Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

New bike at 70?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

New bike at 70?

Old 02-09-21, 09:53 AM
  #51  
yrrej
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by jleeg View Post
These rambling obsessive musings are not foreign here but that doesnít make them any less self indulgent. Fair warning.

Iím 69, but will likely be 70 on arrival if I go for it.

Iím a roadie. I might ride the gravel grinder when snow melt and cinders are to be encountered on winter roads here in PA, but my steady companion is a 28 yr old Merlin Titanium. I bought it new with an aluminum fork that I thought Iíd upgrade to carbon fiber but never did. The original Campy Ergo 8 speed was replaced with Campy Chorus 12 that Iím very happy with. I love this bike and from what a I can tell, Iím getting a great ride (not having ridden a modern road bike I donít have a frame of reference...if that matters).

Me. Cycling was it for me until I met flyfishing. But after many yearís hiatus I am back to riding 6 days most weeks. I ride outside as often as possible (22 degrees is my coldest so far) and ride on a Wahoo when dark (still working) or in inclement weather. Iím averaging 165 mi/week, more in warm seasons. I love big hills and for the most part a B or B+ rider. Once a mediocre racer.

My dilemma. Iím limited to 23mm tires due to frame spacing...front and rear. Winter shifting is difficult when my fingers go numb. The only electronic shift that is compatible with this bike is sram Bluetooth, so that upgrade is expensively available. I suppose electric shifting is easier but Iím not educated enough about that to be certain. The aluminum fork, the weak part of the bike....well one mechanic marveled at its longevity. And what about the inability to run disc brakes? Clearly, I can continue to ride this loving companion (ok, it is a heartless object) until one of us wears out or breaks down. Or I can have stainless steel Tommassini built with disc brake e shifters.... and shed a little weight in the process (dropping from 185 to 149 this year was the better way). Really donít have a grail bike in mind...a few dance through my head at times.

A new bike is not a financial reach but nor is it a charitable donation or a gift to my wife. How many years can I get out of it? Will a modern bike make riding safer, easier, or itís rider happier?

I know, to be blessed with dilemma of this magnitude, shame on me. Best to all.
Well I am over eighty years old and bought a Vado SL 5.0 last September and already have over thousand miles on the rascal, go for it....
yrrej is offline  
Likes For yrrej:
Old 02-10-21, 12:37 PM
  #52  
patnoe
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: Bremerton, Wa
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Greenhil View Post
You’re going to get a lot of encouragement here to buy. It’s gives the rest of us justification for making our own purchases! Seriously, though, there’s a good chance it will increase your riding and therefore improve your fitness, which will lengthen your riding life. For the record, I’m 72 and just bought a new bike. Having you buy one, too, will make me feel better.
That is so true. I have been contemplating upgrading from my 2009 Roubaix Comp, but find myself thinking, "well, I am 62, should I spent big bucks on a new bike." Love reading the replies from all the 80+ riders still going strong.
patnoe is offline  
Likes For patnoe:
Old 02-10-21, 12:45 PM
  #53  
patnoe
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: Bremerton, Wa
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Johnk3 View Post
When I was about to turn 70, I decided to get a custom Cinelli Supercorsa. That process ended up being a nightmare. As a result, I ordered a custom Cicli Barco using Columbus XCr stainless steel tubing and Campy's 12 speed Super Record group set. It was an easy and seamless transaction due to the wonderful Barco family. They do exceptional work in a reasonable amount of time for very reasonable prices. They also got me great prices on the Campy group set as well as some very nice carbon stuff by WR Compositi who makes carbon parts for Ferrari and Lamborghini, and is not available in the US. You can reward yourself by getting exactly what you want without any compromises. Don't bother with those nasty looking disc brakes when you can get really nice direct mount rim brakes that never get out of whack. This bike weighs 18.67 lbs. for a 58.5 cm frame. I could have cut off more weight with some lightweight carbon wheels, but I'm about 215 Lbs. and ride some rough roads and I hate how noisy carbon wheels are. The tires are Vittoria Corsa Control 25mm mounted on HED Belgium Plus rims and White Industries T11 hubs.. The clearance for tires is about 28mm with the Campy direct mount brakes.



Custom Cicli Barco in Stainless XCr with Campy 12 sp. SR group set and carbon by WR Compositi.

Dark Nickel head badge

Stainless steel fork with carbon fiber steering tube and direct mount brakes.

