Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Interesting response

Old 01-09-19, 06:43 PM
  #1  
rck
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: monroe (sw) wi
Posts: 1,327

Bikes: cannondale 400st, dean el diente, specialized hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Interesting response

disclaimer:This is not an attempt to start anew a conversation as to what is the appropriate warning to use when approaching walkers, a topic that as been discussed multiple times.

I went for a walk the other night. and was much surprised to heard the phrase "on your left" behind me. What I found interesting is that my body went left even as my brain said go right. It was if my instinctive physical response overrode or rode over(weak pun intended) what I knew to be the correct move to make. Weird!
rck is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 02:56 AM
  #2  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 8,642

Bikes: Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel, Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 147 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2617 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 26 Posts
It's because most people naturally go where they look or where their heads are turned. It takes practice and concentration to look one way and continue straight. All racers must practice this, whether runners, cyclists, motorcyclists or drivers.

Usually when I approach pedestrians from behind and there's any doubt about their intentions, I slow to slightly faster than their walking pace and announce "Bicycle behind you" in a conversational tone and volume. Then I move into the space they vacate, whichever way they go. Usually they move to the right.

If they're already far to the right and seem to know I'm approaching (if they peek over their shoulder, etc), I may pass slowly without announcing. Sometimes folks seem startled. Others have ear buds in and won't hear anyway.

And that works out pretty well most of the time. Once in awhile a fast approaching cyclist behind me or approaching from the other direction complicates things a bit, but I've gotten into the habit of passing much more slowly than I used to. I feed my need for speed away from the multi-use path. So when I'm on the MUP and trails I take it easy around pedestrians, joggers and slower cyclists. I can always speed up again after I'm clear of other folks. Good opportunity to sprint between those slowdowns, if I need to stretch my legs a bit.
canklecat is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 04:38 AM
  #3  
DaveQ24 
Senior Member
 
DaveQ24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 832

Bikes: Enough plus 1

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 364 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
^All of the above is why I try to get all of my riding in during the hours most people are asleep.
DaveQ24 is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 08:54 AM
  #4  
Deal4Fuji
Friction Fan
 
Deal4Fuji's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 958

Bikes: '82 Fuji Supreme, '84 Team Fuji, '83 Raleigh Olympian, '87 Lotus Excelle, '85 Centurion Ironman, '12 Trek Alpha 1.1, '77 Schwinn Speedster, Schwinn Trailway, Ross Central Park

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 540 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by rck View Post
disclaimer:This is not an attempt to start anew a conversation as to what is the appropriate warning to use when approaching walkers, a topic that as been discussed multiple times.

I went for a walk the other night. and was much surprised to heard the phrase "on your left" behind me. What I found interesting is that my body went left even as my brain said go right. It was if my instinctive physical response overrode or rode over(weak pun intended) what I knew to be the correct move to make. Weird!
Do you think you would have done the same if you heard a bell instead of a voice with the word "left" ? I think bells are usually better
Deal4Fuji is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 09:04 AM
  #5  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,495

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 82 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2907 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 17 Posts
that's interesting. my pet peeve is when ppl are looking in one direction as they walk, but their bodies are slowing moving in the opposite direction. meaning, looking right as they wander left. wonder if it's related
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 09:32 AM
  #6  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,196

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1114 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
It's because most people naturally go where they look or where their heads are turned. It takes practice and concentration to look one way and continue straight. All racers must practice this, whether runners, cyclists, motorcyclists or drivers.
From my mountain biking days we used to say "Look where you want to go, not at what you want to miss." I still find that advice hard to follow sometimes.

FWIW, I live 2 miles from Missouri's Katy Trail so I ride on it a lot. I've found a tiny little "ting, ting" Incredibell to be about 50% effective with pedestrians. The other 50% are pretty much oblivious to anything.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 10:59 AM
  #7  
rck
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: monroe (sw) wi
Posts: 1,327

Bikes: cannondale 400st, dean el diente, specialized hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Canklecat may be on to something. I probably heard left, instinctively looked left and moved left. In my defense, I was on a sidewalk and would have stepped into the street if I had moved to the other left. Operator error on my part. I usually use the phrase "rider back" and wait for everyone to settle down. A bell would work just as well, I expect, although I probably would have jumped straight up! Ironic that I was passing under the bike trail bridge at that moment.
rck is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 12:38 PM
  #8  
GuessWhoCycling
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 398
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I say onyerleft as a warning to let others know I am passing.

