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In Between Sizes - Big Difference?

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In Between Sizes - Big Difference?

Old 06-09-20, 11:11 PM
  #1  
Jtsweeep
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In Between Sizes - Big Difference?

Hey everyone, I just received my Canyon Pathlite hybrid and am not sure if it's too big or not. I feel a little stretched out but it just might be because I haven't ridden in a while and don't know what it should feel like. The Canyon measurement tool on the site says I'm a small but the rep on the phone suggested I get a medium so I got a medium. I'm 5'10" with a 31" inseam. If I put in one inch taller and one higher for the inseam, it says medium so I figure I'm right on the border.

Could you guys tell me if there would be a big difference in feel based on the geometry of a small and a medium? I've compared the numbers and a lot of the measurements are the same or less than 1" difference but I don't know what that translates to in body position. The standover height is .87" higher in the medium. I can stand over the top tube flat footed but the boys are touching it. How important is that?

Should I get a small or is a medium fine? TIA


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Old 06-10-20, 04:58 AM
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Size is determined by your body build.
BTW - 1 " is a significant amount of change in bicycle parlance.

That is, do you have a long torso or shorter torso and longer legs? Long arms?

How fit are you and how are you going to be riding this bicycle - as a recreational rider on groomed trail or at a higher, performance orientation?


The top tube length related to torso length, and steering geometry is related to stem length.
A long top tube with a short stem handles differently that a shorter top tube and longer stem.

Fit is a factor of all of this, including crank arm length.

When I fit, feet are first, saddle height/position is next and then stem length.
They all work together for proper fit.

As I like to say - the top tube always wins!
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Old 06-10-20, 09:54 AM
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Probably like purchasing speakers for your stereo. If you never listen to a different pair, you will think your pair the perfect sound.

Everything is just a guess until you ride them for more than around the parking lot. I've ridden bikes that were 6 to 8 cm bigger than what any sane shop owner would have sold me. I was comfortable on all of them. And I rode them for 100 mile rides and for thousands of miles.

So don't get too concerned about being in the overlap if you aren't going to test ride them both.
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Old 06-10-20, 10:39 AM
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Without knowing any of your dimensions other than height, ("inseam" could be anything), you sound like a medium. If you haven't been riding, your opinion of what feels right may not be worth anything. You want to know what feels right after a couple thousand miles, and you can't know that now. If you really want to know more, go to https://www.competitivecyclist.com/S...ulatorBike.jsp
Take your measurements as instructed and enter them into the calculator. Go more by top tube length than anything.
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Old 06-10-20, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by 100bikes View Post
Size is determined by your body build.
BTW - 1 " is a significant amount of change in bicycle parlance. -Yikes, I was afraid of that.

That is, do you have a long torso or shorter torso and longer legs? Long arms? -I would say 60/40 slightly longer torso and average length arms. I wear 32/32 pants and a 34-35 sleeve dress shirt is a hair long on me (32-33 is a hair short).

How fit are you and how are you going to be riding this bicycle - as a recreational rider on groomed trail or at a higher, performance orientation? -I'm fairly fit and athletic although I had shoulder surgery last November. I rode 8.5 miles at an avg speed of 9.3 mph yesterday and wasn't really tired. I would say I'll be riding it at a recreational+ rider level. I won't be doing any real serious mt bike trails.

The top tube length related to torso length, and steering geometry is related to stem length.
A long top tube with a short stem handles differently that a shorter top tube and longer stem.

Fit is a factor of all of this, including crank arm length.

When I fit, feet are first, saddle height/position is next and then stem length.
They all work together for proper fit. -How do you know when the fit is proper? Are there any tell-tail signs that the fit is improper?

As I like to say - the top tube always wins!
rusty
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Probably like purchasing speakers for your stereo. If you never listen to a different pair, you will think your pair the perfect sound.

Everything is just a guess until you ride them for more than around the parking lot. I've ridden bikes that were 6 to 8 cm bigger than what any sane shop owner would have sold me. I was comfortable on all of them. And I rode them for 100 mile rides and for thousands of miles.

So don't get too concerned about being in the overlap if you aren't going to test ride them both.
I would have the opportunity to exchange the bike within 30 days provided they have stock.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Without knowing any of your dimensions other than height, ("inseam" could be anything), you sound like a medium. If you haven't been riding, your opinion of what feels right may not be worth anything. You want to know what feels right after a couple thousand miles, and you can't know that now. If you really want to know more, go to https://www.competitivecyclist.com/S...ulatorBike.jsp
Take your measurements as instructed and enter them into the calculator. Go more by top tube length than anything.
That's exactly the problem- I have no idea what it's supposed to feel like. After the 8.5 mile ride, my wrist was hurting a bit and it felt like I was holding myself up with my arms so I'm not sure if the bike is too big or I just have a weak core.

I used the calculator and it gives me three options: the XC fit, the all mountain fit, the gravity fit. I don't know what the difference are but for a couple of them I'm within the top tube spec with the medium bike and one is in the small range.
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Old 06-10-20, 01:09 PM
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If you get a size that is within what the manufacturer sizing guide show, whether the bigger or smaller of the overlap size, then there are adjustments that can be made to deal with issues of too much pressure on wrists and many other pains, soreness and numbness people gripe about.

A lot can be done by just changing the fore/aft, tilt and height of the seat. Some the height of the bars. And even a change of the stem length in some cases which is the only one that will cost a few more bucks.
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Old 06-10-20, 03:20 PM
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^ And you should be able to get the shop to fit the bike to you, with the correct stem and all adjustments, no extra charge. Ask.
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Old 06-11-20, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
If you get a size that is within what the manufacturer sizing guide show, whether the bigger or smaller of the overlap size, then there are adjustments that can be made to deal with issues of too much pressure on wrists and many other pains, soreness and numbness people gripe about.