Custom nameplate.
Check out the Dura Ace c24 wheels. They are super light, have an aluminum brake rim, and don't sound like carbon wheels. I love mine. However, they may not quite fit in with the old-school purist vibe you got going on your build.
patnoe is offline  
Old 02-10-21, 03:15 PM
  #54  
Oldguyonoldbike
Senior Member
 
Oldguyonoldbike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Norman, OK
Posts: 817

Bikes: Casati Laser, Colnago Tecnos, CiŲcc Exige, Black Mountain Cycles Road

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 157 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by jleeg View Post
Issue: Is the innovation Iíd get in a new bike significant enough in terms of safety and performance? Wider tires canít be accomplished on this bike, modern geometries and weight can bring a more nimble ride, I guess.
A lot of things have changed in 28 years, but whether the changes have been significant enough is very subjective. You have a very nice bike that will clearly last a lot longer, especially with the updated drivetrain.
On the other hand, I have a couple of 20+ year old racing bikes that are very nice bikes. My body, however, is also 20+ years older. I prefer not to ride those bikes for more than a couple of hours at a time - the combination of 23mm tires and a lower riding position is tiring. I think you should at least test ride something with a more relaxed riding position. I have found that in two bikes, one simply by going a size up and fiddling with the stem position, the other with a much taller stack. 28 or 30mm tires also make a huge difference in terms of comfort.
Personally, I don't feel the need to go with either electronic shifting or disc brakes, but they are objective improvements. Whether or not they make enough of a difference to you, only you can say.
In short, you have nothing to lose in trying out a few new bikes. If you want one and you can afford it, then why the hell not?
Oldguyonoldbike is offline  
Old 02-10-21, 09:58 PM
  #55  
vane171
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 252 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 48 Posts
I'd say, if you can reasonably afford new bike, go for it. And if you might end up not going for it, don't let the reason be to leave more money to your children or whoever else. Its better for children to fend for themselves anyway. I only write this because I've seen too many people with that motivation who forwent (not sure I just made the word up, it is meant to be past time for 'forgo' , probably I should use 'denied themselves') buying something they wanted for themselves.

Looked it up and my hunch was right, past tense is indeed 'forwent'.

Last edited by vane171; 02-10-21 at 10:05 PM.
vane171 is offline  
Old 02-12-21, 04:01 PM
  #56  
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Posts: 8,234

Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
Liked 83 Times in 57 Posts
Originally Posted by Johnk3 View Post
When I was about to turn 70, I decided to get a custom Cinelli Supercorsa. That process ended up being a nightmare. As a result, I ordered a custom Cicli Barco using Columbus XCr stainless steel tubing and Campy's 12 speed Super Record group set. It was an easy and seamless transaction due to the wonderful Barco family. They do exceptional work in a reasonable amount of time for very reasonable prices. They also got me great prices on the Campy group set as well as some very nice carbon stuff by WR Compositi who makes carbon parts for Ferrari and Lamborghini, and is not available in the US. You can reward yourself by getting exactly what you want without any compromises. Don't bother with those nasty looking disc brakes when you can get really nice direct mount rim brakes that never get out of whack. This bike weighs 18.67 lbs. for a 58.5 cm frame. I could have cut off more weight with some lightweight carbon wheels, but I'm about 215 Lbs. and ride some rough roads and I hate how noisy carbon wheels are. The tires are Vittoria Corsa Control 25mm mounted on HED Belgium Plus rims and White Industries T11 hubs.. The clearance for tires is about 28mm with the Campy direct mount brakes.



Custom Cicli Barco in Stainless XCr with Campy 12 sp. SR group set and carbon by WR Compositi.

Dark Nickel head badge

Stainless steel fork with carbon fiber steering tube and direct mount brakes.

Custom nameplate.
Very, very, NICE!
Wanderer is offline  
Old 02-12-21, 08:53 PM
  #57  
Ptcycles
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Sylvania, OH
Posts: 74

Bikes: 73 Schwinn Continental, (my first), 1993 Nobelette, Cannondale 500,Team Fugi, Raleigh Supercourse, Raleigh Gran Sport, 1976 Krystal, Tsunami, Giant Boulder SE, Series 30 Paramount, Scott Unitrack, As long as I have room the Hoard will grow...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
New age bike

Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
Very, very, NICE!
Hey..
70 is the new 55, so there is no reason you shouldn't be riding a new bike for at least 20 years. Ride hard, ride strong, and ride it like you stole it. Enjoy your new bike.
Ptcycles is offline  
Likes For Ptcycles:
Old 02-12-21, 09:12 PM
  #58  
Jumpski
Full Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Thailand
Posts: 239

Bikes: Bianchi Infinito CV, Trek X- CAL 29er HT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 44 Posts
Life is short! Get a new dream bike.
Jumpski is offline  
Likes For Jumpski:
Old 02-14-21, 08:00 PM
  #59  
bgross
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
I used to be friends with a Bulgarian couple. There was a phrase in the old country you'd use when talking about an old guy, roughly translated to "last pair of shoes guy", meaning a guy who's wearing the last pair of shoes he's ever going to buy. They moved to another state and we've lost touch, but that phrase sticks with me.