They really don't need to look back or move. I consider it more of a warning that I am present so they don't move into my line of travel.

Unless the one being passed is blocking the center of a lane or making it impossible for the passer to get by, there really is no need to move or look back. It's more of a warning to avoid interference.
GuessWhoCycling is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 12:43 PM
  #9  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 10,850

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 864 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
This is an interesting video. It's Japanese, but you can figure out what's going on. He rings his bell and watches what the pedestrians do.

BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 12:46 PM
  #10  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 14,790

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 82 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
[QUOTE=BlazingPedals;20741509]This is an interesting video. It's Japanese, but you can figure out what's going on. He rings his bell and watches what the pedestrians do.

/QUOTE]Very cool!
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 01:16 PM
  #11  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,495

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 82 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2907 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 17 Posts
I've noticed that, on wide trails, I can sometimes make noises & that's enough of a warning for ppl ahead to know I was approaching. BUT - older ppl don't have the same hearing ability!
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 05:16 PM
  #12  
MNHarv
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Sartell, MN
Posts: 177

Bikes: Trek Millennia, Trek 400, Raleigh Superbe, Giant OCR3, Bianchi Milano

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I wonder if signage on the rail trails wouldn't be a bad idea.
MNHarv is offline  
Old 01-10-19, 11:19 PM
  #13  
FloridaDave
Junior Member
 
FloridaDave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Coastal Central Florida
Posts: 23

Bikes: 2019 Giant FastRoad Advanced

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I say "on your left" and get about a 50% response. The other half have earbuds and wouldn't hear me if I fired a gun. I say it anyway and ride by them at a slow speed. I try to be unfailingly polite in the hopes that I"m stocking points in my karma bank. I say thanks, give a small wave. Just like I do when I'm on the road and drivers yield to me.
FloridaDave is offline  
Old 01-11-19, 08:09 AM
  #14  
Hoopdriver
On Holiday
 
Hoopdriver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,063

Bikes: A bunch of old steel bikes

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rck View Post
I went for a walk the other night. and was much surprised to heard the phrase "on your left" behind me. What I found interesting is that my body went left even as my brain said go right. It was if my instinctive physical response overrode or rode over(weak pun intended) what I knew to be the correct move to make. Weird!
How far behind you was the rider when he or she called out? Typically riders who voice announce do so as they are passing. Normal reaction is to turn in the direction of the sound which is then alongside you. Had he or she announced further back you would have reacted differently.

The trouble with voice warnings is that a rider who wants to provide sufficient warning must raise their voice significantly, and since that is perceived as rude yelling, many are loath to do it and instead rely on a friendly quiet warning far to close to be effective. I use a bell because it can be heard from a distance and is recognisable to most, though I have been yelled at for not calling out "on your left" in addition to the bell.
Hoopdriver is offline  
Old 01-11-19, 07:24 PM
  #15  
Mainiac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Maine
Posts: 52

Bikes: Fuji Allegro, Miele Mountain Bike, Trek Domane AL 2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
"Just three paved feet to the right of the white fog stripe is all I need."

It may be all you need, but many drivers look at the white line next to a bike path and forget the 3 feet to the rider. Too close for me.
Mainiac is offline  
Old 01-11-19, 09:42 PM
  #16  
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 4,297

Bikes: 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 629 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Deal4Fuji View Post
Do you think you would have done the same if you heard a bell instead of a voice with the word "left" ? I think bells are usually better
I ring my Mickey Mouse Bell and say PASSING ON YOUR LEFT or PASSING LEFT

IMO, on your left is ambiguous and non informative
OldTryGuy is offline  
Old 01-12-19, 04:49 PM
  #17  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 14,380

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2427 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by OldTryGuy View Post
I ring my Mickey Mouse Bell and say PASSING ON YOUR LEFT or PASSING LEFT

IMO, on your left is ambiguous and non informative
"Bike passing" or "Coming around" or "ding ding" or "Excuse me sir, I am about to overtake you" all work. But I usually just ring my bell, and I don't really care what their response is as long as they don't wander in front.
wphamilton is offline  
Old 01-13-19, 09:37 AM
  #18  
JerrySTL
Senior Member
 
JerrySTL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Near St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 1,444

Bikes: Giant Defy Advanced, Breezer Doppler Team, Schwinn Twinn Tandem, Windsor Tourist, 1954 JC Higgens

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
From my mountain biking days we used to say "Look where you want to go, not at what you want to miss." I still find that advice hard to follow sometimes.

