors. But I however once did accidentally pull the wires out of a Shimano or SP connector when I was wearing gloves (winter) and was not careful enough to get a good grip on the connector. From that I learned that I need to be more careful when I pull the plug off.

In the photo I have a SP hub and Shimano connector. If the photo is a bit confusing, I have a front Tubus Tara rack on the bike. I have never used a SON hub, have nothing to suggest on that hub.

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Old 01-08-19, 03:22 PM
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I haven't used this but it seems like it's what you're looking for?

https://www.harriscyclery.net/produc...ector-5448.htm
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Old 01-08-19, 03:30 PM
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I've always found that the Shimano connector, if oriented as Tourist illustrates, falls off the hub if I forget to remove it when I drop the wheel.

Perhaps gently loosening the SON connector (if that's what OP has) just a tiny bit with a small, flat blade screwdriver would suffice?
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Old 01-08-19, 03:47 PM
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Lightbulb Littleford Dyna-Snap

Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
I haven't used this but it seems like it's what you're looking for?
harriscyclery.net/product/littleford-dyna-snap-connector-5448.htm
Interesting find!
littlefordbicycles.com/dyna-snap-com/
dyna-snap.com


Last edited by angerdan; 01-09-19 at 02:16 PM.
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Old 01-08-19, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
I haven't used this but it seems like it's what you're looking for?

https://www.harriscyclery.net/product/littleford-dyna-snap-connector-5448.
That looks just about perfect. I will try one out and report back.
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Old 01-09-19, 10:53 AM
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You can get gold-plated banana plugs in the proper size for generators from the people that sell Sinewave, too. It's a good idea, whichever you do, to stagger the plugs by a centimeter, or so, so you can't accidentally plug it into the wrong wire (or simply reverse the connectors on each wire).

I was going to suggest before you did, though, that you relieve the spade connectors a bit. They need to be snug, but not so tight that they are nigh impossible to remove; stick a slightly small flatblade screwdriver in the female connector, and wallow a bit (hold the connector with a pair of needlenose pliers, if you have to), and test the fit periodically.
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Old 01-09-19, 11:01 AM
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Lightbulb OK, but..

NB: (Been mentioned before) But they are single conductor, not coax, so you need to buy 2.. 1 for each wire..
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Old 01-09-19, 11:07 AM
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planet bike dynamo headlight uses an inline coax plug .. it is used to remove the light when you park the bike , so it wont get stolen. while you are @ work ..

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Old 01-09-19, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
You can get gold-plated banana plugs in the proper size for generators from the people that sell Sinewave, too. It's a good idea, whichever you do, to stagger the plugs by a centimeter, or so, so you can't accidentally plug it into the wrong wire (or simply reverse the connectors on each wire).

I was going to suggest before you did, though, that you relieve the spade connectors a bit. They need to be snug, but not so tight that they are nigh impossible to remove; stick a slightly small flatblade screwdriver in the female connector, and wallow a bit (hold the connector with a pair of needlenose pliers, if you have to), and test the fit periodically.
My experiences with Old British Motorcycles have led me to distrust banana connectors. :-) When I rewired my 1964 Bonneville I used nice fat wire and spade connectors, which I secured further with shrinkwrap over the attached connectors. I defied those connectors to vibrate apart!! But yeah, I can see that relieving the connectors would help.
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Old 01-09-19, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
NB: (Been mentioned before) But they are single conductor, not coax, so you need to buy 2.. 1 for each wire..
Yep, the website had a specific selection for two wires. All taken care of.
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Old 01-09-19, 12:34 PM
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The official Schmidt coax connector is pretty slick and comes apart really easily. I haven't used mine yet, but a friend says he has pulled it apart by taking the wheel out with no issues. It's expensive though. I went to Peter J. White's website first, looking for a picture, but he doesn't actually have a picture of the part. Compass does: https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/co...axial-adapter/

I was designing a shimano-style connector for schmidts when I found out about the coax, so I lost interest. Anyone wants the files can ask
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Old 01-09-19, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
planet bike dynamo headlight uses an inline coax plug .. it is used to remove the light when you park the bike , so it wont get stolen. while you are @ work ..

I was going to make a comment about the crime-ridden area where you live and ride, then I noticed the quick-release light mount.