A lot can be done by just changing the fore/aft, tilt and height of the seat. Some the height of the bars. And even a change of the stem length in some cases which is the only one that will cost a few more bucks.
I tried moving the seat fore/aft and up and down and it doesn't seem to make much of a difference. My butt is killing me. Is that a sign of a wrong size bike?

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
^ And you should be able to get the shop to fit the bike to you, with the correct stem and all adjustments, no extra charge. Ask.
This bike is online only and the stem/bars is one piece.
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Old 06-12-20, 09:53 AM
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Are you just starting to ride or have been away from riding for a fair amount of time?

I think age even has a little to do with it for some. 10 or so years ago when I switched from just being a leisurely ride around the neighborhood a few times a month to riding 4 to 6 days or more per week for fitness, my butt was sore for quite a while. Something on the order of weeks for the major annoyance.

I was riding the same bike that was comfortable to me back when I was a teenager, so I knew it wasn't the bike. It was my butt being over 50 and out of riding condition. I rode anyway. I played the Swap Saddle Game which seemed to help, but finally wound up with a saddle that wasn't too different than the one that was on it when I started the saddle swap game.

Even today, if I lay off riding the bike for a couple weeks and then start doing long rides again. I'll get a little annoying muscle and joint pain around my sit bones and maybe my tail bone, but it doesn't last but a few days at the most now. And it's not anything that I'd even complain about to others.

Most of the bikes sold today have decent seats for their intended use. Rarely, there are people that have pelvis that put their sit bones outside the norms. Some bike shops can help you figure it out or just google for "sit bones bicycle seat sizing".

If you are new to cycling and you only do a ride every week or so, you'll probably constantly be plagued with butt soreness.

But remember, this is IMO. And based solely on my perception of things that may or may not have been a factor for me. Along with a little reading that I may or may not have understood fully.

Last edited by Iride01; 06-12-20 at 09:58 AM.
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Old 06-12-20, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Jtsweeep View Post
I tried moving the seat fore/aft and up and down and it doesn't seem to make much of a difference. My butt is killing me. Is that a sign of a wrong size bike?



This bike is online only and the stem/bars is one piece.
Those adjustments actually make a lot of difference, but you haven't ridden enough to see what they do. There are 2 possibilities w/r to your butt:

1) Your sore butt is a sign of a person who hasn't been riding. This is the most likely. The cure is to ride every day if you can, but only for 30 minutes. 2 weeks of that will pretty much take care of it. Unless:
2) The saddle is too soft or too hard or too narrow. You want a saddle that's not hard as a board, but yet not squishy. You should be able to depress your thumb into the padding, but not have it sink very far. If your sit bones are on or near the edge of the saddle, it's too narrow. Bike shops can measure your butt and recommend a proper width saddle. However, #1 is more common.
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Old 06-12-20, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Are you just starting to ride or have been away from riding for a fair amount of time?

I think age even has a little to do with it for some. 10 or so years ago when I switched from just being a leisurely ride around the neighborhood a few times a month to riding 4 to 6 days or more per week for fitness, my butt was sore for quite a while. Something on the order of weeks for the major annoyance.

I was riding the same bike that was comfortable to me back when I was a teenager, so I knew it wasn't the bike. It was my butt being over 50 and out of riding condition. I rode anyway. I played the Swap Saddle Game which seemed to help, but finally wound up with a saddle that wasn't too different than the one that was on it when I started the saddle swap game.

Even today, if I lay off riding the bike for a couple weeks and then start doing long rides again. I'll get a little annoying muscle and joint pain around my sit bones and maybe my tail bone, but it doesn't last but a few days at the most now. And it's not anything that I'd even complain about to others.

Most of the bikes sold today have decent seats for their intended use. Rarely, there are people that have pelvis that put their sit bones outside the norms. Some bike shops can help you figure it out or just google for "sit bones bicycle seat sizing".

If you are new to cycling and you only do a ride every week or so, you'll probably constantly be plagued with butt soreness.

But remember, this is IMO. And based solely on my perception of things that may or may not have been a factor for me. Along with a little reading that I may or may not have understood fully.
I appreciate the insight! I rode a lot when I was younger but it's been quite a while since then. I don't ever remember my butt hurting though so maybe it is the age thing. However, I took a bike tour in Poland last year and I don't remember it hurting.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Those adjustments actually make a lot of difference, but you haven't ridden enough to see what they do. There are 2 possibilities w/r to your butt:

1) Your sore butt is a sign of a person who hasn't been riding. This is the most likely. The cure is to ride every day if you can, but only for 30 minutes. 2 weeks of that will pretty much take care of it. Unless:
2) The saddle is too soft or too hard or too narrow. You want a saddle that's not hard as a board, but yet not squishy. You should be able to depress your thumb into the padding, but not have it sink very far. If your sit bones are on or near the edge of the saddle, it's too narrow. Bike shops can measure your butt and recommend a proper width saddle. However, #1 is more common.
You're right on #1 . I've been riding 1-3 times a week for the past 3 weeks for around 30-55 minutes. I'll do it more regularly and see if it helps. I just adjusted the height and position again after watching a youtube video. I moved the seat max forward and lowered it a bit. It feels like I'm sitting on bone more now rather than flesh so maybe that was part of it. I also ordered some padded pants.
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Old 06-22-20, 03:10 PM
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I am in market for the exact same bike and thinking about getting the M size even Canyon sizing tells me to get S. The top tube difference between S and M is only 8 millimetres (482 vs 490). Where did you buy yours? They are out of stock online and LBS do not have them.

Thanks
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