FWIW, I live 2 miles from Missouri's Katy Trail so I ride on it a lot. I've found a tiny little "ting, ting" Incredibell to be about 50% effective with pedestrians. The other 50% are pretty much oblivious to anything.
Hey RG!
I find a lot of the oblivious people on trails are often listening to music. If I see earbuds, I don't even bother saying On Your Left anymore.
JerrySTL is offline  
Old 01-13-19, 01:25 PM
  #19  
BobL
Senior Member
 
BobL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Space Coast of Florida
Posts: 85

Bikes: 2005 Airborne Titanium Upright; 1998 Trek 5200

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
This is an interesting video. It's Japanese, but you can figure out what's going on. He rings his bell and watches what the pedestrians do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_MphtzCOEc
I wonder if the reaction is because Japan is one of the countries that drives on the left side of the road? They either went left or spread out left and right.

I would guess that would affect how you react; you've spent your lifetime being trained in how to respond. It's like the "slower traffic keep right" signs in the US. I wonder if that were repeated in the US if people would move to the right?
BobL is offline  
Old 01-13-19, 01:30 PM
  #20  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 40,879

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6544 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 51 Times in 47 Posts
On the MUP, I Ring my bell well back of them , dog walkers and others on the river-walk.. they react appropriately for themselves, and I pass with a 'hello' ..
fietsbob is online now  
Old 01-13-19, 04:05 PM
  #21  
Kedosto
Ambulophobic
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Leandro, CA
Posts: 992
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 357 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
When equipped with a bell, I'll ring it. Without, I call out "coming up behind!" I don't call out left/right as that's often where they'll go. I take whatever side they give me, and offer a pleasant "Thank you" as I pass cautiously.

-Kedosto
Kedosto is offline  
Old 01-13-19, 11:07 PM
  #22  
Joe Bikerider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 240

Bikes: 1969 Peugeot PX10, 1992 Della Santa, Schwinn Spitfire 1960, Biria Easy Boarding 8, Linus Roadster 8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
That video from Japan is a real hoot. I use a bell on the local MUP and it works pretty well, there are variations in responses of course and they seem to me to be generally based on demographics. Some of these are sure things, others more random. I offer these examples. Assume pedestrians walking on right approaching from behind.

Older couple, man on left - woman will tug man to the right, easy pass, worth a “thank you”
Pair of younger men - one on right steps left, one on left steps right, in the confusion easy pass, comment “ make up your mind”
Pair of chatting women - won’t hear anything, ring bell insistantly while approaching, sneak by, no comment
Mom watching toddler toddling on trail - slow down to a stop as necessary, don’t get between mama bear and cub
Older Indian couple - walking on left side, that’s their training, ring once, scoot by
Stroller club - ring enough to get their attention, ease by, comment “is this a race?”
Little kid on bike - ring once, scoot by, don’t say anything especially to the real little ones, let them concentrate on going straight.

That’s enough for now. I hope some university will study this more completey. As that video showed just walking along with a bell will yield good observations
Enjoy.

Joe Bikerider is offline  
Old 01-14-19, 07:09 AM
  #23  
switchblade 327
Newbie
 
switchblade 327's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This is why I like handlebar bells, they sound nice and also give a slightly longer warning,and not yelling which some people may find aggressive.
switchblade 327 is offline  
Old 01-21-19, 08:42 PM
  #24  
MontgomeryMeigs
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
I've also noticed that when saying 'On your left' people will often step to their left, or as mentioned look over their left shoulder and walk the direction their head is turned.

So I tend to announce with 'Good morning' (or whatever time of day it is), and I find that people don't turn around but will instead edge toward their right to let me pass. Maybe the absence of the word 'left' has something to do with their reaction.
MontgomeryMeigs is offline  
Old 01-22-19, 08:45 AM
  #25  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Kabuki12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Ventura County ,California
Posts: 355

Bikes: 1973 Windsor Profesional,1976 Kabuki diamond formula with full Campy, 1977 Raleigh Competition GS , 1971 Stella original Campy equip. 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1972 Italvega Gran Rally ,1972 Super Mondia Special

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
I ran into all sorts of situations and the bell is the most consistently effective tool. On your left or rider back is ok , it just doesn't seem to work as well. And then there is the stinking ear buds! Drat!!! They wouldn't hear anything no matter what you do.
Kabuki12 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.