Are you ready to be "last bike guy"?

Buy the bike.
I retired (15 years ago) from the grocery industry. Iíll never forget the first customer who said ďSon, at my age you donít buy green bananas.Ē
Heard that many, many times.
bgross is offline  
Old 02-18-21, 04:33 PM
  #60  
rydabent
Senior Member
 
rydabent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 9,805

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3234 Post(s)
Liked 998 Times in 599 Posts
Originally Posted by jleeg View Post
These rambling obsessive musings are not foreign here but that doesnít make them any less self indulgent. Fair warning.

Iím 69, but will likely be 70 on arrival if I go for it.

Iím a roadie. I might ride the gravel grinder when snow melt and cinders are to be encountered on winter roads here in PA, but my steady companion is a 28 yr old Merlin Titanium. I bought it new with an aluminum fork that I thought Iíd upgrade to carbon fiber but never did. The original Campy Ergo 8 speed was replaced with Campy Chorus 12 that Iím very happy with. I love this bike and from what a I can tell, Iím getting a great ride (not having ridden a modern road bike I donít have a frame of reference...if that matters).

Me. Cycling was it for me until I met flyfishing. But after many yearís hiatus I am back to riding 6 days most weeks. I ride outside as often as possible (22 degrees is my coldest so far) and ride on a Wahoo when dark (still working) or in inclement weather. Iím averaging 165 mi/week, more in warm seasons. I love big hills and for the most part a B or B+ rider. Once a mediocre racer.

My dilemma. Iím limited to 23mm tires due to frame spacing...front and rear. Winter shifting is difficult when my fingers go numb. The only electronic shift that is compatible with this bike is sram Bluetooth, so that upgrade is expensively available. I suppose electric shifting is easier but Iím not educated enough about that to be certain. The aluminum fork, the weak part of the bike....well one mechanic marveled at its longevity. And what about the inability to run disc brakes? Clearly, I can continue to ride this loving companion (ok, it is a heartless object) until one of us wears out or breaks down. Or I can have stainless steel Tommassini built with disc brake e shifters.... and shed a little weight in the process (dropping from 185 to 149 this year was the better way). Really donít have a grail bike in mind...a few dance through my head at times.

A new bike is not a financial reach but nor is it a charitable donation or a gift to my wife. How many years can I get out of it? Will a modern bike make riding safer, easier, or itís rider happier?

I know, to be blessed with dilemma of this magnitude, shame on me. Best to all.
I got my latest ride a trike when I was 74. It was an outstanding decision. I say you should go for it. You may live to be 100!!!!!!!!!!!!!
rydabent is offline  
Likes For rydabent:
Old 02-21-21, 02:06 PM
  #61  
Inusuit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: SE Wyoming
Posts: 508

Bikes: 1987 Diamondback Ascent, 1995 Specialized Rockhopper,1989 Specialized Rock Combo, 2013 Specialized Tarmac Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
Liked 470 Times in 229 Posts
At 75, I bought a NOS 2013 Specialized Tarmac Elite. Had been riding a 1985 Diamondback Ascent. Of course the difference was amazing.

Some of the best advice I received was "How old would you be if didn't buy a new bike?" I may not wear out any of my bikes (last pair of shoes), but I am enjoying them all.
Inusuit is offline  
Likes For Inusuit:
Old 02-22-21, 09:18 AM
  #62  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,225

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1571 Post(s)
Liked 639 Times in 360 Posts
I think that it all comes down to finances.

Essentially, you have a pretty high end bike that you bought 28 years ago. You are growing dissatisfied with it because of technology changes. A new bike is going to be a financial hit because you aren't likely to be satisfied with a cost point bike.

Two questions: 1. Do you have the money available to buy yourself the new bike that you want without otherwise upsetting your lifestyle? 2. If you don't buy the bike, what is going to happen to the money that you didn't spend on it?

