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Should an old rookie go clipless?

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Should an old rookie go clipless?

Old 08-08-18, 09:17 PM
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Should an old rookie go clipless?

I've been riding my vintage bikes with either half clips or with clips with loose fitting straps. I just can't get used to the idea of having my feet strapped in where I can't get out of them quickly.
I'm curious about clipless pedals. So other than the pedals what type of shoes would I need and what pedals would be good to start out with? Thanks Bob
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Old 08-08-18, 09:26 PM
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Shimano MTB pedals. In particular, PD-M520s. Cheap, adjustable, tough. And MTB shoes you can walk around in, just like a normal person.

For shoes, the ones that fit you. You don't have to spend a ton. I tried resisting clippy pedals for awhile, and now I can't ride without them.

If you can handle half clips or straps, clipless is waaaayyyy easier.
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Old 08-08-18, 09:40 PM
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I agree with DrIsotope mostly. However, I have two bikes set up with clips/loose straps and two bikes with clipless. They are all equal in comfort and ease of use in my opinion. I do agree that clipless is much more comfortable and easier to deal with than clips/tight straps combined with cleats, but I haven't used a setup like that since I raced many years ago.
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Old 08-08-18, 10:40 PM
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Like he said, Shimano mtb pedals with the release set loose ( at least at first ). You can find shoes on sale at Nashbar or Performance.
I hate toe straps and have been using clipless on everything for 30ish years.
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Old 08-09-18, 04:39 AM
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Would these be just as good? I like the fact that you can turn them over and not use cleats https ebay.com/itm/Shimano-M324-SPD-Pedals/323387139616?_mwBanner=1&_rdt=1
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Old 08-09-18, 05:39 AM
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To answer your original question, yes an old rookie should go clipless. This old rookie did this year with sbd pedals in case I don’t want to be clipped in. If I’m riding in areas with quite a few stops, I don’t clip in. If I’m riding quite a distance with very few stops, I’m clipped. I like being clipped as it seems more efficient when pedaling since your feet don’t move on the pedals. I really didn’t think I’d like them as much as I do, but took the plunge and glad I did.
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Old 08-09-18, 05:42 AM
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yes, they are super easy, i was in the same boat and worried for nothing.
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Old 08-09-18, 05:56 AM
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I thought about it too, and for me, I just can't do it... I've seen the Shimano A530's (double sided pedals) in my LBS, and even sat down on a demo road bike with them. Clip into them, or flip them around and use the flat platform. But like I said, I just can't do it... Maybe it's me. Maybe I'm just weird.

Honestly? Old C&V style road bikes, friction shifters, gumwall tires, etc... would look a little odd with clipless pedals. Sort of anachronistic -- I think that's the word.
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Old 08-09-18, 06:28 AM
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There should be no fear of clipless.

M520's are probably the most popular clipless pedal on the planet and dirt cheap. Just practice on a grassy field the first time.

Remember that there are two kinds of cleats. SH-56 are going to be easier to get in and out of but less secure for aggressive riding and racing. SH-51 are going to be more secure if you ride hard but slightly more difficult to clip out if riding casually. That said, many people use the SH-51 cleats without a problem.



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Old 08-09-18, 06:29 AM
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Yes.

Consider the SH-56 cleat rather than the SH-51 cleat, as they are easier to clip out in a panic stop. (The guy above just beat me to it.)

I am using the Shimano M647 pedals, which are pretty nice albeit a little pricey. Iíve never touched the tension settings on them, and I havenít yet popped out of them when I didnít want to.
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Old 08-09-18, 06:51 AM
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My wife and I went clipless for the first time about 10 years ago (I'm 70 now). We went with the A530 and SH-56 cleats - we are recreational riders, not aggressive. We ride a fair amount in stop and go city traffic with lights so the two sided pedals seemed preferable. Neither of us have fallen because of the clipless although we have both crashed for other reasons. We practiced getting in and out on the trainer for a while before putting the pedals on our street bikes. Been happy the whole time.
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Old 08-09-18, 07:03 AM
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Go clipless, you'll be glad you did.
Practice unclipping both feet, you'll use one foot most of the time, but it's good to have the muscle memory to unclip on both sides. And try unclipping by twisting your foot to the outside and to the inside. It will quickly become second nature to clip in and out with out thinking about it.
BTW, you will fall over, we have all done it. Just roll with it, it will be ok.
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Old 08-09-18, 07:38 AM
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I think Mtn. bike pedals and the walkable shoes they employ are best for a recreational rider. I use Speedplay Frogs on my CX bike.
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Old 08-09-18, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ButchA View Post
I thought about it too, and for me, I just can't do it... I've seen the Shimano A530's (double sided pedals) in my LBS, and even sat down on a demo road bike with them. Clip into them, or flip them around and use the flat platform. But like I said, I just can't do it... Maybe it's me. Maybe I'm just weird.