Haven't had that problem (yet?) with my bolted-on lights.
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Old 01-09-19, 02:16 PM
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Lightbulb

Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
NB: (Been mentioned before) But they are single conductor, not coax, so you need to buy 2.. 1 for each wire..
They are available as 1,2 and 3 connection version.
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Old 01-09-19, 03:20 PM
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I thought I would face this concern so I built for it. I later discovered it wasn't necessary for me. But if it is for you, you can do this easily and cheaply enough. I used CCTV power connectors. The males are here, and oddly enough, the females are unavailable. I guess you have to do some searching but maybe this is enough to go on.

I have to remember to undo these connectors before removing my wheel. They're very strong, and on the few times I forgot, they held together, and the original plug came out of the hub.
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Old 01-09-19, 09:20 PM
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for what it's worth, this is what I've been using with my first generation Schmidt dynamo for a very long time (18 years??)
I use some Amphenol pins and sockets. Nice reliable parts, available at Digi-key with p/n's #889-1233-ND and #889-1232-ND. No reason that any other quality pins and sockets wouldn't work too.



I've got a 3rd generation Schmidt with a very similar arrangement, albeit with wires that blend in a bit better.

Steve in Peoria
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Old 01-10-19, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post

My experiences with Old British Motorcycles have led me to distrust banana connectors. :-) When I rewired my 1964 Bonneville I used nice fat wire and spade connectors, which I secured further with shrinkwrap over the attached connectors. I defied those connectors to vibrate apart!! But yeah, I can see that relieving the connectors would help.
Somewhat interestingly, B&M spades have ridges and a corresponding hole (like a zip tie mechanism) to help hold them together without being unreasonably difficult to get apart. I realize it doesn't help the larger spade size, since B&M only makes the smaller ones, but there you go.
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Old 01-10-19, 06:01 PM
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How about a connector that is made for harsh environments? It might be heresy but a heavy duty vehicle connect would probably work, wouldn't be too expensive, would resist water & dirt ingress, and would be easy to separate even with gloves on. Something like a Deutsch DTM series should work well (go with the solid contacts, they have lower resistance.)(Batts Racing isn't the cheapest source, but they make it much easier than trying to figure it out from Deutsch's site.) Add a drop of NyoGel 760G on each contact and the connector should last forever and wouldn't vibrate apart. Just an opinion from someone who designs electronics for harsh environments.
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Old 01-10-19, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by RGMN View Post
How about a connector that is made for harsh environments? ....... Something like a Deutsch DTM series should work well (go with the solid contacts, they have lower resistance.).......
I've worked with the Deutsch connectors quite a bit in the earth moving industry. Hugely less expensive than the mil-spec stuff I worked with when doing avionics (a.k.a. aircraft electronics), but still quite rugged and reliable. In fact, the pins I show in my recent post are used in the Deutsch connectors. My only issue with the connectors is that they are rather bulky for bike applications.
I've had pretty good luck with just the pins and sockets, and perhaps a bit of dielectric grease now and then. The nickle plating on the contacts are quite resistant to corrosion, though, even in lousy conditions such as shown below....



Steve in Peoria (no snow right now)
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Old 01-10-19, 09:17 PM
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Cheap and easy solution:


Step by step, no solder instructions here.

Idea shamelessly stolen from @southpawboston, aka Velo Lumino
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Old 01-10-19, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
I've worked with the Deutsch connectors quite a bit in the earth moving industry. Hugely less expensive than the mil-spec stuff I worked with when doing avionics (a.k.a. aircraft electronics), but still quite rugged and reliable. In fact, the pins I show in my recent post are used in the Deutsch connectors. My only issue with the connectors is that they are rather bulky for bike applications.
I've had pretty good luck with just the pins and sockets, and perhaps a bit of dielectric grease now and then. The nickle plating on the contacts are quite resistant to corrosion, though, even in lousy conditions such as shown below....
The DTM series is substantially smaller than the DT series, and shouldn't be too bulky on a bike.

FWIW NEVER use dielectric grease on the contacts. As it ages it create issues of its own, primarily fretting on the contacts, as well as becoming a sticky mess. NyoGel 760G lubricates the contacts and prevents fretting. And it doesn't dry out and create a sticky mess.
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Old 01-11-19, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by RGMN View Post
FWIW NEVER use dielectric grease on the contacts. As it ages it create issues of its own, primarily fretting on the contacts, as well as becoming a sticky mess. NyoGel 760G lubricates the contacts and prevents fretting. And it doesn't dry out and create a sticky mess.
How do contacts fret? Doesn't fretting require small repetitive mechanical motions? Electrical contacts on my bike stay connected for months or years at a time.
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