This thread, by the way, is the second one in 24 hours in which I've suggested the OP check out my sig line.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 02-23-21, 12:45 PM
  #63  
Alpenstock
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 9

Bikes: cool old school stuff made of metal

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
fifty plus musings

as an older guy you have nothing to prove except to your gal
an old colnago will outperform any newfangled electro buzz gadget
grease it up and hit the road
spend the extra money you saved on some dope threads (assos)
you're welcome
Alpenstock is offline  
Likes For Alpenstock:
Old 03-17-21, 08:38 PM
  #64  
Chad991
Senior Member
 
Chad991's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Ohio
Posts: 127

Bikes: Lynsky Helix Pro

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 31 Posts
You got to 70, you earned it GO FOR IT...buy a new one at 80 and 90.....can't take it with you, enjoy life
Chad991 is offline  
Old 03-18-21, 11:40 AM
  #65  
Terex
Senior Member
 
Terex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: 7600' Northern New Mexico
Posts: 3,668

Bikes: Specialized 6Fattie, Parlee Z5, Scott Addict

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 20 Posts
Sure, get a new bike. I'll be 70 in a few weeks with too many bikes now, but if I get back into shape and start riding a lot of gravel routes on road trips here in the west, I'll be looking at a gravel-centric bike with bigger tires and disc brakes. I've got a Cannondale SuperX cyclocross bike that's about 10 years old, but I may want something with room for bigger tires. And e-shifting looks pretty sweet. Again, get yourself a new bike if you can find something appropriate for your needs.
Terex is offline  
Old 03-20-21, 10:07 AM
  #66  
zacster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 7,456

Bikes: Kuota Kredo/Chorus, Trek 7000 commuter, Trek 8000 MTB and a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked 351 Times in 276 Posts
I'm 66 and I've been riding my carbon Kuota bike for 15 years now with Chorus 10. I rented a brand new Specialized Roubaix when I was in San Fran just before the pandemic hit, and it was a revelation. Fatter tires, wider gears, a shock absorbing stem, disc brakes, through axle hubs, 11sp 105. It all added up to a much more comfortable ride that was still as fast as my current bike and shifted better than my Chorus. The low gear was 34/34 and I didn't have to struggle uphill even in SF.
zacster is offline  
Likes For zacster:
Old 03-20-21, 10:09 AM
  #67  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,896

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1275 Post(s)
Liked 1,057 Times in 524 Posts
Originally Posted by zacster View Post
I'm 66 and I've been riding my carbon Kuota bike for 15 years now with Chorus 10. I rented a brand new Specialized Roubaix when I was in San Fran just before the pandemic hit, and it was a revelation. Fatter tires, wider gears, a shock absorbing stem, disc brakes, through axle hubs, 11sp 105. It all added up to a much more comfortable ride that was still as fast as my current bike and shifted better than my Chorus. The low gear was 34/34 and I didn't have to struggle uphill even in SF.
Might you buy One?
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 03-20-21, 09:02 PM
  #68  
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 5,465

Bikes: Day6 Semi Recumbent "FIREBALL", 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1009 Post(s)
Liked 682 Times in 438 Posts
71 in JULY and just treated myself to a NEW 2 ME >>> only it has rim brakes and is a 7sp internal >>> COOL RIDE!!!

OldTryGuy is offline  
Old 03-21-21, 10:11 AM
  #69  
rydabent
Senior Member
 
rydabent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 9,805

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3234 Post(s)
Liked 998 Times in 599 Posts
Originally Posted by jleeg View Post
These rambling obsessive musings are not foreign here but that doesnít make them any less self indulgent. Fair warning.

Iím 69, but will likely be 70 on arrival if I go for it.

Iím a roadie. I might ride the gravel grinder when snow melt and cinders are to be encountered on winter roads here in PA, but my steady companion is a 28 yr old Merlin Titanium. I bought it new with an aluminum fork that I thought Iíd upgrade to carbon fiber but never did. The original Campy Ergo 8 speed was replaced with Campy Chorus 12 that Iím very happy with. I love this bike and from what a I can tell, Iím getting a great ride (not having ridden a modern road bike I donít have a frame of reference...if that matters).

Me. Cycling was it for me until I met flyfishing. But after many yearís hiatus I am back to riding 6 days most weeks. I ride outside as often as possible (22 degrees is my coldest so far) and ride on a Wahoo when dark (still working) or in inclement weather. Iím averaging 165 mi/week, more in warm seasons. I love big hills and for the most part a B or B+ rider. Once a mediocre racer.