Honestly? Old C&V style road bikes, friction shifters, gumwall tires, etc... would look a little odd with clipless pedals. Sort of anachronistic -- I think that's the word.
Maybe the word you are looking for is "retrogrouch"?
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Old 08-09-18, 02:39 PM
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LOL... Probably!!

I just prefer to get out there and ride "old school" style. 27" gumwall tires... Friction shifters... and yes, TOE CLIPS & STRAPS on MKS Sylvan platform pedals!
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Old 08-09-18, 03:58 PM
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No reason to go clipless if not competing.
Nothing to gain and much to lose.
It is not a hard transition to make but people of all ages and skill levels frequently fall for no other reason than clipless pedals.
Falls that usually result in minor bike damage, cuts, bruises and even broken wrists.
The best part is that you paid a lot of extra money for this to happen in the form of special pedals and shoes.
But hey, if it makes someone feel like a more legit or serious biker who is anyone to dispute that?
Rock on
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Old 08-09-18, 06:07 PM
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I have the Shimano MX80 pedals. They are great. Feet never slip off of these.
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-MX...nt+flat+pedals
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Old 08-09-18, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
No reason to go clipless if not competing.
Nothing to gain and much to lose.
It is not a hard transition to make but people of all ages and skill levels frequently fall for no other reason than clipless pedals.
Falls that usually result in minor bike damage, cuts, bruises and even broken wrists.
The best part is that you paid a lot of extra money for this to happen in the form of special pedals and shoes.
But hey, if it makes someone feel like a more legit or serious biker who is anyone to dispute that?
Rock on
With regular pedals I have trouble keeping my feet in the right position on the pedals and I would think clipless would solve that and be more comfortable than half clips or clips with straps.
If I wanted to be completely safe I wouldn't ride a bike to begin with.
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Old 08-09-18, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
With regular pedals I have trouble keeping my feet in the right position on the pedals and I would think clipless would solve that and be more comfortable than half clips or clips with straps.
If I wanted to be completely safe I wouldn't ride a bike to begin with.
Who referenced being completely safe?
Was just simply and clearly pointing out the negatives.
Unusual rationale though. Bike riding isnít completely safe so anything goes. Why wear a helmet or use lights? They both add weight and make you less aero.
Either way, keeping your feet in the proper position on the pedals is a skill that you have yet to master so it seems you have no choice but to go clipless.
Problem solved
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Old 08-09-18, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
No reason to go clipless if not competing.
Nothing to gain and much to lose.
It is not a hard transition to make but people of all ages and skill levels frequently fall for no other reason than clipless pedals.
Falls that usually result in minor bike damage, cuts, bruises and even broken wrists.
The best part is that you paid a lot of extra money for this to happen in the form of special pedals and shoes.
But hey, if it makes someone feel like a more legit or serious biker who is anyone to dispute that?
Rock on
So all these clipless riders over 50 just do so to feel more legit or serious?
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Old 08-09-18, 08:09 PM
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OP, try to ignore the troll. No one that clips in tells people riding flats that they're "doing it wrong." You'll either like being clipped in or you won't, and odds are you will. A buddy of mine had never clipped in to any pedal in his life, and was a convert the very first time he tried it. A lot of people, myself included, find it more comfortable.
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Old 08-09-18, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
So all these clipless riders over 50 just do so to feel more legit or serious?
Many of them, yes.
Road cycling is a marketing and accessory driven sport.
Rec riders of any age with average speeds of 18 mph or less will routinely spend thousands of dollars on wheels alone.
They will spend additional hundreds and thousands upgrading their stock $3k bike to shave off 1.5 lbs.
If it makes them happy itís all good though
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Old 08-09-18, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ButchA View Post
.....
Honestly? Old C&V style road bikes, friction shifters, gumwall tires, etc... would look a little odd with clipless pedals. Sort of anachronistic -- I think that's the word.
The word you are looking for is Ďefficientí. In my case, road efficient. Look, original deltas.

OP should pick what he wishes but go try on a few. I always say 1st pair from a decent bike shop that you wear for 30 min.









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Old 08-09-18, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
I've been riding my vintage bikes with either half clips or with clips with loose fitting straps. I just can't get used to the idea of having my feet strapped in where I can't get out of them quickly.
I'm curious about clipless pedals. So other than the pedals what type of shoes would I need and what pedals would be good to start out with? Thanks Bob
Go clipless IMO. SPD compatible will give you many options.
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Old 08-09-18, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by ButchA View Post
LOL... Probably!!

I just prefer to get out there and ride "old school" style. 27" gumwall tires... Friction shifters... and yes, TOE CLIPS & STRAPS on MKS Sylvan platform pedals!
I'd ride with you.
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