My dilemma. Iím limited to 23mm tires due to frame spacing...front and rear. Winter shifting is difficult when my fingers go numb. The only electronic shift that is compatible with this bike is sram Bluetooth, so that upgrade is expensively available. I suppose electric shifting is easier but Iím not educated enough about that to be certain. The aluminum fork, the weak part of the bike....well one mechanic marveled at its longevity. And what about the inability to run disc brakes? Clearly, I can continue to ride this loving companion (ok, it is a heartless object) until one of us wears out or breaks down. Or I can have stainless steel Tommassini built with disc brake e shifters.... and shed a little weight in the process (dropping from 185 to 149 this year was the better way). Really donít have a grail bike in mind...a few dance through my head at times.

A new bike is not a financial reach but nor is it a charitable donation or a gift to my wife. How many years can I get out of it? Will a modern bike make riding safer, easier, or itís rider happier?

I know, to be blessed with dilemma of this magnitude, shame on me. Best to all.
Why not go for a new bike. Most really old people almost always say they are not sorry so much for the things they did do, but what they didnt do. Cycling may keep you healthy for at least another 15 or more years. I for instance am 82 and do not see the end of my cycling for many more years.
rydabent is offline  
Likes For rydabent:
Old 03-21-21, 11:47 PM
  #70  
afm199
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 98

Bikes: Trek Madone, 2012, Trek Kronos CX Ultimate, 2012

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 32 Posts
I'm 75 and just got my first full carbon 17 pound bike. It is in addition to my old (2014) aluminum frame road bike. I'm looking at a sub 17 pound ride to replace that, but honestly love the upgraded alu frame.

The carbon frame is great. So glad I bought it.
afm199 is offline  
Likes For afm199:
Old 03-22-21, 04:25 AM
  #71  
blakcloud
Senior Member
 
blakcloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,583
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 603 Post(s)
Liked 342 Times in 220 Posts
A few years back when all I rode was my Rivendell, I wanted to try a carbon bike since I had never ridden one and of course they were all the rage. I test drove a Specialized Roubaix and I just couldn't find anything wrong with it. The bike rode like a dream, I just couldn't find fault with the bike at all. As nice as it was I just couldn't see myself riding it. I just didn't need it.

My point, try test riding a bike first and it may be everything that you think you are missing or it may be something you really don't need. I am not the first in this three page spread to suggest this. It is always easy to spend someone else's money, so it would be easy for me to say, buy a new bike but is it the best advice for you?

Good luck with this decision. It would be interesting to hear your thought process now that this thread is almost two months old and you have had time to evaluate the advice you have been given.
blakcloud is offline  
Old 03-27-21, 12:02 PM
  #72  
jleeg
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Dauphin, PA
Posts: 88

Bikes: Moseman with Campy NR circa 1979, Merlin Titanium from1993 with newly installed Campy Chorus 12, Raleigh Tamland II gravel grinder, Tommassini XFire with Campy Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 38 Posts
Frame is purchased. Awaiting wheels and gruppo. No giveaways so stay tuned!
jleeg is offline  
Likes For jleeg:
Old 04-25-21, 10:37 AM
  #73  
jleeg
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Dauphin, PA
Posts: 88

Bikes: Moseman with Campy NR circa 1979, Merlin Titanium from1993 with newly installed Campy Chorus 12, Raleigh Tamland II gravel grinder, Tommassini XFire with Campy Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 38 Posts
I did it. I didnít go far from my Merlin, though Iím back to steel.



Tommassini XFire
jleeg is offline  
Old 04-25-21, 02:33 PM
  #74  
BCAC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Central Fl
Posts: 137

Bikes: Argon 18 Gallium, GF 29er, old Trek Madone

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by jleeg View Post
I did it. I didnít go far from my Merlin, though Iím back to steel.



Tommassini XFire
Thatís beautiful. And from what Iíve read, exceptional to ride. Congrats!
BCAC is offline  
Old 04-27-21, 06:06 PM
  #75  
zacster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 7,456

Bikes: Kuota Kredo/Chorus, Trek 7000 commuter, Trek 8000 MTB and a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked 351 Times in 276 Posts
Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
Might you buy One?
I'd buy one if I were looking to buy a new bike but I'm not. At 66 I'll be happy with what I have as long as I can keep riding. If I were younger I'd look at the Roubaix as an option for sure.

Better late than never with the reply. I haven't been on the forums much lately.
zacster is offline  
Likes For zacster:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.